(CNN)Away from the protests that have accompanied his visit to Britain and in between diplomatic meetings, US President Donald Trump fitted in a game of golf with his son Eric.

Trump stayed in Turnberry, Scotland — one of his luxury golf resorts — for the weekend before traveling to Finland for a summit Monday with Russian President Vladimir Putin after the US President attended the NATO summit and visited the UK.US President Donald Trump plays golf, wearing a hat with Trump and USA displayed on it.US President Donald Trump plays golf, wearing a hat with Trump and USA displayed on it.US President Donald Trump plays golf, wearing a hat with Trump and USA displayed on it.READ: 10 great courses to play“I have arrived in Scotland and will be at Trump Turnberry for two days of meetings, calls and hopefully, some golf — my primary form of exercise! The weather is beautiful, and this place is incredible!” tweeted Trump Saturday.Trump was playing with his son Eric.Trump was playing with his son Eric.Trump was playing with his son Eric.READ: The definitive golf course bucket listRead MoreHe was was later pictured playing with his son on Turnberry’s Ailsa course. Last year Eric launched the new “King Robert the Bruce” golf course at the Trump Turnberry resort in Ayrshire.As a private citizen, Trump slammed President Barack Obama for hitting the links and made it a campaign issue. However, since being in office himself, Trump has spent more than 100 days at a golf club that bears his name, according to a CNN count.A police officer stands guard outside Trump Turnberry.A police officer stands guard outside Trump Turnberry.A police officer stands guard outside Trump Turnberry.This portion of the US President’s trip to Britain is private and Trump and his wife Melania have no scheduled public events.The 72-year old, whose mother was Scottish, has often spoken of his affection for Scotland and has reportedly invested some £200 million ($287 million) in Trump Turnberry, renovating an area steeped in history. Trump’s name has been emblazoned high and wide at Turnberry in southwestern Scotland, ever since he bought its famed links golf resort in 2014. Trump bought Turnberry in 2014.Trump bought Turnberry in 2014.Trump bought Turnberry in 2014.Turnberry is one of two high-profile courses he owns in Scotland, the other the Trump International Golf Links situated amid the dunes of Aberdeen. Police and security personnel searched vehicles waiting to enter the resort on Saturday, while outside protestors held up an array of anti-Trump placards. At a nearby beach one protestor was wearing a costume in the style of the ‘Handmaid’s Tale.Earlier this year, the dystopian novel’s author Margaret Atwood said the US is becoming more “Gilead-like.” Gilead is a place where women are stripped of rights, separated from their children and have lost the ability to fight for better treatment without endangering their lives.A woman wears a costume in the style of the "Handmaid's Tale" on a beach near Turnberry.A woman wears a costume in the style of the "Handmaid's Tale" on a beach near Turnberry.A woman wears a costume in the style of the “Handmaid’s Tale” on a beach near Turnberry.Turnberry has hosted four Open Championships, most recently in 2009.Turnberry has hosted four Open Championships, most recently in 2009.Turnberry has hosted four Open Championships, most recently in 2009.’Absolutely stunning’Turnberry is a little bit of Britain where the US leader holds sway and the mood was overwhelmingly positive when CNN spoke to residents during the reopening of Turnberry in 2016.“I think it all looks fabulous and will bring a lot of revenue into the village and the surrounding areas,” said nearby B&B owner Christina Auld, describing Trump as a “lovely guy,” having met him on one of his previous trips to the area.Golf began in Scotland some 600 years ago and the country represents a bucket list destination for many dedicated addicts. St. Andrews (pictured) is known as the "Home of Golf" and its Old Course is arguably the game's most hallowed turf.Golf began in Scotland some 600 years ago and the country represents a bucket list destination for many dedicated addicts. St. Andrews (pictured) is known as the "Home of Golf" and its Old Course is arguably the game's most hallowed turf. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Golf began in Scotland some 600 years ago and the country represents a bucket list destination for many dedicated addicts. St. Andrews (pictured) is known as the “Home of Golf” and its Old Course is arguably the game’s most hallowed turf.Hide Caption 1 of 29<strong>St. Andrews:</strong> Golf has been played over the dunes and linksland of St. Andrews since the 15th century. The clubhouse of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club stands sentinel over the unique layout which starts and finishes in town.<strong>St. Andrews:</strong> Golf has been played over the dunes and linksland of St. Andrews since the 15th century. The clubhouse of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club stands sentinel over the unique layout which starts and finishes in town. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses St. Andrews: Golf has been played over the dunes and linksland of St. Andrews since the 15th century. The clubhouse of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club stands sentinel over the unique layout which starts and finishes in town.Hide Caption 2 of 29<strong>St. Andrews: </strong>There are six courses squeezed onto St. Andrews' links, with the Old Course at their heart. The Road Hole 17th and 18th form an iconic finishing stretch.    <strong>St. Andrews: </strong>There are six courses squeezed onto St. Andrews' links, with the Old Course at their heart. The Road Hole 17th and 18th form an iconic finishing stretch.    Photos: Scotland's best golf courses St. Andrews: There are six courses squeezed onto St. Andrews’ links, with the Old Course at their heart. The Road Hole 17th and 18th form an iconic finishing stretch. Hide Caption 3 of 29<strong>St. Andrews:</strong> The Old Course is known for its blind drives over seas of gorse, vast greens, and swales, humps and hollows which require imagination and the ability to use the ground to your advantage.<strong>St. Andrews:</strong> The Old Course is known for its blind drives over seas of gorse, vast greens, and swales, humps and hollows which require imagination and the ability to use the ground to your advantage. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses St. Andrews: The Old Course is known for its blind drives over seas of gorse, vast greens, and swales, humps and hollows which require imagination and the ability to use the ground to your advantage.Hide Caption 4 of 29<strong>Turnberry: </strong>Now<strong> </strong>best known for being owned by US President Donald Trump, Turnberry on Scotland's west coast is a spectacular setting with a famous Edwardian hotel, all of which underwent a multimillion dollar revamp when Trump took over.<strong>Turnberry: </strong>Now<strong> </strong>best known for being owned by US President Donald Trump, Turnberry on Scotland's west coast is a spectacular setting with a famous Edwardian hotel, all of which underwent a multimillion dollar revamp when Trump took over. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Turnberry: Now best known for being owned by US President Donald Trump, Turnberry on Scotland’s west coast is a spectacular setting with a famous Edwardian hotel, all of which underwent a multimillion dollar revamp when Trump took over.Hide Caption 5 of 29<strong>Turnberry: </strong>The Ailsa course occupies a sublime location overlooking the Firth of Clyde with sweeping views to the Ailsa Craig rock and the Isle of Arran. <strong>Turnberry: </strong>The Ailsa course occupies a sublime location overlooking the Firth of Clyde with sweeping views to the Ailsa Craig rock and the Isle of Arran. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Turnberry: The Ailsa course occupies a sublime location overlooking the Firth of Clyde with sweeping views to the Ailsa Craig rock and the Isle of Arran. Hide Caption 6 of 29<strong>Trump International: </strong>Controversy has dogged Donald Trump's new course north of Aberdeen since day one -- with environmental concerns chief among the criticism -- but when it opened in 2012 it was clear that from a golfing point of view it was a new gem. Winding through towering dunes and sunken valleys with tantalizing snapshots of the sea, the course offers the full Scottish links experience, with American hospitality thrown in.<strong>Trump International: </strong>Controversy has dogged Donald Trump's new course north of Aberdeen since day one -- with environmental concerns chief among the criticism -- but when it opened in 2012 it was clear that from a golfing point of view it was a new gem. Winding through towering dunes and sunken valleys with tantalizing snapshots of the sea, the course offers the full Scottish links experience, with American hospitality thrown in. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Trump International: Controversy has dogged Donald Trump’s new course north of Aberdeen since day one — with environmental concerns chief among the criticism — but when it opened in 2012 it was clear that from a golfing point of view it was a new gem. Winding through towering dunes and sunken valleys with tantalizing snapshots of the sea, the course offers the full Scottish links experience, with American hospitality thrown in.Hide Caption 7 of 29<strong>Trump International: </strong>Trump's Aberdeen venture features two out-and-back loops of nine holes in an authentic natural setting. The modest clubhouse at its heart offers several dining options, including the award-winning MacLeod House Restaurant, and a whiskey bar.<strong>Trump International: </strong>Trump's Aberdeen venture features two out-and-back loops of nine holes in an authentic natural setting. The modest clubhouse at its heart offers several dining options, including the award-winning MacLeod House Restaurant, and a whiskey bar. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Trump International: Trump’s Aberdeen venture features two out-and-back loops of nine holes in an authentic natural setting. The modest clubhouse at its heart offers several dining options, including the award-winning MacLeod House Restaurant, and a whiskey bar.Hide Caption 8 of 29<strong>Royal Troon: </strong>This is a classic old links on Scotland's Ayrshire coast north of Turnberry. <strong>Royal Troon: </strong>This is a classic old links on Scotland's Ayrshire coast north of Turnberry. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Royal Troon: This is a classic old links on Scotland’s Ayrshire coast north of Turnberry. Hide Caption 9 of 29<strong>Royal Troon:</strong> The course is famed for its devilish par-three eighth hole, dubbed the "Postage Stamp." It's only 123 yards long but provides a stiff test in the wind, with deep bunkers and a thin green.<strong>Royal Troon:</strong> The course is famed for its devilish par-three eighth hole, dubbed the "Postage Stamp." It's only 123 yards long but provides a stiff test in the wind, with deep bunkers and a thin green. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Royal Troon: The course is famed for its devilish par-three eighth hole, dubbed the “Postage Stamp.” It’s only 123 yards long but provides a stiff test in the wind, with deep bunkers and a thin green.Hide Caption 10 of 29<strong>Carnoustie: </strong>Northeast of Dundee on Scotland's east coast lies the fearsome links of Carnoustie, known as one of the toughest courses in the British Isles. <strong>Carnoustie: </strong>Northeast of Dundee on Scotland's east coast lies the fearsome links of Carnoustie, known as one of the toughest courses in the British Isles. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Carnoustie: Northeast of Dundee on Scotland’s east coast lies the fearsome links of Carnoustie, known as one of the toughest courses in the British Isles. Hide Caption 11 of 29<strong>Carnoustie: </strong>The Championship course is the main pull and is famed as the venue where Jean Van de Velde paddled in the burn during a final-hole collapse during the British Open in 1999.  <strong>Carnoustie: </strong>The Championship course is the main pull and is famed as the venue where Jean Van de Velde paddled in the burn during a final-hole collapse during the British Open in 1999.  Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Carnoustie: The Championship course is the main pull and is famed as the venue where Jean Van de Velde paddled in the burn during a final-hole collapse during the British Open in 1999. Hide Caption 12 of 29<strong>Muirfield: </strong>The jewel in the crown of Scotland's "Golf Coast" of East Lothian, Muirfield is a celebrated if controversial venue. <strong>Muirfield: </strong>The jewel in the crown of Scotland's "Golf Coast" of East Lothian, Muirfield is a celebrated if controversial venue. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Muirfield: The jewel in the crown of Scotland’s “Golf Coast” of East Lothian, Muirfield is a celebrated if controversial venue. Hide Caption 13 of 29<strong>Muirfield: </strong>The testing track near Gullane was mired in controversy before the club finally voted -- at the second attempt -- to admit female members.<strong>Muirfield: </strong>The testing track near Gullane was mired in controversy before the club finally voted -- at the second attempt -- to admit female members. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Muirfield: The testing track near Gullane was mired in controversy before the club finally voted — at the second attempt — to admit female members.Hide Caption 14 of 29<strong>Gullane: </strong>Close to Muirfield is another revered club with three courses. Gullane No.1 is the pick but all offer a satisfying slice of Scottish golf at its finest.<strong>Gullane: </strong>Close to Muirfield is another revered club with three courses. Gullane No.1 is the pick but all offer a satisfying slice of Scottish golf at its finest. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Gullane: Close to Muirfield is another revered club with three courses. Gullane No.1 is the pick but all offer a satisfying slice of Scottish golf at its finest.Hide Caption 15 of 29<strong>North Berwick: </strong>Along the coast from Muirfield lies a quirky, historic masterpiece with views over Bass Rock and an upturned "reddan" style green that has been copied the world over.  <strong>North Berwick: </strong>Along the coast from Muirfield lies a quirky, historic masterpiece with views over Bass Rock and an upturned "reddan" style green that has been copied the world over.  Photos: Scotland's best golf courses North Berwick: Along the coast from Muirfield lies a quirky, historic masterpiece with views over Bass Rock and an upturned “reddan” style green that has been copied the world over. Hide Caption 16 of 29<strong>The Renaissance Club: </strong>Another East Lothian gem with stellar views. <strong>The Renaissance Club: </strong>Another East Lothian gem with stellar views. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses The Renaissance Club: Another East Lothian gem with stellar views. Hide Caption 17 of 29<strong>Royal Dornoch:</strong> On the north shore of the Dornoch Firth on Scotland's northeast coast lies one of its most revered courses. Golf has been played in the seaside town, north of Inverness, since 1616 but the current club has "only" been in existence since 1877. <strong>Royal Dornoch:</strong> On the north shore of the Dornoch Firth on Scotland's northeast coast lies one of its most revered courses. Golf has been played in the seaside town, north of Inverness, since 1616 but the current club has "only" been in existence since 1877. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Royal Dornoch: On the north shore of the Dornoch Firth on Scotland’s northeast coast lies one of its most revered courses. Golf has been played in the seaside town, north of Inverness, since 1616 but the current club has “only” been in existence since 1877. Hide Caption 18 of 29<strong>Royal Dornoch:</strong> The venerable spot hosts two courses -- the Championship and the Struie -- but it is the former track that draws in visitors from around the world. Winding along sinuous sandy shores and among the dunes behind, the fast-running course features humps, hollows, pot bunkers and gorse of a true links test, sandwiched between the sea and purple heather-clad mountains.  <strong>Royal Dornoch:</strong> The venerable spot hosts two courses -- the Championship and the Struie -- but it is the former track that draws in visitors from around the world. Winding along sinuous sandy shores and among the dunes behind, the fast-running course features humps, hollows, pot bunkers and gorse of a true links test, sandwiched between the sea and purple heather-clad mountains.  Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Royal Dornoch: The venerable spot hosts two courses — the Championship and the Struie — but it is the former track that draws in visitors from around the world. Winding along sinuous sandy shores and among the dunes behind, the fast-running course features humps, hollows, pot bunkers and gorse of a true links test, sandwiched between the sea and purple heather-clad mountains. Hide Caption 19 of 29<strong>Kingsbarns: </strong>Just along the coast from St Andrews is <a href="http://www.kingsbarns.com" target="_blank">Kingsbarns</a>, a blockbuster of a modern links in a spectacular cliff-top setting, opened in 2000. Crafted on land that first witnessed golf in 1793,  Kingsbarns quickly went to the top of many wish lists for its rugged scenery, testing championship course and lavish hospitality.<strong>Kingsbarns: </strong>Just along the coast from St Andrews is <a href="http://www.kingsbarns.com" target="_blank">Kingsbarns</a>, a blockbuster of a modern links in a spectacular cliff-top setting, opened in 2000. Crafted on land that first witnessed golf in 1793,  Kingsbarns quickly went to the top of many wish lists for its rugged scenery, testing championship course and lavish hospitality. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Kingsbarns: Just along the coast from St Andrews is Kingsbarns, a blockbuster of a modern links in a spectacular cliff-top setting, opened in 2000. Crafted on land that first witnessed golf in 1793, Kingsbarns quickly went to the top of many wish lists for its rugged scenery, testing championship course and lavish hospitality.Hide Caption 20 of 29<strong>Kingsbarns: </strong>It features as one of three top-notch courses used in the European Tour's annual Dunhill Links Championship along with St Andrews' Old Course and Carnoustie. Nearby are other Scottish links gems such as Crail, Elie, Leven and Lundin Links.   <strong>Kingsbarns: </strong>It features as one of three top-notch courses used in the European Tour's annual Dunhill Links Championship along with St Andrews' Old Course and Carnoustie. Nearby are other Scottish links gems such as Crail, Elie, Leven and Lundin Links.   Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Kingsbarns: It features as one of three top-notch courses used in the European Tour’s annual Dunhill Links Championship along with St Andrews’ Old Course and Carnoustie. Nearby are other Scottish links gems such as Crail, Elie, Leven and Lundin Links. Hide Caption 21 of 29<strong>Castle Stuart:</strong> Although it only opened in 2009, Castle Stuart on the banks of the Moray Firth has become a highlight of golf in the Highlands. The course, overlooked by a towering white art-deco clubhouse, hugs the shore and shelving cliffs on a thin stretch of links land with views to Ben Wyvis mountain, Kessock Bridge, Fort George and Chanonry lighthouse.  <strong>Castle Stuart:</strong> Although it only opened in 2009, Castle Stuart on the banks of the Moray Firth has become a highlight of golf in the Highlands. The course, overlooked by a towering white art-deco clubhouse, hugs the shore and shelving cliffs on a thin stretch of links land with views to Ben Wyvis mountain, Kessock Bridge, Fort George and Chanonry lighthouse.  Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Castle Stuart: Although it only opened in 2009, Castle Stuart on the banks of the Moray Firth has become a highlight of golf in the Highlands. The course, overlooked by a towering white art-deco clubhouse, hugs the shore and shelving cliffs on a thin stretch of links land with views to Ben Wyvis mountain, Kessock Bridge, Fort George and Chanonry lighthouse. Hide Caption 22 of 29<strong>Castle Stuart: </strong>The course is 10 minutes from Inverness airport and within a short drive of Speyside's Malt Whiskey Trail, taking in eight distilleries, including <a href="https://www.glenfiddich.com/" target="_blank">Glenfiddich</a> and <a href="https://www.theglenlivet.com/en-UK" target="_blank">The Glenlivet</a>. Other local courses such as Brora, Nairn and Gulspie are worth a trip.  <strong>Castle Stuart: </strong>The course is 10 minutes from Inverness airport and within a short drive of Speyside's Malt Whiskey Trail, taking in eight distilleries, including <a href="https://www.glenfiddich.com/" target="_blank">Glenfiddich</a> and <a href="https://www.theglenlivet.com/en-UK" target="_blank">The Glenlivet</a>. Other local courses such as Brora, Nairn and Gulspie are worth a trip.  Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Castle Stuart: The course is 10 minutes from Inverness airport and within a short drive of Speyside’s Malt Whiskey Trail, taking in eight distilleries, including Glenfiddich and The Glenlivet. Other local courses such as Brora, Nairn and Gulspie are worth a trip. Hide Caption 23 of 29<strong>Loch Lomond:</strong> Everything about Loch Lomond oozes luxury. From 18th Century Rossdhu House at its center to a spectacular parkland-style course on the banks of the eponymous loch -- Britain's largest expanse of fresh water -- it's a study in elegance. The rub is, it's a private club so access is like a golden ticket from Willy Wonka. <strong>Loch Lomond:</strong> Everything about Loch Lomond oozes luxury. From 18th Century Rossdhu House at its center to a spectacular parkland-style course on the banks of the eponymous loch -- Britain's largest expanse of fresh water -- it's a study in elegance. The rub is, it's a private club so access is like a golden ticket from Willy Wonka. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Loch Lomond: Everything about Loch Lomond oozes luxury. From 18th Century Rossdhu House at its center to a spectacular parkland-style course on the banks of the eponymous loch — Britain’s largest expanse of fresh water — it’s a study in elegance. The rub is, it’s a private club so access is like a golden ticket from Willy Wonka. Hide Caption 24 of 29<strong>Loch Lomond: </strong>It's<strong> </strong>a relatively recent addition to Scotland's golfing repertory, designed by former US golf star Tom Weiskopf and Jay Morrish and opened in 1993, but its setting between mountains and water in the grounds of the ruined medieval castle ensures its a regular in lists of the world's best courses. <strong>Loch Lomond: </strong>It's<strong> </strong>a relatively recent addition to Scotland's golfing repertory, designed by former US golf star Tom Weiskopf and Jay Morrish and opened in 1993, but its setting between mountains and water in the grounds of the ruined medieval castle ensures its a regular in lists of the world's best courses. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Loch Lomond: It’s a relatively recent addition to Scotland’s golfing repertory, designed by former US golf star Tom Weiskopf and Jay Morrish and opened in 1993, but its setting between mountains and water in the grounds of the ruined medieval castle ensures its a regular in lists of the world’s best courses. Hide Caption 25 of 29<strong>Gleneagles: </strong>A one-stop shop for golf and glamor, Gleneagles offers an inland antidote to Scotland's normal diet of windswept links courses. With a five-star hotel, three top-notch courses, bags of country pursuits and Scotland's only restaurant with two Michelin stars -- <a href="https://www.gleneagles.com/dine-drink/andrew-fairlie/" target="_blank">Andrew Fairlie at Gleneagles</a> -- this highland estate northeast of Edinburgh offers plenty of bang for its buck.    <strong>Gleneagles: </strong>A one-stop shop for golf and glamor, Gleneagles offers an inland antidote to Scotland's normal diet of windswept links courses. With a five-star hotel, three top-notch courses, bags of country pursuits and Scotland's only restaurant with two Michelin stars -- <a href="https://www.gleneagles.com/dine-drink/andrew-fairlie/" target="_blank">Andrew Fairlie at Gleneagles</a> -- this highland estate northeast of Edinburgh offers plenty of bang for its buck.    Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Gleneagles: A one-stop shop for golf and glamor, Gleneagles offers an inland antidote to Scotland’s normal diet of windswept links courses. With a five-star hotel, three top-notch courses, bags of country pursuits and Scotland’s only restaurant with two Michelin stars — Andrew Fairlie at Gleneagles — this highland estate northeast of Edinburgh offers plenty of bang for its buck. Hide Caption 26 of 29<strong>Gleneagles: </strong>The Jack Nicklaus-designed Centenary course -- used for the 2014 Ryder Cup -- is the centerpiece of the golf offering, a big, parkland-style layout with soaring views to purple heather-clad mountains. The Gleneagles Hotel opened in 1924, dubbed the "Riviera of the Highlands" and now features 232 bedrooms including 27 suites. More than 50 onsite luxury lodges can also be rented.