Story highlightsFoods that boost the production of serotonin and melatonin in the brain might benefit sleepExperts weigh in on what and when to eat before bedtime

(CNN)Many people chug caffeine-packed coffee or scarf down an energy bar to wake up, but what should you eat to wind down?

More than a third of adults in the United States are not getting enough shut-eye, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.So, to make sure that your bedtime snack can be effective in promoting sleep, some experts say it should contain one essential amino acid: tryptophan.How important is a good night's sleep?How important is a good night's sleep?spc vital signs sleep disorders a_00005309JUST WATCHEDHow important is a good night’s sleep?ReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

How important is a good night’s sleep? 07:21″There is a real lack of studies that show that specific nutrients can influence sleep, either better or worse. There are a few exceptions. Tryptophan has been shown to induce sleep,” said Michael Grandner, director of the University of Arizona College of Medicine’s Sleep and Health Research Program.Tryptophan, an amino acid, might help you snooze because once it enters your body, it’s converted into two brain chemicals associated with sleep: melatonin, which helps regulate your body’s natural sleep and wake cycles, and serotonin, which causes relaxation and drowsiness. Read More”Tryptophan is the reason why it is widely perceived that a Thanksgiving dinner causes drowsiness, because of the tryptophan in turkey. However, other foods contain tryptophan, and some have more tryptophan than turkey,” said Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program and specialist in nutrition and preventive medicine.Does your diet influence how well you sleep?Does your diet influence how well you sleep?Does your diet influence how well you sleep?Snacks containing high amounts of tryptophan include egg whites, soybeans, low-fat cheese, chicken and seeds, such as pumpkin or sesame, Hensrud said.Foods rich in carbohydrates, lean in protein and low in fat also may boost the production of serotonin and melatonin, such as granola, unsweetened cereals or whole-grain crackers with milk, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center.Have a sweet tooth? Pineapples, oranges and bananas also may be linked to increased melatonin levels, according to a small study published in the Journal of Pineal Research in 2012.Setting an alarm might be the only thing that helps you get up in the morning, but try setting one at night to remind you when it's time to go to bed. Click through our gallery for other tips for better sleep.Setting an alarm might be the only thing that helps you get up in the morning, but try setting one at night to remind you when it's time to go to bed. Click through our gallery for other tips for better sleep. Photos: Tips for better sleepSetting an alarm might be the only thing that helps you get up in the morning, but try setting one at night to remind you when it’s time to go to bed. Click through our gallery for other tips for better sleep.Hide Caption 1 of 8Did you know that having warm feet can help you sleep? Pull on a pair of socks before bed to speed up how quickly you'll fall asleep.Did you know that having warm feet can help you sleep? Pull on a pair of socks before bed to speed up how quickly you'll fall asleep. Photos: Tips for better sleepDid you know that having warm feet can help you sleep? Pull on a pair of socks before bed to speed up how quickly you’ll fall asleep.Hide Caption 2 of 8Even the smallest amount of light can disrupt your sleep patterns. Keep your bedroom as dark as possible for the best night's sleep.Even the smallest amount of light can disrupt your sleep patterns. Keep your bedroom as dark as possible for the best night's sleep. Photos: Tips for better sleepEven the smallest amount of light can disrupt your sleep patterns. Keep your bedroom as dark as possible for the best night’s sleep.Hide Caption 3 of 8Exercise regularly? You'll sleep better. Even a few minutes of physical activity a day can help.Exercise regularly? You'll sleep better. Even a few minutes of physical activity a day can help. Photos: Tips for better sleepExercise regularly? You’ll sleep better. Even a few minutes of physical activity a day can help.Hide Caption 4 of 8Paint your bedroom a tranquil color to make your room a restful one.Paint your bedroom a tranquil color to make your room a restful one. Photos: Tips for better sleepPaint your bedroom a tranquil color to make your room a restful one.Hide Caption 5 of 8Naps, when limited to 30 minutes and not too close to bedtime, won't interrupt your nightly sleep routine.Naps, when limited to 30 minutes and not too close to bedtime, won't interrupt your nightly sleep routine. Photos: Tips for better sleepNaps, when limited to 30 minutes and not too close to bedtime, won’t interrupt your nightly sleep routine.Hide Caption 6 of 8Yoga can help you wind down at the end of the day and calm your mind, which also slows your breathing and heart rate for better sleep.Yoga can help you wind down at the end of the day and calm your mind, which also slows your breathing and heart rate for better sleep. Photos: Tips for better sleepYoga can help you wind down at the end of the day and calm your mind, which also slows your breathing and heart rate for better sleep.Hide Caption 7 of 8Get some sunlight first thing in the morning. It triggers your brain to stay awake and alert early in the day and helps you ease into sleep a little earlier at night.Get some sunlight first thing in the morning. It triggers your brain to stay awake and alert early in the day and helps you ease into sleep a little earlier at night. Photos: Tips for better sleepGet some sunlight first thing in the morning. It triggers your brain to stay awake and alert early in the day and helps you ease into sleep a little earlier at night.Hide Caption 8 of 801 better sleep02 better sleep02 constantly hungry01 constantly hungry03 better sleep RESTRICTED04 better sleep RESTRICTED05 better sleep06 better sleepOn the other hand, eating foods low in fiber but high in saturated fat and sugar is associated with a lower quality of sleep, such as having difficulty falling asleep or not spending as much time during your sleep cycle in a deep sleep. That’s according to a small study published last year in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.Spicy foods and caffeine before bedtime are also associated with impaired sleep — and not only what you eat but when you eat can play a role in how well you snooze. One small study published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine in 2013 suggests that you should refrain from consuming caffeine within six hours of bedtime.Join the conversation

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The CDC recommends avoiding large meals too close bedtime. Grandner said people can eat a big meal about four or five hours beforehand. And what about late-night snacks? “It’s never too late to eat a small snack,” he said. “I might have a small snack about an hour before going to bed, but many nights, I don’t.”People with gastroesophageal reflux disease, or acid reflux, should be careful not to lie down within three hours after a meal. That might trigger symptoms of reflux, which could interfere with sleep, Hensrud said.

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