(CNN)The United Arab Emirates has announced it will send an astronaut to the International Space Station (ISS) next year, becoming the latest nation to launch a citizen beyond Earth.

Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid took to Twitter with the initial announcement, with further details revealed via Russian space agency Roscosmos.UAE looks to Mars for STEM inspirationUAE looks to Mars for STEM inspirationUAE looks to Mars for STEM inspirationRoscosmos announced it had signed a preliminary agreement with the Mohammed Bin Rashid Space Centre to send a UAE astronaut on a 10-day mission to the ISS in April 2019 aboard a Soyuz MS-12 spacecraft. The final agreement for what will be the UAE’s first manned space mission is set to be made by the end of August this year.As of June 8, 232 people from 18 countries have visited the space station according to NASA — none so far from a Middle Eastern nation.Earlier this month it was revealed the UAE Astronaut Programme had shortlisted 95 potential astronauts from over 4,000 applicants. Seventy-five of the shortlist are men and 20 are women. Read MoreAccording to the June 6 release, further testing will conclude with the selection of four top candidates and two reserves, comprising the first UAE Astronaut Corps. Candidates will have to learn Russian and skills in robotics, navigation and medical aid. One of these candidates will make the trip to the ISS, “and the rest of the team will follow.”It is unclear whether today’s agreement marks any change to these plans. The Russian space agency states it will play a part in selecting and preparing the Emirati astronaut for the flight — a process set to begin in August. The UAE plans to send a probe to Mars in 2020 -- -- the Arab world's first mission to another planet. More ambitious still, there are plans to develop a human settlement on Mars by 2117. The Emirates' space program is a bold move, joining a growing list of nations exploring our solar system and beyond. <br /><em><br />Scroll through the gallery to discover more about the wonders of the universe.</em>The UAE plans to send a probe to Mars in 2020 -- -- the Arab world's first mission to another planet. More ambitious still, there are plans to develop a human settlement on Mars by 2117. The Emirates' space program is a bold move, joining a growing list of nations exploring our solar system and beyond. <br /><em><br />Scroll through the gallery to discover more about the wonders of the universe.</em> Photos: Wonders of the universeThe UAE plans to send a probe to Mars in 2020 — — the Arab world’s first mission to another planet. More ambitious still, there are plans to develop a human settlement on Mars by 2117. The Emirates’ space program is a bold move, joining a growing list of nations exploring our solar system and beyond. Scroll through the gallery to discover more about the wonders of the universe.Hide Caption 1 of 59This inner slope of a Martian crater has several of the seasonal dark streaks called "recurrent slope lineae," or RSL, that a November 2017 report interprets as granular flows, rather than darkening due to flowing water. The image is from the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.This inner slope of a Martian crater has several of the seasonal dark streaks called "recurrent slope lineae," or RSL, that a November 2017 report interprets as granular flows, rather than darkening due to flowing water. The image is from the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis inner slope of a Martian crater has several of the seasonal dark streaks called “recurrent slope lineae,” or RSL, that a November 2017 report interprets as granular flows, rather than darkening due to flowing water. The image is from the HiRISE camera on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.Hide Caption 2 of 59'Oumuamua, the first observed interstellar asteroid, is shown in an artist's illustration. It is longer and varies more in brightness than any asteroid to be formed in our solar system. 'Oumuamua, the first observed interstellar asteroid, is shown in an artist's illustration. It is longer and varies more in brightness than any asteroid to be formed in our solar system. Photos: Wonders of the universe’Oumuamua, the first observed interstellar asteroid, is shown in an artist’s illustration. It is longer and varies more in brightness than any asteroid to be formed in our solar system. Hide Caption 3 of 59This artist's impression shows a supernova explosion, which contains the luminosity of 100 million suns. Supernova iPTF14hls, which has exploded multiple times, may be the most massive and longest-lasting ever observed. This artist's impression shows a supernova explosion, which contains the luminosity of 100 million suns. Supernova iPTF14hls, which has exploded multiple times, may be the most massive and longest-lasting ever observed. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis artist’s impression shows a supernova explosion, which contains the luminosity of 100 million suns. Supernova iPTF14hls, which has exploded multiple times, may be the most massive and longest-lasting ever observed. Hide Caption 4 of 59This illustration shows hydrocarbon compounds splitting into carbon and hydrogen inside ice giants, such as Neptune, turning into a "diamond (rain) shower."This illustration shows hydrocarbon compounds splitting into carbon and hydrogen inside ice giants, such as Neptune, turning into a "diamond (rain) shower." Photos: Wonders of the universeThis illustration shows hydrocarbon compounds splitting into carbon and hydrogen inside ice giants, such as Neptune, turning into a “diamond (rain) shower.”Hide Caption 5 of 59This striking image is the stellar nursery in the Orion Nebula, where stars are born. The red filament is a stretch of ammonia molecules measuring 50 light-years long. The blue represents the gas of the Orion Nebula. This image is a composite of observation from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explore telescope. "We still don't understand in detail how large clouds of gas in our Galaxy collapse to form new stars," said Rachel Friesen, one of the collaboration's co-Principal Investigators. "But ammonia is an excellent tracer of dense, star-forming gas." This striking image is the stellar nursery in the Orion Nebula, where stars are born. The red filament is a stretch of ammonia molecules measuring 50 light-years long. The blue represents the gas of the Orion Nebula. This image is a composite of observation from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explore telescope. "We still don't understand in detail how large clouds of gas in our Galaxy collapse to form new stars," said Rachel Friesen, one of the collaboration's co-Principal Investigators. "But ammonia is an excellent tracer of dense, star-forming gas." Photos: Wonders of the universeThis striking image is the stellar nursery in the Orion Nebula, where stars are born. The red filament is a stretch of ammonia molecules measuring 50 light-years long. The blue represents the gas of the Orion Nebula. This image is a composite of observation from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explore telescope. “We still don’t understand in detail how large clouds of gas in our Galaxy collapse to form new stars,” said Rachel Friesen, one of the collaboration’s co-Principal Investigators. “But ammonia is an excellent tracer of dense, star-forming gas.” Hide Caption 6 of 59This is an illustration of the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft approaching the sun. The NASA probe <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/31/us/nasa-sun-mission/" target="_blank">will explore the sun's atmosphere</a> in a mission that begins in the summer of 2018.This is an illustration of the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft approaching the sun. The NASA probe <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/31/us/nasa-sun-mission/" target="_blank">will explore the sun's atmosphere</a> in a mission that begins in the summer of 2018. