(CNN)Middle Tennessee remains deep in recovery mode after last week’s deadly and destructive flooding, and it appears the remnants of Hurricane Ida will offer the area little quarter.

Ida, now a tropical storm, is forecast to move through central Mississippi on Monday afternoon before picking up speed Monday night as it tracks across northeastern Mississippi and into the Tennessee Valley. “Hurricane Ida’s remnants may reach the west and middle portions of Tennessee on Monday evening through Tuesday with heavy rain and flash flooding possible over the same areas as last weekend’s flood emergency,” the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency warned. Adds the National Weather Service, “Severe weather cannot be ruled out overnight mainly south of I-40.”People walk across a washed-out road in Waverly, Tennessee, on Sunday, August 22.People walk across a washed-out road in Waverly, Tennessee, on Sunday, August 22. Photos: Deadly flooding in Middle TennesseePeople walk across a washed-out road in Waverly, Tennessee, on Sunday, August 22.Hide Caption 1 of 12Cars that were swept up in floodwaters sit on the banks of Waverly's Blue Creek on Monday, August 23.Cars that were swept up in floodwaters sit on the banks of Waverly's Blue Creek on Monday, August 23. Photos: Deadly flooding in Middle TennesseeCars that were swept up in floodwaters sit on the banks of Waverly’s Blue Creek on Monday, August 23.Hide Caption 2 of 12Dustin Shadownes of the Ashland City Fire Department is joined by a cadaver dog as he searches a Waverly creek for missing people on August 23.Dustin Shadownes of the Ashland City Fire Department is joined by a cadaver dog as he searches a Waverly creek for missing people on August 23. Photos: Deadly flooding in Middle TennesseeDustin Shadownes of the Ashland City Fire Department is joined by a cadaver dog as he searches a Waverly creek for missing people on August 23.Hide Caption 3 of 12John Curtis, co-owner of the Waverly Cash Saver grocery store, walks through his damaged store on Sunday, August 22.John Curtis, co-owner of the Waverly Cash Saver grocery store, walks through his damaged store on Sunday, August 22. Photos: Deadly flooding in Middle TennesseeJohn Curtis, co-owner of the Waverly Cash Saver grocery store, walks through his damaged store on Sunday, August 22.Hide Caption 4 of 12Kalyn Clayton, 16, surveys the damaged kitchen of a Waverly home while volunteering with his church youth group on August 22. Kalyn Clayton, 16, surveys the damaged kitchen of a Waverly home while volunteering with his church youth group on August 22. Photos: Deadly flooding in Middle TennesseeKalyn Clayton, 16, surveys the damaged kitchen of a Waverly home while volunteering with his church youth group on August 22. Hide Caption 5 of 12A building is left in the middle of the road in Waverly.A building is left in the middle of the road in Waverly. Photos: Deadly flooding in Middle TennesseeA building is left in the middle of the road in Waverly.Hide Caption 6 of 12Brian Mitchell, right, is joined by friend Chris Hoover while looking through his mother-in-law's damaged Waverly home on August 22.Brian Mitchell, right, is joined by friend Chris Hoover while looking through his mother-in-law's damaged Waverly home on August 22. Photos: Deadly flooding in Middle TennesseeBrian Mitchell, right, is joined by friend Chris Hoover while looking through his mother-in-law’s damaged Waverly home on August 22.Hide Caption 7 of 12Navy Haley helps remove belongings from a home while volunteering in Waverly.Navy Haley helps remove belongings from a home while volunteering in Waverly. Photos: Deadly flooding in Middle TennesseeNavy Haley helps remove belongings from a home while volunteering in Waverly.Hide Caption 8 of 12Vehicles are submerged in Trace Creek as a result of the severe weather in Waverly.Vehicles are submerged in Trace Creek as a result of the severe weather in Waverly. Photos: Deadly flooding in Middle TennesseeVehicles are submerged in Trace Creek as a result of the severe weather in Waverly.Hide Caption 9 of 12Anthony and Vanessa Yates find their wedding wreath in their flood-damaged home in Waverly, Tennessee, on August 22. Vanessa was at home with her 4-month-old daughter when the floodwaters rapidly rose. They were rescued by Vanessa's brother-in-law, Alan Wallace, who <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/24/us/tennessee-flooding-tuesday/index.html" target="_blank">paddled his kayak</a> to their house.Anthony and Vanessa Yates find their wedding wreath in their flood-damaged home in Waverly, Tennessee, on August 22. Vanessa was at home with her 4-month-old daughter when the floodwaters rapidly rose. They were rescued by Vanessa's brother-in-law, Alan Wallace, who <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/24/us/tennessee-flooding-tuesday/index.html" target="_blank">paddled his kayak</a> to their house. Photos: Deadly flooding in Middle TennesseeAnthony and Vanessa Yates find their wedding wreath in their flood-damaged home in Waverly, Tennessee, on August 22. Vanessa was at home with her 4-month-old daughter when the floodwaters rapidly rose. They were rescued by Vanessa’s brother-in-law, Alan Wallace, who paddled his kayak to their house.Hide Caption 10 of 12Cars and debris are stacked high along Simpson Avenue in Waverly.Cars and debris are stacked high along Simpson Avenue in Waverly. Photos: Deadly flooding in Middle TennesseeCars and debris are stacked high along Simpson Avenue