<strong>Gleneagles: </strong>The Jack Nicklaus-designed Centenary course -- used for the 2014 Ryder Cup -- is the centerpiece of the golf offering, a big, parkland-style layout with soaring views to purple heather-clad mountains. The Gleneagles Hotel opened in 1924, dubbed the "Riviera of the Highlands" and now features 232 bedrooms including 27 suites. More than 50 onsite luxury lodges can also be rented. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Gleneagles: The Jack Nicklaus-designed Centenary course — used for the 2014 Ryder Cup — is the centerpiece of the golf offering, a big, parkland-style layout with soaring views to purple heather-clad mountains. The Gleneagles Hotel opened in 1924, dubbed the “Riviera of the Highlands” and now features 232 bedrooms including 27 suites. More than 50 onsite luxury lodges can also be rented.Hide Caption 27 of 29<strong>Royal Aberdeen: </strong>As with many of Scotland's finest courses, golf in these parts goes way back -- Royal Aberdeen Golf Club was founded on land close to the "Granite City"  in 1780, and is said to be the world's sixth oldest golf club. The historic Balgownie course is the highlight, a classic links layout threading its way through the natural ecosystem of dunes.<strong>Royal Aberdeen: </strong>As with many of Scotland's finest courses, golf in these parts goes way back -- Royal Aberdeen Golf Club was founded on land close to the "Granite City"  in 1780, and is said to be the world's sixth oldest golf club. The historic Balgownie course is the highlight, a classic links layout threading its way through the natural ecosystem of dunes. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Royal Aberdeen: As with many of Scotland’s finest courses, golf in these parts goes way back — Royal Aberdeen Golf Club was founded on land close to the “Granite City” in 1780, and is said to be the world’s sixth oldest golf club. The historic Balgownie course is the highlight, a classic links layout threading its way through the natural ecosystem of dunes.Hide Caption 28 of 29<strong>Machrihanish: </strong>For golf off the beaten track, this historic club in the village of Machrihanish lies on the long finger of the Kintyre peninsula on Scotland's west coast pointing towards Northern Ireland. Machrihanish, with a famous opening shot over the sea, is another links in classic Scottish tradition, with undulating fairways, firm turf, pot bunkers, gorse, wind and vast views towards the islands of Islay, Jura and Gigha. <strong>Machrihanish: </strong>For golf off the beaten track, this historic club in the village of Machrihanish lies on the long finger of the Kintyre peninsula on Scotland's west coast pointing towards Northern Ireland. Machrihanish, with a famous opening shot over the sea, is another links in classic Scottish tradition, with undulating fairways, firm turf, pot bunkers, gorse, wind and vast views towards the islands of Islay, Jura and Gigha. Photos: Scotland's best golf courses Machrihanish: For golf off the beaten track, this historic club in the village of Machrihanish lies on the long finger of the Kintyre peninsula on Scotland’s west coast pointing towards Northern Ireland. Machrihanish, with a famous opening shot over the sea, is another links in classic Scottish tradition, with undulating fairways, firm turf, pot bunkers, gorse, wind and vast views towards the islands of Islay, Jura and Gigha. Hide Caption 29 of 29Best golf courses British OpenBest British Open golf courses Scotland St Andrews Old Course R&A CLaret JugBest British Open golf courses Scotland St Andrews Old Course general viewBest British Open golf courses Scotland St Andrews Old Course shadowsTurnberry 9th hole newBest British Open courses TurnberryBest golf courses Scotland Trump InternationalBest golf courses Scotland Trump International 2Best British Open golf courses Scotland Royal Troon clubhouse Royal Troon 8th holeBest British Open courses CarnoustieBritish Open golf courses Carnoustie 01Best British Open golf courses Muirfield clubhouseBest British Open golf courses Scotland Muirfield general viewBest golf courses Scotland GullaneBest golf courses Scotland North BerwickBest golf courses Scotland The RenaissanceBest golf courses Scotland Royal DornochRoyal Dornoch 10th hole newBest golf courses Scotland Kingsbarns 1Best golf courses Scotland Kingsbarns 3Best golf courses Scotland Castle Stuart 2Best golf courses Scotland Castle Stuart 1Best golf course Scotland Loch Lomond House 2Best golf courses Scotland Loch Lomond sixth hole Best golf courses Scotland Gleneagles generalBest golf courses Scotland Gleneagles first Ryder CupBest golf courses Scotland Royal AberdeenBest golf courses Scotland