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an illustration of the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft approaching the sun. The NASA probe will explore the sun’s atmosphere in a mission that begins in the summer of 2018.Hide Caption 7 of 59See that tiny dot between Saturn's rings? That's Earth, as seen by the Cassini mission on April 12, 2017. "Cassini was 870 million miles away from Earth when the image was taken," according to NASA. "Although far too small to be visible in the image, the part of Earth facing Cassini at the time was the southern Atlantic Ocean." Much like the famous <a href="https://www.nasa.gov/jpl/voyager/pale-blue-dot-images-turn-25" target="_blank">"pale blue dot"</a> image captured by Voyager 1 in 1990, we are but a point of light when viewed from the furthest planet in the solar system.See that tiny dot between Saturn's rings? That's Earth, as seen by the Cassini mission on April 12, 2017. "Cassini was 870 million miles away from Earth when the image was taken," according to NASA. "Although far too small to be visible in the image, the part of Earth facing Cassini at the time was the southern Atlantic Ocean." Much like the famous <a href="https://www.nasa.gov/jpl/voyager/pale-blue-dot-images-turn-25" target="_blank">"pale blue dot"</a> image captured by Voyager 1 in 1990, we are but a point of light when viewed from the furthest planet in the solar system. Photos: Wonders of the universeSee that tiny dot between Saturn’s rings? That’s Earth, as seen by the Cassini mission on April 12, 2017. “Cassini was 870 million miles away from Earth when the image was taken,” according to NASA. “Although far too small to be visible in the image, the part of Earth facing Cassini at the time was the southern Atlantic Ocean.” Much like the famous “pale blue dot” image captured by Voyager 1 in 1990, we are but a point of light when viewed from the furthest planet in the solar system.Hide Caption 8 of 59NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, using infrared technology, reveals the <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/04/01/us/milky-way-hubble-feat/index.html">density of stars in the Milky Way.</a> According to NASA, the photo -- stitched together from nine images -- contains more than a half-million stars. The star cluster is the densest in the galaxy. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, using infrared technology, reveals the <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/04/01/us/milky-way-hubble-feat/index.html">density of stars in the Milky Way.</a> According to NASA, the photo -- stitched together from nine images -- contains more than a half-million stars. The star cluster is the densest in the galaxy. Photos: Wonders of the universeNASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, using infrared technology, reveals the density of stars in the Milky Way. According to NASA, the photo — stitched together from nine images — contains more than a half-million stars. The star cluster is the densest in the galaxy. Hide Caption 9 of 59This photo of Saturn's large icy moon, Tethys, was taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, which sent back some<a href="http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/27/tech/gallery/cassinis-top-discoveries/" target="_blank"> jaw-dropping images</a> from the ringed planet. This photo of Saturn's large icy moon, Tethys, was taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, which sent back some<a href="http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/27/tech/gallery/cassinis-top-discoveries/" target="_blank"> jaw-dropping images</a> from the ringed planet. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis photo of Saturn’s large icy moon, Tethys, was taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, which sent back some jaw-dropping images from the ringed planet. Hide Caption 10 of 59This is what Earth and its moon look like from Mars. The image is a composite of the best Earth image and the best moon image taken on November 20, 2016, by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The orbiter's camera takes images in three wavelength bands: infrared, red and blue-green. Mars was about 127 million miles from Earth when the images were taken.This is what Earth and its moon look like from Mars. The image is a composite of the best Earth image and the best moon image taken on November 20, 2016, by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The orbiter's camera takes images in three wavelength bands: infrared, red and blue-green. Mars was about 127 million miles from Earth when the images were taken. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is what Earth and its moon look like from Mars. The image is a composite of the best Earth image and the best moon image taken on November 20, 2016, by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The orbiter’s camera takes images in three wavelength bands: infrared, red and blue-green. Mars was about 127 million miles from Earth when the images were taken.Hide Caption 11 of 59PGC 1000714 was initially thought to be a common elliptical galaxy, but a closer analysis revealed the incredibly rare discovery of a Hoag-type galaxy. It has a round core encircled by two detached rings.PGC 1000714 was initially thought to be a common elliptical galaxy, but a closer analysis revealed the incredibly rare discovery of a Hoag-type galaxy. It has a round core encircled by two detached rings. Photos: Wonders of the universePGC 1000714 was initially thought to be a common elliptical galaxy, but a closer analysis revealed the incredibly rare discovery of a Hoag-type galaxy. It has a round core encircled by two detached rings.Hide Caption 12 of 59NASA's Cassini spacecraft took these images of the planet's mysterious hexagon-shaped jetstream in December 2016. The hexagon was discovered in images taken by the Voyager spacecraft in the early 1980s. It's estimated to have a diameter wider than two Earths.NASA's Cassini spacecraft took these images of the planet's mysterious hexagon-shaped jetstream in December 2016. The hexagon was discovered in images taken by the Voyager spacecraft in the early 1980s. It's estimated to have a diameter wider than two Earths. Photos: Wonders of the universeNASA’s Cassini spacecraft took these images of the planet’s mysterious hexagon-shaped jetstream