in Waverly.Hide Caption 11 of 12Josh Whitlock and Stacy Mathieson look through what is left of their home after it burned down following flooding in Waverly.Josh Whitlock and Stacy Mathieson look through what is left of their home after it burned down following flooding in Waverly. Photos: Deadly flooding in Middle TennesseeJosh Whitlock and Stacy Mathieson look through what is left of their home after it burned down following flooding in Waverly.Hide Caption 12 of 1209 tennessee flooding 082212 tennessee flooding 082313 tennessee flooding 082311 tennessee flooding 082202 tennessee flooding 082201 tennessee flooding 082210 tennessee flooding 082204 tennessee flooding 082203 tennessee flooding 082205 tennessee flooding 082207 tennessee flooding 082208 tennessee flooding 0822Residents should already be making preparations: weighing the flood risk in their area, creating an evacuation plan and ensuring they have multiple means of receiving weather information, such as the ReadyTN app or a weather radio. Read MoreIn Waverly, one of the hardest-hit Tennessee cities in the recent flooding, the Humphreys County Emergency Management Agency was simultaneously offering grief counseling and barbecue for those impacted last week, while offering tarps and bottled water to those bracing for the next deluge.”Residents are encouraged to cover openings in damaged structures and secure their belongings in preparation for the incoming weather,” the county EMA said in a news release. If there’s any silver lining to the storm presently headed toward the heart of Tennessee, it’s that this week’s rainwaters may be more forgiving than the last.”According to the National Weather Service localized flooding will be possible but is not expected to be the magnitude of last week’s flooding,” Humphreys County EMA spokeswoman Grey Collier said in a news release. Just four days ago, the agency announced it was suspending search efforts after identifying 20 people killed as a result of water topping the banks of area waterways and inundating the county. Among them were 7-month-old twins swept out of their father’s arms by floodwaters and a 55-year-old woman who livestreamed the flooding on her Facebook page. Woman live streams flooding moments before being swept awayWoman live streams flooding moments before being swept awayWoman live streams flooding moments before being swept awayJUST WATCHEDWoman live streams flooding moments before being swept awayReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Woman live streams flooding moments before being swept away 02:30″We’re sad that our count is now at 20, but we’re glad that our families now have the closure that they need to move on,” Waverly Police and Fire Chief Grant Gillespie said. “We no longer expect them to find any more victims, but we are still on standby if somebody is reported missing.”Ten miles east in McEwen, meteorologists measured more than 17 inches of rain on August 21 alone — which Krissy Hurley, a meteorologist in the National Weather Service’s Nashville office, said amounted to roughly four months of rain in a single day. Meteorologists had originally predicted 6 inches of rain in the area, though higher totals were always a possibility. “We were getting rainfall rates of 3 inches per hour for three hours straight,” she said. “It’s an unheard of, astronomical, type of statistic to see after the fact.”Now, with no time to dry out, the ground remains wet as the storms spinning off Ida’s core threaten to bring 3 to 6 more inches of rain to the Tennessee Valley, Ohio Valley, Central and Southern Appalachians and the Mid-Atlantic.For Middle Tennessee, which is facing a National Weather Service warning of possible “considerable flash flooding,” the rain will continue into Wednesday, forecasters say. It was like a tidal wave: Woman describes losing home to Tennessee floodsIt was like a tidal wave: Woman describes losing home to Tennessee floodsIt was like a tidal wave: Woman describes losing home to Tennessee floodsJUST WATCHEDIt was like a tidal wave: Woman describes losing home to Tennessee floodsReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

It was like a tidal wave: Woman describes losing home to Tennessee floods 02:28That includes Hickman, Houston and Dickson counties, which were also hammered with high water last week. Like McEwen, Centerville also saw more than 17 inches of rain in one day, and an area outside the city of Dickson registered almost 14 inches.National Guardsmen equipped with a Blackhawk helicopter an tactical vehicles were activated to assist in rescue efforts. The flooding pulled houses off their foundations and carried away automobiles and other belongings. Almost 300 homes were destroyed. Electricity and cell service were knocked out. Schools were rendered unusable. Residents described fast-rising waters that left them no time to collect themselves or their belongings. Casey Hipshire likened it to “a tidal wave that just came over the road and into my yard.”She, her husband and her 8-year-old son escaped the chest-high water rushing into their McEwen home, leaving them with “a lot of heartache,” she said. “My house fell off the foundation while were still in it, so we had to break the window in the kitchen and crawl out of it and get up on the roof as fast as we could,” Hipshire said.

Source Link:
https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/30/us/tennessee-hurricane-ida-flooding/index.html

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