(CNN)Pope Francis is having cards printed and distributed showing a 1945 photo of victims of the nuclear bombing of Nagasaki along with the words “the fruit of war.”

The photo captures a boy carrying his dead brother on his shoulders while he waits for his turn at the crematory. It was taken by US Marine photographer Joe O’Donnell shortly after the bombs were dropped at the end of World War II.The leader of the world’s Roman Catholics asked that “the fruit of war” be written in the back of the card along with his signature “Franciscus.”A short caption explains the content and origin of the photo, it reads in part: “The young boy’s sadness is expressed only in his gesture of biting his lips which are oozing blood.”The Pope's signature is above a description of the image.The Pope's signature is above a description of the image.The Pope’s signature is above a description of the image.After the bombs dropped by the US on Nagasaki and Hiroshima forced Japan’s surrender and ended World War II in 1945, O’Donnell spent four years documenting the aftermath in the two cities, according to Library of Congress records.Read MoreThe United States detonates the world's first atomic bomb at a test site in New Mexico on July 16, 1945. Less than a month later, atomic bombs were dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The devastation led to Japan's unconditional surrender and brought an end to World War II.The United States detonates the world's first atomic bomb at a test site in New Mexico on July 16, 1945. Less than a month later, atomic bombs were dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The devastation led to Japan's unconditional surrender and brought an end to World War II. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombThe United States detonates the world’s first atomic bomb at a test site in New Mexico on July 16, 1945. Less than a month later, atomic bombs were dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The devastation led to Japan’s unconditional surrender and brought an end to World War II.Hide Caption 1 of 19In 1939, physicists Albert Einstein, left, and Leo Szilard drafted a letter to U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, urging him to research atomic bombs before the Germans could build one first. By 1942, the United States had approved the top-secret Manhattan Project to build a nuclear reactor and assemble an atomic bomb.In 1939, physicists Albert Einstein, left, and Leo Szilard drafted a letter to U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, urging him to research atomic bombs before the Germans could build one first. By 1942, the United States had approved the top-secret Manhattan Project to build a nuclear reactor and assemble an atomic bomb. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombIn 1939, physicists Albert Einstein, left, and Leo Szilard drafted a letter to U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, urging him to research atomic bombs before the Germans could build one first. By 1942, the United States had approved the top-secret Manhattan Project to build a nuclear reactor and assemble an atomic bomb.Hide Caption 2 of 19In 1942, U.S. Army Col. Leslie R. Groves, left, was appointed to head the Manhattan Project. On the right is physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer, who led the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico.In 1942, U.S. Army Col. Leslie R. Groves, left, was appointed to head the Manhattan Project. On the right is physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer, who led the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombIn 1942, U.S. Army Col. Leslie R. Groves, left, was appointed to head the Manhattan Project. On the right is physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer, who led the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico.Hide Caption 3 of 19Los Alamos workers pose on a platform stacked with 100 tons of TNT. It was to be used to gauge radioactive fallout. Los Alamos workers pose on a platform stacked with 100 tons of TNT. It was to be used to gauge radioactive fallout. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombLos Alamos workers pose on a platform stacked with 100 tons of TNT. It was to be used to gauge radioactive fallout. Hide Caption 4 of 19The Manhattan Project also involved research facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Hanford, Washington. Billboards, like this one in Oak Ridge, reminded workers of the project's top-secret nature.The Manhattan Project also involved research facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Hanford, Washington. Billboards, like this one in Oak Ridge, reminded workers of the project's top-secret nature. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombThe Manhattan Project also involved research facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Hanford, Washington. Billboards, like this one in Oak Ridge, reminded workers of the project’s top-secret nature.Hide Caption 5 of 19Workers in New Mexico attach a bomb to a tower two days before its successful test in July 1945.Workers in New Mexico attach a bomb to a tower two days before its successful test in July 1945. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombWorkers in New Mexico attach a bomb to a tower two days before its successful test in July 1945.Hide Caption 6 of 19Trinity was the code name of the test bomb, which was dropped in the Jornada del Muerto desert.Trinity was the code name of the test bomb, which was dropped in the Jornada del Muerto desert. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombTrinity was the code name of the test bomb, which was dropped in the Jornada del Muerto desert.Hide Caption 7 of 19Air Force Col. Paul Tibbetts waves from the pilot's seat of the Enola Gay moments before takeoff on August 6, 1945. A short time later, the plane's crew dropped the first atomic bomb in combat, instantly killing 80,000 people in Hiroshima.Air Force Col. Paul Tibbetts waves from the pilot's seat of the Enola Gay moments before takeoff on August 6, 1945. A short time later, the plane's crew dropped the first atomic bomb in combat, instantly killing 80,000 people in Hiroshima. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombAir Force Col. Paul Tibbetts waves from the pilot’s seat of the Enola Gay moments before takeoff on August 6, 1945. A short time later, the plane’s crew dropped the first atomic bomb in combat, instantly killing 80,000 people in Hiroshima.Hide Caption 8 of 19An aerial photograph of Hiroshima shortly after the atomic bomb, nicknamed "Little Boy," was dropped.An aerial photograph of Hiroshima shortly after the atomic bomb, nicknamed "Little Boy," was dropped. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombAn aerial photograph of Hiroshima shortly after the atomic bomb, nicknamed “Little Boy,” was dropped.Hide Caption 9 of 19U.S. President Harry Truman, aboard a U.S. Navy cruiser, reads reports of the Hiroshima bombing. Eight days earlier, Truman had warned Japan that the country would be destroyed if it did not surrender unconditionally.U.S. President Harry Truman, aboard a U.S. Navy cruiser, reads reports of the Hiroshima bombing. Eight days earlier, Truman had warned Japan that the country would be destroyed if it did not surrender unconditionally. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombU.S. President Harry Truman, aboard a U.S. Navy cruiser, reads reports of the Hiroshima bombing. Eight days earlier, Truman had warned Japan that the country would be destroyed if it did not surrender unconditionally.Hide Caption 10 of 19A white silhouette on a Hiroshima bridge shows an area that wasn't scorched by the bomb. It was reportedly the outline of a person's shadow -- someone who was shielded from the blast's heat rays by another person.A white silhouette on a Hiroshima bridge shows an area that wasn't scorched by the bomb. It was reportedly the outline of a person's shadow -- someone who was shielded from the blast's heat rays by another person. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombA white silhouette on a Hiroshima bridge shows an area that wasn’t scorched by the bomb. It was reportedly the outline of a person’s shadow — someone who was shielded from the blast’s heat rays by another person.Hide Caption 11 of 19An elderly victim is covered with flies in a makeshift hospital in Hiroshima.An elderly victim is covered with flies in a makeshift hospital in Hiroshima. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombAn elderly victim is covered with flies in a makeshift hospital in Hiroshima.Hide Caption 12 of 19A worker stands next to an atomic bomb, nicknamed "Fat Man," hours before it was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9, 1945.A worker stands next to an atomic bomb, nicknamed "Fat Man," hours before it was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9, 1945. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombA worker stands next to an atomic bomb, nicknamed “Fat Man,” hours before it was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9, 1945.Hide Caption 13 of 19This photo was taken about six miles from the scene of the Nagasaki explosion. According to the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum, photographer Hiromichi Matsuda took this photograph 15 minutes after the attack.This photo was taken about six miles from the scene of the Nagasaki explosion. According to the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum, photographer Hiromichi Matsuda took this photograph 15 minutes after the attack. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombThis photo was taken about six miles from the scene of the Nagasaki explosion. According to the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum, photographer Hiromichi Matsuda took this photograph 15 minutes after the attack.Hide Caption 14 of 19Survivors of the Nagasaki bomb walk through the destruction as fire rages in the background.Survivors of the Nagasaki bomb walk through the destruction as fire rages in the background. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombSurvivors of the Nagasaki bomb walk through the destruction as fire rages in the background.Hide Caption 15 of 19A woman and a child walk in Nagasaki on the day of the bombing. More than 70,000 people there were killed instantly.A woman and a child walk in Nagasaki on the day of the bombing. More than 70,000 people there were killed instantly. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombA woman and a child walk in Nagasaki on the day of the bombing. More than 70,000 people there were killed instantly.Hide Caption 16 of 19Members of the White House Press Corps rush to telephones after Truman announced Japan's surrender on August 15, 1945.Members of the White House Press Corps rush to telephones after Truman announced Japan's surrender on August 15, 1945. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombMembers of the White House Press Corps rush to telephones after Truman announced Japan’s surrender on August 15, 1945.Hide Caption 17 of 19An aerial view of Hiroshima three weeks after the atomic bomb.An aerial view of Hiroshima three weeks after the atomic bomb. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombAn aerial view of Hiroshima three weeks after the atomic bomb.Hide Caption 18 of 19Soldiers and sailors on the USS Missouri watch as Japan's formal surrender is signed in Tokyo Bay on September 2, 1945.Soldiers and sailors on the USS Missouri watch as Japan's formal surrender is signed in Tokyo Bay on September 2, 1945. Photos: The first use of the atomic bombSoldiers and sailors on the USS Missouri watch as Japan’s formal surrender is signed in Tokyo Bay on September 2, 1945.Hide Caption 19 of 1901 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED02 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED05 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED06 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED07 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED08 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED09 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED10 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED11 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED15 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED12 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED13 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED16 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED17 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos18 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED19 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED20 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED14 hiroshima 70th anniversary photos RESTRICTED21 hiroshima 70th anniversary photosHis photos were published in the book titled “Japan 1945: A US. Marine’s Photographs from Ground Zero.”CNN’s senior Vatican analyst John Allen wrote on his website: “Though release of the photo in the run-up to New Year’s does not add anything substantive to the pontiff’s positions, it’s nevertheless the first time Francis has asked that a specific image be circulated in the holiday season, suggesting he believes its message is especially relevant at the moment.”The Pope has previously condemned nuclear weapons and highlighted the impact of conflict on children, Allen wrote.

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