(CNN)The man who detonated an RV bomb in downtown Nashville, Tennessee, early Christmas morning was a loner with no significant criminal record and as yet no signs of a political ideology.

Anthony Quinn Warner, a 63-year-old from Antioch, Tennessee, died when his RV exploded on 2nd Avenue, damaging more than 40 buildings and injuring at least eight people.Yet no one else died in the blast, partly because Warner’s RV had broadcast ominous warnings in a computerized female voice that it would soon explode, spurring police and bystanders to leave the area. The unusual warnings and sparse evidence of Warner’s politics have prevented authorities from calling the bombing an act of terrorism, which by definition is an act in furtherance of a political goal.Here’s what we know about the man behind the bombing.Read MoreInvestigators tied him to the RVA vehicle burns following an explosion in downtown Nashville on Friday, December 25. A vehicle burns following an explosion in downtown Nashville on Friday, December 25. Photos: Explosion rocks downtown NashvilleA vehicle burns following an explosion in downtown Nashville on Friday, December 25. Hide Caption 1 of 9Smoke rises from 2nd Avenue North in downtown Nashville after the explosion.Smoke rises from 2nd Avenue North in downtown Nashville after the explosion. Photos: Explosion rocks downtown NashvilleSmoke rises from 2nd Avenue North in downtown Nashville after the explosion.Hide Caption 2 of 9Emergency responders assess the damage near the scene.Emergency responders assess the damage near the scene. Photos: Explosion rocks downtown NashvilleEmergency responders assess the damage near the scene.Hide Caption 3 of 9In this photo from the Nashville Fire Department, burned cars, charred branches and debris are seen spread across the street.In this photo from the Nashville Fire Department, burned cars, charred branches and debris are seen spread across the street. Photos: Explosion rocks downtown NashvilleIn this photo from the Nashville Fire Department, burned cars, charred branches and debris are seen spread across the street.Hide Caption 4 of 9A K-9 unit works in the area of the explosion.A K-9 unit works in the area of the explosion. Photos: Explosion rocks downtown NashvilleA K-9 unit works in the area of the explosion.Hide Caption 5 of 9The explosion caused buildings to shake and windows to blow out.The explosion caused buildings to shake and windows to blow out. Photos: Explosion rocks downtown NashvilleThe explosion caused buildings to shake and windows to blow out.Hide Caption 6 of 9Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) agents evaluate the site of the explosion.Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) agents evaluate the site of the explosion. Photos: Explosion rocks downtown NashvilleAlcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) agents evaluate the site of the explosion.Hide Caption 7 of 9Firetrucks and emergency responders fill the streets following the explosion.Firetrucks and emergency responders fill the streets following the explosion. Photos: Explosion rocks downtown NashvilleFiretrucks and emergency responders fill the streets following the explosion.Hide Caption 8 of 9A law enforcement officer walks past damage from the explosion on 2nd Avenue North in downtown Nashville.A law enforcement officer walks past damage from the explosion on 2nd Avenue North in downtown Nashville. Photos: Explosion rocks downtown NashvilleA law enforcement officer walks past damage from the explosion on 2nd Avenue North in downtown Nashville.Hide Caption 9 of 918 nashville explosion 1225 RESTRICTED19 nashville explosion 1225 RESTRICTED04 nashville explosion 122521 nashville explosion 122514 nashville explosion 122510 nashville explosion 122516 nashville explosion 122520 nashville explosion 1225 RESTRICTED22 nashville explosion 1225Warner had not previously been on law enforcement’s radar, according to Tennessee Bureau of Investigation Director David Rausch.He was arrested on a charge of marijuana possession for resale in 1978, when he was 21, but otherwise had no criminal history.Remnants of the RV from the bombing were recovered from the scene and investigators with the Tennessee Highway Patrol were able to determine its Vehicle Identification Number, or VIN, authorities said Sunday. FBI special agent in charge Doug Korneski said the VIN number matched that of a vehicle registered to Warner.Anthony Quinn Warner, 63, was identified by authorities as the Nashville bomber.Anthony Quinn Warner, 63, was identified by authorities as the Nashville bomber.Anthony Quinn Warner, 63, was identified by authorities as the Nashville bomber.In addition, a tip about the RV led law enforcement officials to a Bakertown