MachrihanishWillie McDines, a veteran caddie master at Turnberry, admitted he’d initially harbored misgivings about the American’s involvement, but had quickly changed his mind. “When they started talking about redoing the course, I was saying to myself … ‘are they going to ruin this?’,” McDines told CNN. “When you see (the results), it’s absolutely stunning. Mr Trump has done exactly what he said he would.””I’ve seen quite a lot of comings and goings here over the years,” he added, “but this is the best one yet.”Trump was heavily involved in the redesign of the 112-year-old resort, paying particular attention to the Ailsa course, host of the British Open on four occasions since 1977. It was on these links that the Tom Watson defeated Jack Nicklaus in the legendary “Duel in the Sun.” And it was here that the billionaire businessman and would-be President oversaw the radical transformation of the ninth hole, reworking it from a par four into a spectacular par three that stretches across the water alongside the famous Turnberry lighthouse.Trump’s hope was that the revamped course would soon play host to the Open — golf’s oldest major tournament — once again. Protests & ‘ownership issues’Except it hasn’t quite worked out that way. Despite near-universal approval of the course itself, Trump’s political views have proven far more divisive, and it now seems highly improbable the Open will be staged there during Trump’s tenure. “It would be very complex having an Open at Turnberry at the moment,” said R&A chief executive Martin Slumbers in February this year, alluding to “ownership issues.” It’s also looking increasingly unlikely that the sea breeze will be the only thing that greets him when he arrives on the South Ayrshire coast. Around a dozen activists from “Stand Up to Racism Scotland” (SUTR) took to the course Thursday, armed with placards and banners insisting the resort’s owner is “not welcome.” Activists from Stand Up to Racism Scotland (SUTR) stage a protest at the Trump Turnberry resort ahead of the US president's arrival in the UK. Activists from Stand Up to Racism Scotland (SUTR) stage a protest at the Trump Turnberry resort ahead of the US president's arrival in the UK. Activists from Stand Up to Racism Scotland (SUTR) stage a protest at the Trump Turnberry resort ahead of the US president’s arrival in the UK. They shouted “lock up Trump, let the children go,” according to national newspaper The Scotsman, condemning the separation of families at the US Mexico border. SUTR spokesperson Charlotte Ahmed said she hoped “tens of thousands” would take to the streets of Scotland to join the protests later in the weekend. Visit CNN.com/sport for more news and featuresHe claims to have a handicap of 2.8, and Donald Trump isn't the first US President to have enjoyed time on the golf course. He claims to have a handicap of 2.8, and Donald Trump isn't the first US President to have enjoyed time on the golf course. Photos: US presidents and golfHe claims to have a handicap of 2.8, and Donald Trump isn’t the first US President to have enjoyed time on the golf course. Hide Caption 1 of 12Sixteen of the last 19 presidents have played golf. Here, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden putt on the White House putting green in 2009.Sixteen of the last 19 presidents have played golf. Here, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden putt on the White House putting green in 2009. Photos: US presidents and golfSixteen of the last 19 presidents have played golf. Here, President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden putt on the White House putting green in 2009.Hide Caption 2 of 12President George W. Bush tips his hat after teeing off on the first hole at the Andrews Air Force Base golf course on September 28, 2003.President George W. Bush tips his hat after teeing off on the first hole at the Andrews Air Force Base golf course on September 28, 2003. Photos: US presidents and golfPresident George W. Bush tips his hat after teeing off on the first hole at the Andrews Air Force Base golf course on September 28, 2003.Hide Caption 3 of 12President Bill Clinton watches as his first tee shot heads off the course and into the trees during a round of golf at the Farm Neck Golf Club of Martha's Vineyard during a family vacation on August 23, 1999. He took a second shot and it landed in the same area. Clinton was known for taking Mulligans, a do-over shot in a friendly match. The press even coined a term for them -- "Billigans."President Bill Clinton watches as his first tee shot heads off the course and into the trees during a round of golf at the Farm Neck Golf Club of Martha's Vineyard during a family vacation on August 23, 1999. He took a second shot and it landed in the same area. Clinton was known for taking Mulligans, a do-over shot in a friendly match. The press even coined a term for them -- "Billigans." Photos: US presidents and golfPresident Bill Clinton watches as his first tee shot heads off the course and into the trees during a round of golf at the Farm Neck Golf Club of Martha’s Vineyard