in December 2016. The hexagon was discovered in images taken by the Voyager spacecraft in the early 1980s. It’s estimated to have a diameter wider than two Earths.Hide Caption 13 of 59A dead star gives off a greenish glow in this Hubble Space Telescope image of the Crab Nebula, located about 6,500 light years from Earth in the constellation Taurus. NASA released the image for Halloween 2016 and played up the theme in its press release. The agency said the "ghoulish-looking object still has a pulse." At the center of the Crab Nebula is the crushed core, or "heart" of an exploded star. The heart is spinning 30 times per second and producing a magnetic field that generates 1 trillion volts, NASA said.A dead star gives off a greenish glow in this Hubble Space Telescope image of the Crab Nebula, located about 6,500 light years from Earth in the constellation Taurus. NASA released the image for Halloween 2016 and played up the theme in its press release. The agency said the "ghoulish-looking object still has a pulse." At the center of the Crab Nebula is the crushed core, or "heart" of an exploded star. The heart is spinning 30 times per second and producing a magnetic field that generates 1 trillion volts, NASA said. Photos: Wonders of the universeA dead star gives off a greenish glow in this Hubble Space Telescope image of the Crab Nebula, located about 6,500 light years from Earth in the constellation Taurus. NASA released the image for Halloween 2016 and played up the theme in its press release. The agency said the “ghoulish-looking object still has a pulse.” At the center of the Crab Nebula is the crushed core, or “heart” of an exploded star. The heart is spinning 30 times per second and producing a magnetic field that generates 1 trillion volts, NASA said.Hide Caption 14 of 59Peering through the thick dust clouds of the galactic bulge, an international team of astronomers revealed the unusual mix of stars in the stellar cluster known as Terzan 5. The new results indicate that Terzan 5 is one of the bulge's primordial building blocks, most likely the relic of the very early days of the Milky Way. Peering through the thick dust clouds of the galactic bulge, an international team of astronomers revealed the unusual mix of stars in the stellar cluster known as Terzan 5. The new results indicate that Terzan 5 is one of the bulge's primordial building blocks, most likely the relic of the very early days of the Milky Way. Photos: Wonders of the universePeering through the thick dust clouds of the galactic bulge, an international team of astronomers revealed the unusual mix of stars in the stellar cluster known as Terzan 5. The new results indicate that Terzan 5 is one of the bulge’s primordial building blocks, most likely the relic of the very early days of the Milky Way. Hide Caption 15 of 59An artist's conception of Planet Nine, which would be the farthest planet within our solar system. The similar cluster orbits of extreme objects on the edge of our solar system suggest a massive planet is located there.An artist's conception of Planet Nine, which would be the farthest planet within our solar system. The similar cluster orbits of extreme objects on the edge of our solar system suggest a massive planet is located there. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s conception of Planet Nine, which would be the farthest planet within our solar system. The similar cluster orbits of extreme objects on the edge of our solar system suggest a massive planet is located there.Hide Caption 16 of 59An illustration of the orbits of the new and previously known extremely distant Solar System objects. The clustering of most of their orbits indicates that they are likely be influenced by something massive and very distant, the proposed Planet X.An illustration of the orbits of the new and previously known extremely distant Solar System objects. The clustering of most of their orbits indicates that they are likely be influenced by something massive and very distant, the proposed Planet X. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn illustration of the orbits of the new and previously known extremely distant Solar System objects. The clustering of most of their orbits indicates that they are likely be influenced by something massive and very distant, the proposed Planet X.Hide Caption 17 of 59Say hello to dark galaxy Dragonfly 44. Like our Milky Way, it has a halo of spherical clusters of stars around its core. Say hello to dark galaxy Dragonfly 44. Like our Milky Way, it has a halo of spherical clusters of stars around its core. Photos: Wonders of the universeSay hello to dark galaxy Dragonfly 44. Like our Milky Way, it has a halo of spherical clusters of stars around its core. Hide Caption 18 of 59A classical nova occurs when a white dwarf star gains matter from its secondary star (a red dwarf) over a period of time, causing a thermonuclear reaction on the surface that eventually erupts in a single visible outburst. This creates a 10,000-fold increase in brightness, depicted here in an artist's rendering.A classical nova occurs when a white dwarf star gains matter from its secondary star (a red dwarf) over a period of time, causing a thermonuclear reaction on the surface that eventually erupts in a single visible outburst. This creates a 10,000-fold increase in brightness, depicted here in an artist's rendering. Photos: Wonders of the universeA classical nova occurs when a white dwarf star gains matter from its secondary star (a red dwarf) over a period of time, causing a thermonuclear reaction on the surface that eventually erupts in a single visible outburst. This creates a 10,000-fold increase in brightness, depicted here in an artist’s rendering.Hide Caption 19 of 59Gravitational lensing and space warping are visible in this image of near and distant galaxies captured by Hubble. Gravitational lensing and space warping are visible in this image of near and distant galaxies captured by Hubble. Photos: Wonders of the universeGravitational lensing and space warping are visible in this image of near and distant galaxies captured by Hubble. Hide Caption 20 of 59At the center of our galaxy, the Milky Way, researchers discovered an X-shaped structure within a tightly packed group of stars. At the center of our galaxy, the Milky Way, researchers discovered an X-shaped structure within a tightly packed group of stars. Photos: Wonders of the universeAt the center of our galaxy, the Milky Way, researchers discovered an X-shaped structure within a tightly packed group of stars. Hide Caption 21 of 59Meet UGC 1382: What astronomers thought was a normal elliptical galaxy (left) was actually revealed to be a massive disc galaxy made up of different parts when viewed with ultraviolet and deep optical data (center and right). In a complete reversal of normal galaxy structure, the center is younger than its outer spiral disk. Meet UGC 1382: What astronomers thought was a normal elliptical galaxy (left) was actually revealed to be a massive disc galaxy made up of different parts when viewed with ultraviolet and deep optical data (center and right). In a complete reversal of normal galaxy structure, the center is younger than its outer spiral disk. Photos: Wonders of the universeMeet UGC 1382: What astronomers thought was a normal elliptical galaxy (left) was actually revealed to be a massive disc galaxy made up of different parts when viewed with ultraviolet and deep optical data (center and right). In a complete reversal of normal galaxy structure, the center is younger than its outer spiral disk. Hide Caption 22 of 59NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of the Crab Nebula and its "beating heart," which is a neutron star at the right of the two bright stars in the center of this image. The neutron star pulses 30 times a second. The rainbow colors are visible due to the movement of materials in the nebula occurring during the time-lapse of the image. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of the Crab Nebula and its "beating heart," which is a neutron star at the right of the two bright stars in the center of this image. The neutron star pulses 30 times a second. The rainbow colors are visible due to the movement of materials in the nebula occurring during the time-lapse of the image. Photos: Wonders of the universeNASA’s Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of the Crab Nebula and its “beating heart,” which is a neutron star at the right of the two bright stars in the center of this image. The neutron star pulses 30 times a second. The rainbow colors are visible due to the movement of materials in the nebula occurring during the time-lapse of the image. Hide Caption 23 of 59The Hubble Space Telescope captured an image of a hidden galaxy that is fainter than Andromeda or the Milky Way. This low surface brightness galaxy, called UGC 477, is over 110 million light-years away in the constellation of Pisces.The Hubble Space Telescope captured an image of a hidden galaxy that is fainter than Andromeda or the Milky Way. This low surface brightness galaxy, called UGC 477, is over 110 million light-years away in the constellation of Pisces. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Hubble Space Telescope captured an image of a hidden galaxy that is fainter than Andromeda or the Milky Way. This low surface brightness galaxy, called UGC 477, is over 110 million light-years away in the constellation of Pisces.Hide Caption 24 of 59On April 19, NASA released new images of bright craters on Ceres. This photo shows the Haulani Crater, which has evidence of landslides from its rim. Scientists believe some craters on the dwarf planet are bright because they are relatively new. On April 19, NASA released new images of bright craters on Ceres. This photo shows the Haulani Crater, which has evidence of landslides from its rim. Scientists believe some craters on the dwarf planet are bright because they are relatively new. Photos: Wonders of the universeOn April 19, NASA released new images of bright craters on Ceres. This photo shows the Haulani Crater, which has evidence of landslides from its rim. Scientists believe some craters on the dwarf planet are bright because they are relatively new. Hide Caption 25 of 59This illustration shows the millions of dust grains NASA's Cassini spacecraft has sampled near Saturn. A few dozen of them appear to have come from beyond our solar system.This illustration shows the millions of dust grains NASA's Cassini spacecraft has sampled near Saturn. A few dozen of them appear to have come from beyond our solar system. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis illustration shows the millions of dust grains NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has sampled near Saturn. A few dozen of them appear to have come from beyond our solar system.Hide Caption 26 of 59This image from the VLT Survey Telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile shows a stunning concentration of galaxies known as the Fornax Cluster, which can be found in the Southern Hemisphere. At the center of this cluster, in the middle of the three bright blobs on the left side of the image, lies a cD galaxy -- a galactic cannibal that has grown in size by consuming smaller galaxies.This image from the VLT Survey Telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile shows a stunning concentration of galaxies known as the Fornax Cluster, which can be found in the Southern Hemisphere. At the center of this cluster, in the middle of the three bright blobs on the left side of the image, lies a cD galaxy -- a galactic cannibal that has grown in size by consuming smaller galaxies. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis image from the VLT Survey Telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile shows a stunning concentration of galaxies known as the Fornax Cluster, which can be found in the Southern Hemisphere. At the center of this cluster, in the middle of the three bright blobs on the left side of the image, lies a cD galaxy — a galactic cannibal that has grown in size by consuming smaller galaxies.Hide Caption 27 of 59This image shows the central region of the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The young and dense star cluster R136, which contains hundreds of massive stars, is visible in the lower right of the image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.This image shows the central region of the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The young and dense star cluster R136, which contains hundreds of massive stars, is visible in the lower right of the image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis image shows the central region of the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The young and dense star cluster R136, which contains hundreds of massive stars, is visible in the lower right of the image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.Hide Caption 28 of 59In March 2016, astronomers published a paper on powerful red flashes coming from binary system V404 Cygni in 2015.  This illustration shows a black hole, similar to the one in V404 Cygni, devouring material from an orbiting star. In March 2016, astronomers published a paper on powerful red flashes coming from binary system V404 Cygni in 2015.  This illustration shows a black hole, similar to the one in V404 Cygni, devouring material from an orbiting star. Photos: Wonders of the universeIn March 2016, astronomers published a paper on powerful red flashes coming from binary system V404 Cygni in 2015. This illustration shows a black hole, similar to the one in V404 Cygni, devouring material from an orbiting star. Hide Caption 29 of 59A <a href="http://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1606/" target="_blank">new map of the Milky Way</a> was released February 24, 2016, giving astronomers a full census of the star-forming regions within our own galaxy. The APEX telescope in Chile captured this survey.A <a href="http://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1606/" target="_blank">new map of the Milky Way</a> was released February 24, 2016, giving astronomers a full census of the star-forming regions within our own galaxy. The APEX telescope in Chile captured this survey. Photos: Wonders of the universeA new map of the Milky Way was released February 24, 2016, giving astronomers a full census of the star-forming regions within our own galaxy. The APEX telescope in Chile captured this survey.Hide Caption 30 of 59This image shows the elliptical galaxy NGC 4889, deeply embedded within the Coma galaxy cluster. There is a gigantic supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy.This image shows the elliptical galaxy NGC 4889, deeply embedded within the Coma galaxy cluster. There is a gigantic supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis image shows the elliptical galaxy NGC 4889, deeply embedded within the Coma galaxy cluster. There is a gigantic supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy.Hide Caption 31 of 59An artist's impression of 2MASS J2126, which takens 900,000 years to orbit its star, 1 trillion kilometers away. An artist's impression of 2MASS J2126, which takens 900,000 years to orbit its star, 1 trillion kilometers away. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s impression of 2MASS J2126, which takens 900,000 years to orbit its star, 1 trillion kilometers away. Hide Caption 32 of 59Caltech researchers have found evidence of a giant planet tracing a bizarre, highly elongated orbit in the outer solar system. The object, nicknamed Planet Nine, has a mass about 10 times that of Earth and orbits about 20 times farther from the sun on average than does Neptune. Caltech researchers have found evidence of a giant planet tracing a bizarre, highly elongated orbit in the outer solar system. The object, nicknamed Planet Nine, has a mass about 10 times that of Earth and orbits about 20 times farther from the sun on average than does Neptune. Photos: Wonders of the universeCaltech researchers have found evidence of a giant planet tracing a bizarre, highly elongated orbit in the outer solar system. The object, nicknamed Planet Nine, has a mass about 10 times that of Earth and orbits about 20 times farther from the sun on average than does Neptune. Hide Caption 33 of 59<a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/14/us/possible-powerful-supernova/index.html" target="_blank">An international team of astronomers</a> may have discovered the biggest and brightest supernova ever. The explosion was 570 billion times brighter than the sun and 20 times brighter than all the stars in the Milky Way galaxy combined, according to a statement from The Ohio State University, which is leading the study. Scientists are straining to define the supernova's strength. This image shows an artist's impression of the supernova as it would appear from an exoplanet located about 10,000 light years away.<a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/14/us/possible-powerful-supernova/index.html" target="_blank">An international team of astronomers</a> may have discovered the biggest and brightest supernova ever. The explosion was 570 billion times brighter than the sun and 20 times brighter than all the stars in the Milky Way galaxy combined, according to a statement from The Ohio State University, which is leading the study. Scientists are straining to define the supernova's strength. This image shows an artist's impression of the supernova as it would appear from an exoplanet located about 10,000 light years away. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn international team of astronomers may have discovered the biggest and brightest supernova ever. The explosion was 570 billion times brighter than the sun and 20 times brighter than all the stars in the Milky Way galaxy combined, according to a statement from The Ohio State University, which is leading the study. Scientists are straining to define the supernova’s strength. This image shows an artist’s impression of the supernova as it would appear from an exoplanet located about 10,000 light years away.Hide Caption 34 of 59Astronomers noticed huge waves of <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/06/world/black-hole-burps/index.html">gas being "burped" </a>by the black hole at the center of NGC 5195, a small galaxy 26 million light years from Earth. The team believes the outburst is a consequence of the interaction of NGC 5195 with a nearby galaxy. Astronomers noticed huge waves of <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/06/world/black-hole-burps/index.html">gas being "burped" </a>by the black hole at the center of NGC 5195, a small galaxy 26 million light years from Earth. The team believes the outburst is a consequence of the interaction of NGC 5195 with a nearby galaxy. Photos: Wonders of the universeAstronomers noticed huge waves of gas being “burped” by the black hole at the center of NGC 5195, a small galaxy 26 million light years from Earth. The team believes the outburst is a consequence of the interaction of NGC 5195 with a nearby galaxy. Hide Caption 35 of 59An artist's illustration shows a binary black hole found in the quasar at the center of the Markarian 231 galaxy. Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope  <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/31/us/double-black-hole-nasa-hubble-feat/" target="_blank">discovered the galaxy being powered by two black holes</a> "furiously whirling about each other," the space agency said in a news release.An artist's illustration shows a binary black hole found in the quasar at the center of the Markarian 231 galaxy. Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope  <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/31/us/double-black-hole-nasa-hubble-feat/" target="_blank">discovered the galaxy being powered by two black holes</a> "furiously whirling about each other," the space agency said in a news release. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s illustration shows a binary black hole found in the quasar at the center of the Markarian 231 galaxy. Astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope discovered the galaxy being powered by two black holes “furiously whirling about each other,” the space agency said in a news release.Hide Caption 36 of 59An artist's impression of what a black hole might look like. In February, researchers in China said they had spotted a super-massive black hole 12 billion times the size of the sun.An artist's impression of what a black hole might look like. In February, researchers in China said they had spotted a super-massive black hole 12 billion times the size of the sun. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s impression of what a black hole might look like. In February, researchers in China said they had spotted a super-massive black hole 12 billion times the size of the sun.Hide Caption 37 of 59Are there are oceans on any of Jupiter's moons? The Juice probe shown in this artist's impression aims to find out. Picture courtesy of ESA/AOESAre there are oceans on any of Jupiter's moons? The Juice probe shown in this artist's impression aims to find out. Picture courtesy of ESA/AOES Photos: Wonders of the universeAre there are oceans on any of Jupiter’s moons? The Juice probe shown in this artist’s impression aims to find out. Picture courtesy of ESA/AOESHide Caption 38 of 59Astronomers have discovered powerful auroras on a brown dwarf that is 20 light-years away. This is an artist's concept of the phenomenon. Astronomers have discovered powerful auroras on a brown dwarf that is 20 light-years away. This is an artist's concept of the phenomenon. Photos: Wonders of the universeAstronomers have discovered powerful auroras on a brown dwarf that is 20 light-years away. This is an artist’s concept of the phenomenon. Hide Caption 39 of 59Venus, bottom, and Jupiter shine brightly above Matthews, North Carolina, on Monday, June 29. The apparent close encounter, called a conjunction, has been giving a dazzling display in the summer sky. Although the two planets appear to be close together, in reality they are millions of miles apart.Venus, bottom, and Jupiter shine brightly above Matthews, North Carolina, on Monday, June 29. The apparent close encounter, called a conjunction, has been giving a dazzling display in the summer sky. Although the two planets appear to be close together, in reality they are millions of miles apart. Photos: Wonders of the universeVenus, bottom, and Jupiter shine brightly above Matthews, North Carolina, on Monday, June 29. The apparent close encounter, called a conjunction, has been giving a dazzling display in the summer sky. Although the two planets appear to be close together, in reality they are millions of miles apart.Hide Caption 40 of 59Jupiter's icy moon Europa may be the best place in the solar system to look for extraterrestrial life, according to NASA. The moon is about the size of Earth's moon, and there is evidence it has an ocean beneath its frozen crust that may hold twice as much water as Earth. NASA's 2016 budget includes a request for $30 million to plan a mission to investigate Europa. The image above was taken by the Galileo spacecraft on November 25, 1999. It's a 12-frame mosaic and is considered the the best image yet of the side of Europa that faces Jupiter.Jupiter's icy moon Europa may be the best place in the solar system to look for extraterrestrial life, according to NASA. The moon is about the size of Earth's moon, and there is evidence it has an ocean beneath its frozen crust that may hold twice as much water as Earth. NASA's 2016 budget includes a request for $30 million to plan a mission to investigate Europa. The image above was taken by the Galileo spacecraft on November 25, 1999. It's a 12-frame mosaic and is considered the the best image yet of the side of Europa that faces Jupiter. Photos: Wonders of the universeJupiter’s icy moon Europa may be the best place in the solar system to look for extraterrestrial life, according to NASA. The moon is about the size of Earth’s moon, and there is evidence it has an ocean beneath its frozen crust that may hold twice as much water as Earth. NASA’s 2016 budget includes a request for $30 million to plan a mission to investigate Europa. The image above was taken by the Galileo spacecraft on November 25, 1999. It’s a 12-frame mosaic and is considered the the best image yet of the side of Europa that faces Jupiter.Hide Caption 41 of 59This nebula, or cloud of gas and dust, is called RCW 34 or Gum 19. The brightest areas you can see are where the gas is being heated by young stars. Eventually the gas burst outward like champagne after a bottle is uncorked. Scientists call this champagne flow. This new image of the nebula was captured by the European Space Organization's Very Large Telescope in Chile. RCW 34 is in the constellation Vela in the southern sky. The name means "sails of a ship" in Latin.This nebula, or cloud of gas and dust, is called RCW 34 or Gum 19. The brightest areas you can see are where the gas is being heated by young stars. Eventually the gas burst outward like champagne after a bottle is uncorked. Scientists call this champagne flow. This new image of the nebula was captured by the European Space Organization's Very Large Telescope in Chile. RCW 34 is in the constellation Vela in the southern sky. The name means "sails of a ship" in Latin. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis nebula, or cloud of gas and dust, is called RCW 34 or Gum 19. The brightest areas you can see are where the gas is being heated by young stars. Eventually the gas burst outward like champagne after a bottle is uncorked. Scientists call this champagne flow. This new image of the nebula was captured by the European Space Organization’s Very Large Telescope in Chile. RCW 34 is in the constellation Vela in the southern sky. The name means “sails of a ship” in Latin.Hide Caption 42 of 59The Hubble Space Telescope captured images of Jupiter's three great moons -- Io, Callisto, and Europa -- passing by at once.The Hubble Space Telescope captured images of Jupiter's three great moons -- Io, Callisto, and Europa -- passing by at once. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Hubble Space Telescope captured images of Jupiter’s three great moons — Io, Callisto, and Europa — passing by at once.Hide Caption 43 of 59A massive galaxy cluster known as SDSS J1038+4849 <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2015/02/10/tech/space-smiley-face/index.html">looks like a smiley face</a> in an image captured by the Hubble Telescope. The two glowing eyes are actually two distant galaxies. And what of the smile and the round face? That's a result of what astronomers call "strong gravitational lensing." That happens because the gravitational pull between the two galaxy clusters is so strong it distorts time and space around them.A massive galaxy cluster known as SDSS J1038+4849 <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2015/02/10/tech/space-smiley-face/index.html">looks like a smiley face</a> in an image captured by the Hubble Telescope. The two glowing eyes are actually two distant galaxies. And what of the smile and the round face? That's a result of what astronomers call "strong gravitational lensing." That happens because the gravitational pull between the two galaxy clusters is so strong it distorts time and space around them. Photos: Wonders of the universeA massive galaxy cluster known as SDSS J1038+4849 looks like a smiley face in an image captured by the Hubble Telescope. The two glowing eyes are actually two distant galaxies. And what of the smile and the round face? That’s a result of what astronomers call “strong gravitational lensing.” That happens because the gravitational pull between the two galaxy clusters is so strong it distorts time and space around them.Hide Caption 44 of 59Using powerful optics, astronomers have found a planet-like body, J1407b, with rings 200 times the size of Saturn's. This is an artist's depiction of the rings of planet J1407b, which are eclipsing a star.Using powerful optics, astronomers have found a planet-like body, J1407b, with rings 200 times the size of Saturn's. This is an artist's depiction of the rings of planet J1407b, which are eclipsing a star. Photos: Wonders of the universeUsing powerful optics, astronomers have found a planet-like body, J1407b, with rings 200 times the size of Saturn’s. This is an artist’s depiction of the rings of planet J1407b, which are eclipsing a star.Hide Caption 45 of 59A patch of stars appears to be missing in this image from the La Silla Observatory in Chile. But the stars are actually still there behind a cloud of gas and dust called Lynds Dark Nebula 483. The cloud is about 700 light years from Earth in the constellation Serpens (The Serpent).A patch of stars appears to be missing in this image from the La Silla Observatory in Chile. But the stars are actually still there behind a cloud of gas and dust called Lynds Dark Nebula 483. The cloud is about 700 light years from Earth in the constellation Serpens (The Serpent). Photos: Wonders of the universeA patch of stars appears to be missing in this image from the La Silla Observatory in Chile. But the stars are actually still there behind a cloud of gas and dust called Lynds Dark Nebula 483. The cloud is about 700 light years from Earth in the constellation Serpens (The Serpent).Hide Caption 46 of 59This is the largest Hubble Space Telescope image ever assembled. It's a portion of the galaxy next door, Andromeda (M31).This is the largest Hubble Space Telescope image ever assembled. It's a portion of the galaxy next door, Andromeda (M31). Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is the largest Hubble Space Telescope image ever assembled. It’s a portion of the galaxy next door, Andromeda (M31).Hide Caption 47 of 59NASA has captured a stunning new image of the so-called "Pillars of Creation," one of the space agency's most iconic discoveries. The giant columns of cold gas, in a small region of the Eagle Nebula, were popularized by a similar image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995. NASA has captured a stunning new image of the so-called "Pillars of Creation," one of the space agency's most iconic discoveries. The giant columns of cold gas, in a small region of the Eagle Nebula, were popularized by a similar image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995. Photos: Wonders of the universeNASA has captured a stunning new image of the so-called “Pillars of Creation,” one of the space agency’s most iconic discoveries. The giant columns of cold gas, in a small region of the Eagle Nebula, were popularized by a similar image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995. Hide Caption 48 of 59Astronomers using the Hubble Space pieced together this picture that shows a small section of space in the southern-hemisphere constellation Fornax. Within this deep-space image are 10,000 galaxies, going back in time as far as a few hundred million years after the Big Bang.Astronomers using the Hubble Space pieced together this picture that shows a small section of space in the southern-hemisphere constellation Fornax. Within this deep-space image are 10,000 galaxies, going back in time as far as a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. Photos: Wonders of the universeAstronomers using the Hubble Space pieced together this picture that shows a small section of space in the southern-hemisphere constellation Fornax. Within this deep-space image are 10,000 galaxies, going back in time as far as a few hundred million years after the Big Bang.Hide Caption 49 of 59Planetary nebula Abell 33 appears ring-like in this image, taken using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. The blue bubble was created when an aging star shed its outer layers and a star in the foreground happened to align with it to create a "diamond engagement ring" effect.Planetary nebula Abell 33 appears ring-like in this image, taken using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. The blue bubble was created when an aging star shed its outer layers and a star in the foreground happened to align with it to create a "diamond engagement ring" effect. Photos: Wonders of the universePlanetary nebula Abell 33 appears ring-like in this image, taken using the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope. The blue bubble was created when an aging star shed its outer layers and a star in the foreground happened to align with it to create a “diamond engagement ring” effect.Hide Caption 50 of 59This long-exposure image from the Hubble Telescope is the <a href="http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2014/01/full/" target="_blank">deepest-ever picture taken of a cluster of galaxies. The cluster, </a>called Abell 2744, contains several hundred galaxies as they looked 3.5 billion years ago; the more distant galaxies appear as they did more than 12 billion years ago, not long after the Big Bang. This long-exposure image from the Hubble Telescope is the <a href="http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2014/01/full/" target="_blank">deepest-ever picture taken of a cluster of galaxies. The cluster, </a>called Abell 2744, contains several hundred galaxies as they looked 3.5 billion years ago; the more distant galaxies appear as they did more than 12 billion years ago, not long after the Big Bang. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis long-exposure image from the Hubble Telescope is the deepest-ever picture taken of a cluster of galaxies. The cluster, called Abell 2744, contains several hundred galaxies as they looked 3.5 billion years ago; the more distant galaxies appear as they did more than 12 billion years ago, not long after the Big Bang. Hide Caption 51 of 59NASA's NuSTAR telescope array generated the first map of radioactivity in the remnants of an exploding star, or supernova. Blue in this image of Cassiopeia A represents radioactive material. NASA's NuSTAR telescope array generated the first map of radioactivity in the remnants of an exploding star, or supernova. Blue in this image of Cassiopeia A represents radioactive material. Photos: Wonders of the universeNASA’s NuSTAR telescope array generated the first map of radioactivity in the remnants of an exploding star, or supernova. Blue in this image of Cassiopeia A represents radioactive material. Hide Caption 52 of 59A supernova was spotted on January 21 in Messier 82, one of the nearest big galaxies. This wide view image was taken on January 22.A supernova was spotted on January 21 in Messier 82, one of the nearest big galaxies. This wide view image was taken on January 22. Photos: Wonders of the universeA supernova was spotted on January 21 in Messier 82, one of the nearest big galaxies. This wide view image was taken on January 22.Hide Caption 53 of 59The M82 supernova, seen here, has been designated SN2014J because it is the 10th supernova detected in 2014. At 11.4 million light years from Earth, it is the closest Type Ia supernova recorded since systematic studies with telescopes began in the 1930s.The M82 supernova, seen here, has been designated SN2014J because it is the 10th supernova detected in 2014. At 11.4 million light years from Earth, it is the closest Type Ia supernova recorded since systematic studies with telescopes began in the 1930s. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe M82 supernova, seen here, has been designated SN2014J because it is the 10th supernova detected in 2014. At 11.4 million light years from Earth, it is the closest Type Ia supernova recorded since systematic studies with telescopes began in the 1930s.Hide Caption 54 of 59Is that a giant hand waving at us? Actually, it's what's left of a star that died and exploded a long time ago. Astronomers nicknamed it the "Hand of God." <a href="http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=PIA17566" target="_blank">NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR</a>, took this image in high-energy X-rays, shown in blue. The image was combined with images from another space telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Is that a giant hand waving at us? Actually, it's what's left of a star that died and exploded a long time ago. Astronomers nicknamed it the "Hand of God." <a href="http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=PIA17566" target="_blank">NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR</a>, took this image in high-energy X-rays, shown in blue. The image was combined with images from another space telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Photos: Wonders of the universeIs that a giant hand waving at us? Actually, it’s what’s left of a star that died and exploded a long time ago. Astronomers nicknamed it the “Hand of God.” NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, took this image in high-energy X-rays, shown in blue. The image was combined with images from another space telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Hide Caption 55 of 59The Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy, one of the largest and closest galaxies of its kind. <a href="http://www.spacetelescope.org/news/heic1403/" target="_blank">The center of the galaxy is mysterious</a>, researchers say, because it has a double nucleus -- a supermassive black hole that may be ringed by a lopsided disc of stars, giving it the appearance of a dual core.The Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy, one of the largest and closest galaxies of its kind. <a href="http://www.spacetelescope.org/news/heic1403/" target="_blank">The center of the galaxy is mysterious</a>, researchers say, because it has a double nucleus -- a supermassive black hole that may be ringed by a lopsided disc of stars, giving it the appearance of a dual core. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy, one of the largest and closest galaxies of its kind. The center of the galaxy is mysterious, researchers say, because it has a double nucleus — a supermassive black hole that may be ringed by a lopsided disc of stars, giving it the appearance of a dual core.Hide Caption 56 of 59Hubble scientists say this is the best-ever view of the Tarantula Nebula, which is located in one of our closest galactic neighbors, the Large Magellanic Cloud.Hubble scientists say this is the best-ever view of the Tarantula Nebula, which is located in one of our closest galactic neighbors, the Large Magellanic Cloud. Photos: Wonders of the universeHubble scientists say this is the best-ever view of the Tarantula Nebula, which is located in one of our closest galactic neighbors, the Large Magellanic Cloud.Hide Caption 57 of 59Those spots on our sun appear small, but even a <a href="http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/giant-january-sunspots/" target="_blank">moderate-sized spot is about as big as Earth</a>. They occur when strong magnetic fields poke through the sun's surface and let the area cool in comparison to the surrounding area.Those spots on our sun appear small, but even a <a href="http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/giant-january-sunspots/" target="_blank">moderate-sized spot is about as big as Earth</a>. They occur when strong magnetic fields poke through the sun's surface and let the area cool in comparison to the surrounding area. Photos: Wonders of the universeThose spots on our sun appear small, but even a moderate-sized spot is about as big as Earth. They occur when strong magnetic fields poke through the sun’s surface and let the area cool in comparison to the surrounding area.Hide Caption 58 of 59This Hubble image looks a floating marble or a maybe a giant, disembodied eye. But it's actually a nebula with a giant star at its center. Scientists think the star used to be 20 times more massive than our sun, but it's dying and is destined to go supernova.This Hubble image looks a floating marble or a maybe a giant, disembodied eye. But it's actually a nebula with a giant star at its center. Scientists think the star used to be 20 times more massive than our sun, but it's dying and is destined to go supernova. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis Hubble image looks a floating marble or a maybe a giant, disembodied eye. But it’s actually a nebula with a giant star at its center. Scientists think the star used to be 20 times more massive than our sun, but it’s dying and is destined to go supernova.Hide Caption 59 of 59emirates mars mission hope spacecraft rendermartian crater streaksinterstellar asteroid PHOTO ILLUSTRATION01 zombie star supernova diamond rain planets01 orion nebulaParker Solar Probe spacecraft sun illustration Earth Between Rings of Saturnhubble milky way mar 2016NASA Saturn moon deathstarearth from mars reconnaissance orbiterPGC 1000714 New GalaxyCassini Saturn hexagon collageHubble star ghostly glow01 fossilised star cluster01 extreme objects solar system planet nine02 extreme objects solar system planet ninewonders of the universe dark twinwonders of the universe nova 30721 wonders of the universe 01 wonders of the universe Frankenstein Galaxynasa hubble crab nebulagalaxy UGC 477ceres bright craterscassini saturn dust illustrationFornax Clustergiant starsblack hole 0316Milky Way new photo galaxy orig vstan dlewis_00000000hubble NGC 4889loneliest planet biggest galaxyPlanet 9 superluminous supernova ASASSN-15lh Black hole 3double black hole 0831black holeJuice probe Jupiter01 Brown dwarf aurorasJupiter Venuseuropa 0529RCW 3401 Jupiter moons eclipse 0206Hubble galaxy smiley facegiant planetary ring systemMissing starsAndromeda galaxy02 Pillars of CreationHubble color galaxiesnebula abell 33 EMBARGOED TILL 0409Faraway GalaxiesSupernova Cassiopeia Asupernova SN 2014Jsupernova SN2014Jhand of god 0110Galaxy with two heartsCosmic creeply crawlysun spotsStar Set to ExplodeThe UAE space agency was officially founded in 2014 and has set ambitious targets including an unmanned mission to Mars in 2020 and a colony on the Martian surface by 2117. In September 2017 it unveiled renderings of its Mars Science City project, a simulation center in the desert outside Dubai. Are windowless planes the future of travel?Are windowless planes the future of travel?Are windowless planes the future of travel?Government officials have previously spoken of the space program as a catalyst for the country’s growing STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) sector. “Our primary target is having education and outreach,” Sarah Amiri, UAE minister of state for advanced sciences and science lead at the Emirates Mars Mission, told CNN last year. “It’s creating people that are creative enough to stimulate your economy and to stimulate the growth of your entire nation.”The first piece of the International Space Station was launched in 1998. It has grown to 463 tons, with an internal pressurized volume equal to that of a Boeing 747 airplane. Continuously occupied since November 2000, it has become a vital resource for scientists to understand the effects of long-term space travel on the human body, and how other biological life forms live beyond Earth.

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