Road home, a law enforcement official told CNN. Federal investigators were at the home Saturday conducting “court-authorized activity,” FBI spokesman Jason Pack told CNN.An RV seen on Google Street View at Warner’s house appears to match the one law enforcement has asked the public for information on.”He’s had that for a long time,” Steve Schmoldt, a neighbor, said. “Sometimes he’s had it in his driveway. Sometimes he had it in his backyard.”Investigators positively identified Warner as the bomber by comparing DNA from the scene to that on gloves and a hat from a vehicle owned by Warner, Rausch said Monday.He was a loner computer expertNashville officer: 'I told myself, stay on your feet. Stay alive'Nashville officer: 'I told myself, stay on your feet. Stay alive'Nashville officer: 'I told myself, stay on your feet. Stay alive'JUST WATCHEDNashville officer: ‘I told myself, stay on your feet. Stay alive’ReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Nashville officer: ‘I told myself, stay on your feet. Stay alive’ 02:41Neighbors and a person he worked with had little substantive to say about Warner, describing him generally as a loner.Schmoldt has lived next door to Warner since 2001, and his wife has lived in the house since 1995.”He’s lived there a long time and he sort of kept to himself,” Schmoldt told CNN of Warner. “All we knew him by was Tony. He was kind of a hermit.”Rick Laude, another neighbor, was coming home last Monday and saw Warner at his mailbox, he told CNN.”I said — ‘Hey Anthony — is Santa going to bring you something good for Christmas,'” Laude said.The Nashville explosion slammed these small businesses. They'll need help digging outThe Nashville explosion slammed these small businesses. They'll need help digging outThe Nashville explosion slammed these small businesses. They'll need help digging out“He said, ‘Yes, I’m going to be more famous,’ ” Laude recalled. “‘I’m going to be so famous Nashville will never forget me.'”Laude said that he thought that Warner was referring to something good happening, perhaps related to his work in IT.”Let me be very clear, he and I were not friends,” Laude said. “You will not find anyone in my neighborhood who will claim to be a friend of his. He was just a legitimate recluse.”Steve Fridrich, of Fridrich & Clark LLC, said he hired Warner as a computer consultant for his real estate business as an independent contractor for several years. In a statement, he described Warner as a “nice person who never exhibited any behavior which was less than professional.”Public records show Warner owned a home on Bakertown Road in Antioch until November 25, 2020, when he signed a quit claim deed giving ownership of the home to a woman. Antioch is about 12 miles southeast of downtown Nashville.Warner deeded another property on Bakertown Road to the same woman in 2019, according to public records.His motivation is unclearBefore the explosion on Christmas morning, the RV broadcast a computerized female voice repeatedly warning that a bomb would explode in minutes. The RV also broadcast Petula Clark’s 1964 hit “Downtown,” a song about how the bustle of downtown can cure a lonely person’s troubles.The repeated warnings and the early morning timing of the blast — when few were around — suggest that Warner did not intend to cause mass casualties.Investigators are looking at 'any and all possible motives' after identifying Nashville bomberInvestigators are looking at 'any and all possible motives' after identifying Nashville bomberInvestigators are looking at 'any and all possible motives' after identifying Nashville bomberMayor John Cooper said the explosion was “clearly done when no one was going to be around.”So what was his goal in the suicide bombing? Did he even have one?Investigators from the TBI are working with the FBI, ATF and Nashville police on interviewing other family members as well as Warner’s neighbors. They are talking to anyone who knew Warner and trying to get his history as best they can, authorities said.Before exploding, the RV was parked right outside an AT&T transmission building, which sustained significant damage in the blast, knocking out wireless service for much of the region, authorities said.Warner’s father previously worked AT&T, according to Rausch, and he said investigators are looking into whether that may be relevant to the motive.”These answers won’t come quickly,” Korneski said. “Though we may be able to answer some of those questions … none of those answers will ever be enough for those affected by this event.”

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https://www.cnn.com/2020/12/29/us/anthony-quinn-warner-nashville/index.html

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