(CNN)All eyes will be on Bryson DeChambeau at the Masters over the next few days.

A golfer the likes of which the sport has never been seen before, DeChambeau’s dedication to trialing new technologies and methods has shot him to the top of the sport, and has ensured he is one of the favorites at Augusta. But in an already strange year for sport due to the coronavirus pandemic, this year’s Masters — which has been delayed from its traditional April slot — will look completely different from previous tournaments. Gone are the patrons who typically line the fairways and the azaleas that are so associated with the Masters will be an autumnal brown rather than their vibrant green. Even for a veteran of the tournament like Tiger Woods — who has won the Masters five times — playing this year is going to be “very different.”Read More”I have been up here in the fall a few times and have played it, and it’s been like this,” the defending Master champion said during a press conference earlier this week. “But we’ve never played a Masters like this. So it’s going to be very different for all of us. I may never have the opportunity to take the [green] jacket off property again, and so this means a lot to me.”READ: Forty years on after Seve Ballesteros’ magnificent Masters triumphThe opening major of the golf season is the Masters from Augusta, Georgia every April, although it is being held in November in 2020 because of the coronavirus pandemic. It's a spring rite, steeped in tradition and layered in rich sporting history and drama. It's an event that attracts even non-golfers because of the sublime beauty of the course. Click through the gallery for an A-Z of the Masters.The opening major of the golf season is the Masters from Augusta, Georgia every April, although it is being held in November in 2020 because of the coronavirus pandemic. It's a spring rite, steeped in tradition and layered in rich sporting history and drama. It's an event that attracts even non-golfers because of the sublime beauty of the course. Click through the gallery for an A-Z of the Masters. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosThe Masters, Augusta – The opening major of the golf season is the Masters from Augusta, Georgia every April, although it is being held in November in 2020 because of the coronavirus pandemic. It’s a spring rite, steeped in tradition and layered in rich sporting history and drama. It’s an event that attracts even non-golfers because of the sublime beauty of the course. Click through the gallery for an A-Z of the Masters.Hide Caption 1 of 27The revered course has hosted the year's opening major -- and the only one of the big four events to be played at the same course every year -- since 1934. A is also for the <strong>azaleas</strong> which traditionally blossom during Masters week and for <strong>Amen Corner</strong>, the infamous stretch of holes incorporating the 11th, the treacherous short 12th and the tee shot on the par-five 13th. The revered course has hosted the year's opening major -- and the only one of the big four events to be played at the same course every year -- since 1934. A is also for the <strong>azaleas</strong> which traditionally blossom during Masters week and for <strong>Amen Corner</strong>, the infamous stretch of holes incorporating the 11th, the treacherous short 12th and the tee shot on the par-five 13th. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosA is for Augusta National – The revered course has hosted the year’s opening major — and the only one of the big four events to be played at the same course every year — since 1934. A is also for the azaleas which traditionally blossom during Masters week and for Amen Corner, the infamous stretch of holes incorporating the 11th, the treacherous short 12th and the tee shot on the par-five 13th. Hide Caption 2 of 27The Georgian greensward is an oasis among the urban landscape of Augusta, Georgia's second city on the banks of the Savannah River. The bars, burger joints and shopping malls of neighboring Washington Road are in stark contrast to the golfing dreamscape over the fence. B is also for Seve <strong>Ballesteros, </strong>the Spaniard who opened the European floodgates with wins in 1980 and 1983.    The Georgian greensward is an oasis among the urban landscape of Augusta, Georgia's second city on the banks of the Savannah River. The bars, burger joints and shopping malls of neighboring Washington Road are in stark contrast to the golfing dreamscape over the fence. B is also for Seve <strong>Ballesteros, </strong>the Spaniard who opened the European floodgates with wins in 1980 and 1983.    Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosB is for Beauty – The Georgian greensward is an oasis among the urban landscape of Augusta, Georgia’s second city on the banks of the Savannah River. The bars, burger joints and shopping malls of neighboring Washington Road are in stark contrast to the golfing dreamscape over the fence. B is also for Seve Ballesteros, the Spaniard who opened the European floodgates with wins in 1980 and 1983. Hide Caption 3 of 27Augusta's caddies are instantly recognizable by their white jump suits. Before 1983, players had to use a club caddie, all of whom were local black men. Since then players have used their usual tour caddies, but they must still don the white suit and green cap. Augusta's caddies are instantly recognizable by their white jump suits. Before 1983, players had to use a club caddie, all of whom were local black men. Since then players have used their usual tour caddies, but they must still don the white suit and green cap. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosC is for Caddies – Augusta’s caddies are instantly recognizable by their white jump suits. Before 1983, players had to use a club caddie, all of whom were local black men. Since then players have used their usual tour caddies, but they must still don the white suit and green cap. Hide Caption 4 of 27The hallowed property is governed by its own strict rules such as no running or cell phones, but on the flip side traditions exist such as the practice of placing your green Masters chair at your preferred spot and being able to return to your vacant seat hours later.The hallowed property is governed by its own strict rules such as no running or cell phones, but on the flip side traditions exist such as the practice of placing your green Masters chair at your preferred spot and being able to return to your vacant seat hours later. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosD is for Dos and Don'ts – The hallowed property is governed by its own strict rules such as no running or cell phones, but on the flip side traditions exist such as the practice of placing your green Masters chair at your preferred spot and being able to return to your vacant seat hours later.Hide Caption 5 of 27Former US President Dwight D. Eisenhower was a member of  Augusta National and several landmarks of his era remain, including Ike's Pond, the fishing lake he championed that is the focal point of the Par-3 Contest. Eisenhower's white cabin also sits near the clubhouse.Former US President Dwight D. Eisenhower was a member of  Augusta National and several landmarks of his era remain, including Ike's Pond, the fishing lake he championed that is the focal point of the Par-3 Contest. Eisenhower's white cabin also sits near the clubhouse. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosE is for Eisenhower – Former US President Dwight D. Eisenhower was a member of Augusta National and several landmarks of his era remain, including Ike’s Pond, the fishing lake he championed that is the focal point of the Par-3 Contest. Eisenhower’s white cabin also sits near the clubhouse.Hide Caption 6 of 27Visitors to Augusta National are known as patrons -- not fans or spectators or the crowd. Tickets are like gold dust, but a limited number of practice round tickets and tournament days are available through a yearly ballot. The waiting list for weekly tournament badges closed years ago.Visitors to Augusta National are known as patrons -- not fans or spectators or the crowd. Tickets are like gold dust, but a limited number of practice round tickets and tournament days are available through a yearly ballot. The waiting list for weekly tournament badges closed years ago. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosF is for Fans (make that Patrons) – Visitors to Augusta National are known as patrons — not fans or spectators or the crowd. Tickets are like gold dust, but a limited number of practice round tickets and tournament days are available through a yearly ballot. The waiting list for weekly tournament badges closed years ago.Hide Caption 7 of 27Rory McIlroy just needs the Masters to complete the Grand Slam of all four of golf's major titles. The Northern Irishman blew a four-shot lead at Augusta in 2011, but having won four majors in the meantime returns for his fifth shot at the Grand Slam this week. Only five others have achieved the feat -- Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan, Gary Player, Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods. G is also for <strong>greens</strong> -- the slick, sloping putting surfaces are infamous. Rory McIlroy just needs the Masters to complete the Grand Slam of all four of golf's major titles. The Northern Irishman blew a four-shot lead at Augusta in 2011, but having won four majors in the meantime returns for his fifth shot at the Grand Slam this week. Only five others have achieved the feat -- Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan, Gary Player, Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods. G is also for <strong>greens</strong> -- the slick, sloping putting surfaces are infamous. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosG is for Grand Slam – Rory McIlroy just needs the Masters to complete the Grand Slam of all four of golf’s major titles. The Northern Irishman blew a four-shot lead at Augusta in 2011, but having won four majors in the meantime returns for his fifth shot at the Grand Slam this week. Only five others have achieved the feat — Gene Sarazen, Ben Hogan, Gary Player, Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods. G is also for greens — the slick, sloping putting surfaces are infamous. Hide Caption 8 of 27Augusta National was created by Scottish golf course architect Dr. Alister Mackenzie and co-founder Bobby Jones and opened in 1933 on land that was once the site of Fruitlands Nursery. During World War II the land was briefly given over to turkey and cattle farming. Augusta National was created by Scottish golf course architect Dr. Alister Mackenzie and co-founder Bobby Jones and opened in 1933 on land that was once the site of Fruitlands Nursery. During World War II the land was briefly given over to turkey and cattle farming. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosH is for History – Augusta National was created by Scottish golf course architect Dr. Alister Mackenzie and co-founder Bobby Jones and opened in 1933 on land that was once the site of Fruitlands Nursery. During World War II the land was briefly given over to turkey and cattle farming. Hide Caption 9 of 27South African Gary Player -- pictured here in 2014 with Jack Nicklaus (left) and the late Arnold Palmer -- was the first international champion in 1961. Since then the Masters has been won 21 times by overseas players. The US counts for 60 wins from 37 different players.South African Gary Player -- pictured here in 2014 with Jack Nicklaus (left) and the late Arnold Palmer -- was the first international champion in 1961. Since then the Masters has been won 21 times by overseas players. The US counts for 60 wins from 37 different players. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosI is for Internationals – South African Gary Player — pictured here in 2014 with Jack Nicklaus (left) and the late Arnold Palmer — was the first international champion in 1961. Since then the Masters has been won 21 times by overseas players. The US counts for 60 wins from 37 different players.Hide Caption 10 of 27The tropical-weight emerald blazer is worn by only Augusta National members and Masters champions. It was first introduced for members in 1937 and ordered from Brooks Uniform Company in New York. Sam Snead was the first winner to receive a jacket and honorary membership in 1949. The reigning Masters champion can take it home for a year, then it must be kept at the club.The tropical-weight emerald blazer is worn by only Augusta National members and Masters champions. It was first introduced for members in 1937 and ordered from Brooks Uniform Company in New York. Sam Snead was the first winner to receive a jacket and honorary membership in 1949. The reigning Masters champion can take it home for a year, then it must be kept at the club. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosJ is for Jacket, as in green – The tropical-weight emerald blazer is worn by only Augusta National members and Masters champions. It was first introduced for members in 1937 and ordered from Brooks Uniform Company in New York. Sam Snead was the first winner to receive a jacket and honorary membership in 1949. The reigning Masters champion can take it home for a year, then it must be kept at the club.Hide Caption 11 of 27The saying goes the Masters doesn't begin until the back nine on Sunday. It starts with one of the hardest holes on the course in the 10th and then enters Amen Corner with the equally tough 11th and then the booby trap of the short 12th. But the long 15th (pictured) is key -- big moves can be made with eagles here. Anything less than a birdie and you will likely go backwards. The saying goes the Masters doesn't begin until the back nine on Sunday. It starts with one of the hardest holes on the course in the 10th and then enters Amen Corner with the equally tough 11th and then the booby trap of the short 12th. But the long 15th (pictured) is key -- big moves can be made with eagles here. Anything less than a birdie and you will likely go backwards. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosK is for Key holes – The saying goes the Masters doesn’t begin until the back nine on Sunday. It starts with one of the hardest holes on the course in the 10th and then enters Amen Corner with the equally tough 11th and then the booby trap of the short 12th. But the long 15th (pictured) is key — big moves can be made with eagles here. Anything less than a birdie and you will likely go backwards. Hide Caption 12 of 27The exclusive driveway to Augusta's historic clubhouse is framed by dozens of magnolia trees. Only members and Masters competitors are allowed to access this revered entrance which gives on to the Founder's Circle and then the whitewashed concrete clubhouse, built in 1854. The exclusive driveway to Augusta's historic clubhouse is framed by dozens of magnolia trees. Only members and Masters competitors are allowed to access this revered entrance which gives on to the Founder's Circle and then the whitewashed concrete clubhouse, built in 1854. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosL is for Lane, as in Magnolia Lane – The exclusive driveway to Augusta’s historic clubhouse is framed by dozens of magnolia trees. Only members and Masters competitors are allowed to access this revered entrance which gives on to the Founder’s Circle and then the whitewashed concrete clubhouse, built in 1854. Hide Caption 13 of 27Popular left-hander Phil Mickelson is one of 17 players to have won multiple Masters titles. The three-time champion won the first of his five major titles at Augusta in 2004 after three straight third places. Even at 50, Mickelson remains a Masters threat. Popular left-hander Phil Mickelson is one of 17 players to have won multiple Masters titles. The three-time champion won the first of his five major titles at Augusta in 2004 after three straight third places. Even at 50, Mickelson remains a Masters threat. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosM is for Mickelson – Popular left-hander Phil Mickelson is one of 17 players to have won multiple Masters titles. The three-time champion won the first of his five major titles at Augusta in 2004 after three straight third places. Even at 50, Mickelson remains a Masters threat. Hide Caption 14 of 27The most successful player at the Masters is Jack Nicklaus, whose six Green Jackets remains the record. The 80-year-old is now an honorary starter along with Gary Player, following the death of four-time champion Arnold Palmer in 2016. The most successful player at the Masters is Jack Nicklaus, whose six Green Jackets remains the record. The 80-year-old is now an honorary starter along with Gary Player, following the death of four-time champion Arnold Palmer in 2016. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosN is for Nicklaus, as in Jack – The most successful player at the Masters is Jack Nicklaus, whose six Green Jackets remains the record. The 80-year-old is now an honorary starter along with Gary Player, following the death of four-time champion Arnold Palmer in 2016. Hide Caption 15 of 27The famous old oak tree on the course side of the clubhouse is an iconic landmark and the traditional meeting place for the game's movers and shakers and media types with the correct credential. A familiar refrain of Masters week is: "Meet you under the tree."The famous old oak tree on the course side of the clubhouse is an iconic landmark and the traditional meeting place for the game's movers and shakers and media types with the correct credential. A familiar refrain of Masters week is: "Meet you under the tree." Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosO is for Oak tree – The famous old oak tree on the course side of the clubhouse is an iconic landmark and the traditional meeting place for the game’s movers and shakers and media types with the correct credential. A familiar refrain of Masters week is: “Meet you under the tree.”Hide Caption 16 of 27Perhaps the most famous short hole in golf, the par-3 12th sits at the heart of Amen Corner. Like a wolf in sheep's clothing, it is just 155 yards long, but Rae's Creek looms large in front and a devilish wind always swirling around the trees makes club selection tricky.Perhaps the most famous short hole in golf, the par-3 12th sits at the heart of Amen Corner. Like a wolf in sheep's clothing, it is just 155 yards long, but Rae's Creek looms large in front and a devilish wind always swirling around the trees makes club selection tricky. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosP is for Par 3s, notably the 12th – Perhaps the most famous short hole in golf, the par-3 12th sits at the heart of Amen Corner. Like a wolf in sheep’s clothing, it is just 155 yards long, but Rae’s Creek looms large in front and a devilish wind always swirling around the trees makes club selection tricky.Hide Caption 17 of 27Modern media are housed in a recently built state-of-the-art facility at the far end of the practice range, but in days gone by the stories from Augusta were crafted in a corrugated metal Quonset Hut.  Modern media are housed in a recently built state-of-the-art facility at the far end of the practice range, but in days gone by the stories from Augusta were crafted in a corrugated metal Quonset Hut.  Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosQ is for Quonset Hut – Modern media are housed in a recently built state-of-the-art facility at the far end of the practice range, but in days gone by the stories from Augusta were crafted in a corrugated metal Quonset Hut. Hide Caption 18 of 27When the excitement rises on a Sunday afternoon and the patrons reach fever pitch, the roars reverberate around the towering pines which act like a giant organ reflecting the noise all over the course. A Phil Mickelson roar stands out, but a roar for Tiger Woods is like no other.  When the excitement rises on a Sunday afternoon and the patrons reach fever pitch, the roars reverberate around the towering pines which act like a giant organ reflecting the noise all over the course. A Phil Mickelson roar stands out, but a roar for Tiger Woods is like no other.  Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosR is for Roars – When the excitement rises on a Sunday afternoon and the patrons reach fever pitch, the roars reverberate around the towering pines which act like a giant organ reflecting the noise all over the course. A Phil Mickelson roar stands out, but a roar for Tiger Woods is like no other. Hide Caption 19 of 27Jordan Spieth was on a fast track to being crowned the new king of Augusta following his wire-to-wire victory in 2015 and dominance for three rounds in 2016. He was still clear with nine holes to play before famously self destructing with two balls in the water on 12. The American has struggled of late and is down to 33rd in the world, but in five Masters appearances he has won, finished second twice, come third and 11th.Jordan Spieth was on a fast track to being crowned the new king of Augusta following his wire-to-wire victory in 2015 and dominance for three rounds in 2016. He was still clear with nine holes to play before famously self destructing with two balls in the water on 12. The American has struggled of late and is down to 33rd in the world, but in five Masters appearances he has won, finished second twice, come third and 11th. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosS is for Spieth – Jordan Spieth was on a fast track to being crowned the new king of Augusta following his wire-to-wire victory in 2015 and dominance for three rounds in 2016. He was still clear with nine holes to play before famously self destructing with two balls in the water on 12. The American has struggled of late and is down to 33rd in the world, but in five Masters appearances he has won, finished second twice, come third and 11th.Hide Caption 20 of 27The Masters is forward looking but rooted in tradition, such as the pre-tournament Par-3 Contest, in which friends and family members caddie for the players and hit the occasional shot. Jack Nicklaus' grandson Gary made a hole in one last year. Other traditions include the Champions Dinner, in which the holder chooses the menu and hosts the evening on the Tuesday of Masters weekThe Masters is forward looking but rooted in tradition, such as the pre-tournament Par-3 Contest, in which friends and family members caddie for the players and hit the occasional shot. Jack Nicklaus' grandson Gary made a hole in one last year. Other traditions include the Champions Dinner, in which the holder chooses the menu and hosts the evening on the Tuesday of Masters week Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosT is for Tradition – The Masters is forward looking but rooted in tradition, such as the pre-tournament Par-3 Contest, in which friends and family members caddie for the players and hit the occasional shot. Jack Nicklaus’ grandson Gary made a hole in one last year. Other traditions include the Champions Dinner, in which the holder chooses the menu and hosts the evening on the Tuesday of Masters weekHide Caption 21 of 27When Jordan Spieth won in 2015 he equaled Tiger Woods' 1997 record for the lowest winning score at 18 under par.  When Jordan Spieth won in 2015 he equaled Tiger Woods' 1997 record for the lowest winning score at 18 under par.  Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosU is for Under par – When Jordan Spieth won in 2015 he equaled Tiger Woods’ 1997 record for the lowest winning score at 18 under par. Hide Caption 22 of 27Augusta's vistas are consistently spell-binding with the pines framing the holes and the lush grass, ice white of the bunkers and explosions of color from the flowers and patrons adding to the allure.   Augusta's vistas are consistently spell-binding with the pines framing the holes and the lush grass, ice white of the bunkers and explosions of color from the flowers and patrons adding to the allure.   Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosV is for Views – Augusta’s vistas are consistently spell-binding with the pines framing the holes and the lush grass, ice white of the bunkers and explosions of color from the flowers and patrons adding to the allure. Hide Caption 23 of 27Who else? Tiger Woods changed golf when he won his first major by a record 12 shots in 1997. He went on to win three further Green Jackets, the last of which came in 2005 after a famous chip-in on the 16th. The  43-year-old is fit again after multiple back surgeries, and among the widely tipped contenders.  Who else? Tiger Woods changed golf when he won his first major by a record 12 shots in 1997. He went on to win three further Green Jackets, the last of which came in 2005 after a famous chip-in on the 16th. The  43-year-old is fit again after multiple back surgeries, and among the widely tipped contenders.  Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosW is for Woods – Who else? Tiger Woods changed golf when he won his first major by a record 12 shots in 1997. He went on to win three further Green Jackets, the last of which came in 2005 after a famous chip-in on the 16th. The 43-year-old is fit again after multiple back surgeries, and among the widely tipped contenders. Hide Caption 24 of 27Winning the Masters requires a game in mint condition and a bit of something special. Think Tiger Woods' chip-in on the 16th in 2005, or Phil Mickelson's shot threaded through trees on the 13th in 2010. Or what about Bubba Watson's banana ball from the woods on the 10th to clinch a play off in 2012 (pictured)? Winning the Masters requires a game in mint condition and a bit of something special. Think Tiger Woods' chip-in on the 16th in 2005, or Phil Mickelson's shot threaded through trees on the 13th in 2010. Or what about Bubba Watson's banana ball from the woods on the 10th to clinch a play off in 2012 (pictured)? Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosX is for X-factor – Winning the Masters requires a game in mint condition and a bit of something special. Think Tiger Woods’ chip-in on the 16th in 2005, or Phil Mickelson’s shot threaded through trees on the 13th in 2010. Or what about Bubba Watson’s banana ball from the woods on the 10th to clinch a play off in 2012 (pictured)? Hide Caption 25 of 27Tiger Woods' 1997 win for the first of 14 majors so far made him the youngest Masters champion at the age of 21.Tiger Woods' 1997 win for the first of 14 majors so far made him the youngest Masters champion at the age of 21. Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosY is for Youngest winner – Tiger Woods’ 1997 win for the first of 14 majors so far made him the youngest Masters champion at the age of 21.Hide Caption 26 of 27For many players, winning the Masters represents the zenith of their career. Phil Mickelson's jump for joy in 2004 at his 11th attempt kick started an era which yielded further victories in 2006 and 2010.  For many players, winning the Masters represents the zenith of their career. Phil Mickelson's jump for joy in 2004 at his 11th attempt kick started an era which yielded further victories in 2006 and 2010.  Photos: The Masters: A-Z in photosZ is for Zenith – For many players, winning the Masters represents the zenith of their career. Phil Mickelson’s jump for joy in 2004 at his 11th attempt kick started an era which yielded further victories in 2006 and 2010. Hide Caption 27 of 27Masters photos A-z Augusta 12th Rory McIlroy cardMasters photos A-Z Tiger Woods Azaleas Masters photos A-Z beauty 13th Justin RoseMasters photos A-Z caddies 13th Patrick ReedMasters photos A-Z dos donts chairsAugusta par three courseMAsters photos A-z patrons Augusta Masters photos A-Z Rory Mcilroy01 Augusta National Golf course FILEMasters photos a-z international gary playerMasters photos A-Z Sergio Garcia Patrick Reed green jacketMasters photos a-z key holes 15th AugustaMasters photos A-Z Magnolia Lane clubhouseMasters photos A-Z Phil MickelsonMasters photos a-z par 3 Jack NicklausMasters photos A-Z oak tree clubhouseMasters photos A-Z par three 12th Augusta02 Augusta National FILE RESTRICTEDAugusta National 16th hole roarsMasters photos A-Z Jordan Spieth 13th hole AugustaMasters photos a-z par 3 traditionMasters photos A-z Jordan Spieth record under parMasters photos a-z views 10th AugustaTiger_Woods_career_gallery_7Bubba Watson 10thMasters photos A-Z Tiger Woods 1997 green jacketPhil Mickelson Masters jump 2004 AugustaAdmiration from a greatWoods has been in possession of the iconic green jacket for an unprecedented 19 months due to the competition’s postponement. However, he has struggled for form, with just five top-10 finishes on the PGA Tour in that time. DeChambeau, on the other hand, has found his stride and, to coin a boxing expression, his “fighting” weight — 40 additional pounds of weight added on during lockdown has allowed him to hit the ball further and brought about his maiden major win at the US Open at Winged Foot in September. His desire for self-improvement was the subject of praise from Woods, who himself was at the forefront of pushing the game forward in his early 20s. DeChambeau plays his tee shot during a practice round prior to the Masters.DeChambeau plays his tee shot during a practice round prior to the Masters.DeChambeau plays his tee shot during a practice round prior to the Masters.”Back then, there wasn’t the technology to optimize our tee shots and optimize the driver yet,” said Woods. “We were just coming out of basically the persimmon days and coming into metal. More guys were switching over to graphite instead of steel. “The wound ball was very spinny, and heads were very small, so it was important to hit the ball in the middle of the face. “I happened to have speed and I happened to hit the ball in the middle of the face and was able to have a little bit of an advantage over the guys. “But now you have the ability to optimize one club, and to be able to use that driver as a weapon, to hit it basically as far as you possibly can, we just didn’t have the technology to be able to optimize that.” And the combination of DeChambeau’s willingness to work tirelessly in the gym and the advancement in golfing technology has allowed the 27-year-old to push boundaries, something Woods called “incredible.” DeChambeau putts on the 10th green during a practice round for the Masters.DeChambeau putts on the 10th green during a practice round for the Masters.DeChambeau putts on the 10th green during a practice round for the Masters.Visit CNN.com/sport for more news, features, and videos“Bryson has put in the time,” added Woods. “He’s put in the work. What he’s done in the gym has been incredible and what he’s done on the range and what he’s done with his entire team to be able to optimize that one club and transform his game and the ability to hit the ball as far as he has and in as short a span as he has, it’s never been done before. “You know, I had speed, and as you say, in 1997, I hit it far. As I got bigger and I filled out and tried to get stronger, it was to not hit the ball further. It was to be more consistent and to be able to practice longer. “Actually, I got a little bit shorter as I got into my mid 20s and late 20s. Probably the most speed I ever had, I was 20 years old. So 21, I still had a little bit more speed, but as I got a little bit bigger, I didn’t hit it as far, but I got better.”

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