during a family vacation on August 23, 1999. He took a second shot and it landed in the same area. Clinton was known for taking Mulligans, a do-over shot in a friendly match. The press even coined a term for them — “Billigans.”Hide Caption 4 of 12President George H.W. Bush tees off on the fourth hole at Spyglass Golf Course during the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am on February 28, 1994, in California.President George H.W. Bush tees off on the fourth hole at Spyglass Golf Course during the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am on February 28, 1994, in California. Photos: US presidents and golfPresident George H.W. Bush tees off on the fourth hole at Spyglass Golf Course during the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am on February 28, 1994, in California.Hide Caption 5 of 12President Ronald Reagan putts a golf ball on Air Force One on November 16, 1985.President Ronald Reagan putts a golf ball on Air Force One on November 16, 1985. Photos: US presidents and golfPresident Ronald Reagan putts a golf ball on Air Force One on November 16, 1985.Hide Caption 6 of 12President Gerald Ford plays golf during a working vacation on Mackinac Island in Michigan on July 13, 1975.President Gerald Ford plays golf during a working vacation on Mackinac Island in Michigan on July 13, 1975. Photos: US presidents and golfPresident Gerald Ford plays golf during a working vacation on Mackinac Island in Michigan on July 13, 1975.Hide Caption 7 of 12President Richard Nixon and Attorney General John Mitchell play golf at the Los Angeles Country Club in 1969.President Richard Nixon and Attorney General John Mitchell play golf at the Los Angeles Country Club in 1969. Photos: US presidents and golfPresident Richard Nixon and Attorney General John Mitchell play golf at the Los Angeles Country Club in 1969.Hide Caption 8 of 12President Dwight D. Eisenhower drives down the fairway at Turnberry golf course during a weekend stay at Culzean Castle on the Ayrshire coast of Scotland on September 5, 1959. Eisenhower often carried a club in the Oval Office and took swings while dictating to his secretary.President Dwight D. Eisenhower drives down the fairway at Turnberry golf course during a weekend stay at Culzean Castle on the Ayrshire coast of Scotland on September 5, 1959. Eisenhower often carried a club in the Oval Office and took swings while dictating to his secretary. Photos: US presidents and golfPresident Dwight D. Eisenhower drives down the fairway at Turnberry golf course during a weekend stay at Culzean Castle on the Ayrshire coast of Scotland on September 5, 1959. Eisenhower often carried a club in the Oval Office and took swings while dictating to his secretary.Hide Caption 9 of 12President Warren Harding, left, gets ready for gold on the Piping Rock Golf Links on Long Island in 1921. He's with Howard Whitney, second from left, president of the U.S. Golf Association, Percy Pyne and American industrialist J. Leonard Replogle.President Warren Harding, left, gets ready for gold on the Piping Rock Golf Links on Long Island in 1921. He's with Howard Whitney, second from left, president of the U.S. Golf Association, Percy Pyne and American industrialist J. Leonard Replogle. Photos: US presidents and golfPresident Warren Harding, left, gets ready for gold on the Piping Rock Golf Links on Long Island in 1921. He’s with Howard Whitney, second from left, president of the U.S. Golf Association, Percy Pyne and American industrialist J. Leonard Replogle.Hide Caption 10 of 12President Woodrow Wilson plays golf in 1916. He played more golf than any other president, reportedly logging more than 1,000 rounds in his two terms.President Woodrow Wilson plays golf in 1916. He played more golf than any other president, reportedly logging more than 1,000 rounds in his two terms. Photos: US presidents and golfPresident Woodrow Wilson plays golf in 1916. He played more golf than any other president, reportedly logging more than 1,000 rounds in his two terms.Hide Caption 11 of 12President William Taft, the 27th U.S. president, putts on the green in Chevy Chase, Maryland, on June 28, 1909. He is said to be the first presidential golfer.President William Taft, the 27th U.S. president, putts on the green in Chevy Chase, Maryland, on June 28, 1909. He is said to be the first presidential golfer. Photos: US presidents and golfPresident William Taft, the 27th U.S. president, putts on the green in Chevy Chase, Maryland, on June 28, 1909. He is said to be the first presidential golfer.Hide Caption 12 of 12donald trump golfpresidents golf 01presidents golf 02presidents golf 03presidents golf 04presidents golf 05presidents golf 06presidents golf 07presidents golf 08gallery harding and otherspresidents golf 10presidents golf 11There were whispers of discontent in May when Turnberry banned the country’s best-selling soft drink, Irn-Bru, over fears it would stain the resort’s luxury carpets. There may be even greater outcry when Trump takes to his own fairways this weekend.

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