(CNN)John Lewis’ tireless push for civil rights did not die with him on July 17, 2020. The longtime representative of Georgia’s 5th congressional district spent his lifetime fighting for the oppressed and forgotten. And he wrote the playbook for the next generation to get into what he called “good trouble, necessary trouble.”

On September 27, CNN Films premieres “John Lewis: Good Trouble,” a documentary chronicling the late congressman’s 60-plus years of social activism. In light of the film’s debut, Impact Your World has gathered some ways you can stir up some “good trouble” of your own through charities and causes John Lewis supported.See the trailer for CNN Films 'John Lewis: Good Trouble'See the trailer for CNN Films 'John Lewis: Good Trouble'U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) listens during a news conference September 25, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.JUST WATCHEDSee the trailer for CNN Films ‘John Lewis: Good Trouble’ReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

See the trailer for CNN Films ‘John Lewis: Good Trouble’ 00:30Voting

Your vote matters. If it didn’t, why would some people keep trying to take it away? #goodtrouble

— John Lewis (@repjohnlewis) July 3, 2018 It wouldn’t be right if we didn’t start by suggesting you exercise your right to vote. The former congressman made voting rights a crucial part of his advocacy throughout his life. He believed the right to vote was one of American’s most precious and sacred blessings. There is no better way to honor his life and legacy by hitting the polls on November 3.Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureRead MoreThe Smithsonian's <a href="https://nmaahc.si.edu/" target="_blank">National Museum of African American History and Culture</a> in Washington opens on September 24, after a dedication ceremony with President Barack Obama. The winning building design was by Freelon Adjaye Bond/Smithgroup, a four-firm team. It was built on the last available land on the National Mall.The Smithsonian's <a href="https://nmaahc.si.edu/" target="_blank">National Museum of African American History and Culture</a> in Washington opens on September 24, after a dedication ceremony with President Barack Obama. The winning building design was by Freelon Adjaye Bond/Smithgroup, a four-firm team. It was built on the last available land on the National Mall. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureOpening day – The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington opens on September 24, after a dedication ceremony with President Barack Obama. The winning building design was by Freelon Adjaye Bond/Smithgroup, a four-firm team. It was built on the last available land on the National Mall.Hide Caption 1 of 20The museum's 12 inaugural exhibitions are organized around themes of history, community and culture. One traces the history of the design and building of the museum. Click through the gallery to see a sampling of the 11 other installations. The museum's 12 inaugural exhibitions are organized around themes of history, community and culture. One traces the history of the design and building of the museum. Click through the gallery to see a sampling of the 11 other installations. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureA collection of the ordinary and extraordinary – The museum’s 12 inaugural exhibitions are organized around themes of history, community and culture. One traces the history of the design and building of the museum. Click through the gallery to see a sampling of the 11 other installations. Hide Caption 2 of 20The story begins below ground in the museum's "Slavery and Freedom" exhibit, which starts with the 15th-century transatlantic slave trade and takes visitors through the Civil War and the Emancipation Proclamation. These are pre-1860s shackles.The story begins below ground in the museum's "Slavery and Freedom" exhibit, which starts with the 15th-century transatlantic slave trade and takes visitors through the Civil War and the Emancipation Proclamation. These are pre-1860s shackles. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureSlavery and Freedom – The story begins below ground in the museum’s “Slavery and Freedom” exhibit, which starts with the 15th-century transatlantic slave trade and takes visitors through the Civil War and the Emancipation Proclamation. These are pre-1860s shackles.Hide Caption 3 of 20This advertisement card promoted a slave sale in Memphis, Tennessee, circa 1859-1860.This advertisement card promoted a slave sale in Memphis, Tennessee, circa 1859-1860. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureSlavery and Freedom – This advertisement card promoted a slave sale in Memphis, Tennessee, circa 1859-1860.Hide Caption 4 of 20African-American farmer Joshua Lyles moved from Tennessee to Indiana in the 1840s and founded a small town, Lyles Station, Indiana, where free African-American farmers could live and farm. Lyles used this walking plow, which was donated to the museum by Lyles Station Historic Preservation Corporation. A few descendants of the town's original occupants still farm the land there. African-American farmer Joshua Lyles moved from Tennessee to Indiana in the 1840s and founded a small town, Lyles Station, Indiana, where free African-American farmers could live and farm. Lyles used this walking plow, which was donated to the museum by Lyles Station Historic Preservation Corporation. A few descendants of the town's original occupants still farm the land there. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CulturePower of Place – African-American farmer Joshua Lyles moved from Tennessee to Indiana in the 1840s and founded a small town, Lyles Station, Indiana, where free African-American farmers could live and farm. Lyles used this walking plow, which was donated to the museum by Lyles Station Historic Preservation Corporation. A few descendants of the town’s original occupants still farm the land there. Hide Caption 5 of 20Lawrence McVey, shown in uniform in this photographic postcard around 1914-18, was part of the 369th United States Infantry, nicknamed the "Harlem Hellfighters." They were the first African-American regiment of troops to reach the battlefields of World War I, but they were assigned to the French Army because of racial tensions among US troops. McVery was awarded the Croix de Guerre by the French government for his bravery in combat. Lawrence McVey, shown in uniform in this photographic postcard around 1914-18, was part of the 369th United States Infantry, nicknamed the "Harlem Hellfighters." They were the first African-American regiment of troops to reach the battlefields of World War I, but they were assigned to the French Army because of racial tensions among US troops. McVery was awarded the Croix de Guerre by the French government for his bravery in combat. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureDouble Victory: The African American Military Experience – Lawrence McVey, shown in uniform in this photographic postcard around 1914-18, was part of the 369th United States Infantry, nicknamed the “Harlem Hellfighters.” They were the first African-American regiment of troops to reach the battlefields of World War I, but they were assigned to the French Army because of racial tensions among US troops. McVery was awarded the Croix de Guerre by the French government for his bravery in combat. Hide Caption 6 of 20This vintage open-cockpit biplane, used at Alabama's renowned Tuskegee Institute to train African-American pilots for Army Air Corps service during World War II, is on display.This vintage open-cockpit biplane, used at Alabama's renowned Tuskegee Institute to train African-American pilots for Army Air Corps service during World War II, is on display. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureDefending Freedom, Defining Freedom: Era of Segregation – This vintage open-cockpit biplane, used at Alabama’s renowned Tuskegee Institute to train African-American pilots for Army Air Corps service during World War II, is on display.Hide Caption 7 of 20Photographer James H. Wallace took this picture of a July 4, 1964, march in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. It was donated to the museum by his son, James H. Wallace, Jr. Photographer James H. Wallace took this picture of a July 4, 1964, march in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. It was donated to the museum by his son, James H. Wallace, Jr. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureMaking A Way Out of No Way – Photographer James H. Wallace took this picture of a July 4, 1964, march in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. It was donated to the museum by his son, James H. Wallace, Jr. Hide Caption 8 of 20Noted author and playwright James Baldwin's U.S. passport, dated August 2, 1965, was donated to the museum by his family. It's one of many of Baldwin's (1924-1987) personal effects given by his family to the museum. Noted author and playwright James Baldwin's U.S. passport, dated August 2, 1965, was donated to the museum by his family. It's one of many of Baldwin's (1924-1987) personal effects given by his family to the museum. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureMaking a Way Out of No Way – Noted author and playwright James Baldwin’s U.S. passport, dated August 2, 1965, was donated to the museum by his family. It’s one of many of Baldwin’s (1924-1987) personal effects given by his family to the museum. Hide Caption 9 of 20Singer Marian Anderson made history when she sang at the Lincoln Memorial, where first lady Eleanor Roosevelt invited her to perform after the Daughters of the Revolution would not let her sing at Constitution Hall. The skirt and decorative trim are original to the 1939 outfit. The rest was added in 1993. Singer Marian Anderson made history when she sang at the Lincoln Memorial, where first lady Eleanor Roosevelt invited her to perform after the Daughters of the Revolution would not let her sing at Constitution Hall. The skirt and decorative trim are original to the 1939 outfit. The rest was added in 1993. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureMusical Crossroads – Singer Marian Anderson made history when she sang at the Lincoln Memorial, where first lady Eleanor Roosevelt invited her to perform after the Daughters of the Revolution would not let her sing at Constitution Hall. The skirt and decorative trim are original to the 1939 outfit. The rest was added in 1993. Hide Caption 10 of 20Internationally renowned musician Louis Armstrong owned this 1946 Henri Selmer B-flat trumpet, which was custom-made and inscribed for him by the Selmer Company. Internationally renowned musician Louis Armstrong owned this 1946 Henri Selmer B-flat trumpet, which was custom-made and inscribed for him by the Selmer Company. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureMusical Crossroads – Internationally renowned musician Louis Armstrong owned this 1946 Henri Selmer B-flat trumpet, which was custom-made and inscribed for him by the Selmer Company. Hide Caption 11 of 20Tennis great Althea Gibson was the first African-American woman to win a Wimbledon tennis championship. The museum has many Gibson items, including this U.S. Tennis Association wool blazer from the 1957 Wightman Cup, which Gibson won.Tennis great Althea Gibson was the first African-American woman to win a Wimbledon tennis championship. The museum has many Gibson items, including this U.S. Tennis Association wool blazer from the 1957 Wightman Cup, which Gibson won. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureSports: Leveling the Playing Field – Tennis great Althea Gibson was the first African-American woman to win a Wimbledon tennis championship. The museum has many Gibson items, including this U.S. Tennis Association wool blazer from the 1957 Wightman Cup, which Gibson won.Hide Caption 12 of 20A 16-page program for the April 9, 1968, funeral service for Martin Luther King, Jr., at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta was stored in a cloth clamshell box with a leather label.A 16-page program for the April 9, 1968, funeral service for Martin Luther King, Jr., at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta was stored in a cloth clamshell box with a leather label. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureA Changing America: 1968 and Beyond – A 16-page program for the April 9, 1968, funeral service for Martin Luther King, Jr., at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta was stored in a cloth clamshell box with a leather label.Hide Caption 13 of 20American soldiers fighting in Vietnam would often buy Vietnam tour jackets, and black soldiers' jackets often had an embroidered message about black unity and black power.American soldiers fighting in Vietnam would often buy Vietnam tour jackets, and black soldiers' jackets often had an embroidered message about black unity and black power. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureA Changing America: 1968 and Beyond – American soldiers fighting in Vietnam would often buy Vietnam tour jackets, and black soldiers’ jackets often had an embroidered message about black unity and black power.Hide Caption 14 of 20These handcuffs were used <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/07/21/massachusetts.harvard.professor.arrested/">in the 2009 arrest </a>of Harvard University professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr., in front of his home in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Gates donated the handcuffs to the museum. These handcuffs were used <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/07/21/massachusetts.harvard.professor.arrested/">in the 2009 arrest </a>of Harvard University professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr., in front of his home in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Gates donated the handcuffs to the museum. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureA Changing America: 1968 and Beyond – These handcuffs were used in the 2009 arrest of Harvard University professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr., in front of his home in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Gates donated the handcuffs to the museum. Hide Caption 15 of 20This costume for the Tin Man in the Broadway production of "The Wiz," an African-American take on "The Wizard of Oz," is from 1975. This costume for the Tin Man in the Broadway production of "The Wiz," an African-American take on "The Wizard of Oz," is from 1975. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureTaking the Stage – This costume for the Tin Man in the Broadway production of “The Wiz,” an African-American take on “The Wizard of Oz,” is from 1975. Hide Caption 16 of 20Actor Sherman Hemsley and actress Isabel Sanford wore these clothes when they played married couple George and Louise Jefferson on the breakthrough television series "The Jeffersons," which ran from 1975-85. Actor Sherman Hemsley and actress Isabel Sanford wore these clothes when they played married couple George and Louise Jefferson on the breakthrough television series "The Jeffersons," which ran from 1975-85. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureTaking the Stage – Actor Sherman Hemsley and actress Isabel Sanford wore these clothes when they played married couple George and Louise Jefferson on the breakthrough television series “The Jeffersons,” which ran from 1975-85. Hide Caption 17 of 20Charles W. Chesnutt 's "Conjure Woman" was first published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in 1899 and is considered an iconic work of African-American literature of the time. Charles W. Chesnutt 's "Conjure Woman" was first published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in 1899 and is considered an iconic work of African-American literature of the time. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureCultural Expressions – Charles W. Chesnutt ‘s “Conjure Woman” was first published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in 1899 and is considered an iconic work of African-American literature of the time. Hide Caption 18 of 20Basketball star Michael Jordan made his Nike Air Jordan shoes a hot commodity. This pair of size 13 red and black Air Jordan I high top sneakers is from 1985, a year after he starting playing for the Chicago Bulls. Basketball star Michael Jordan made his Nike Air Jordan shoes a hot commodity. This pair of size 13 red and black Air Jordan I high top sneakers is from 1985, a year after he starting playing for the Chicago Bulls. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureCultural Expressions – Basketball star Michael Jordan made his Nike Air Jordan shoes a hot commodity. This pair of size 13 red and black Air Jordan I high top sneakers is from 1985, a year after he starting playing for the Chicago Bulls. Hide Caption 19 of 20In "Grand Dame Queenie,"  her 2012 oil painting, contemporary artist <a href="http://www.amysherald.com/" target="_blank">Amy Sherald</a> explored themes of race, gender and identity. Born in Columbus, Georgia, and now living in Baltimore, Sherald's work is also in National Museum of Women in the Arts.In "Grand Dame Queenie,"  her 2012 oil painting, contemporary artist <a href="http://www.amysherald.com/" target="_blank">Amy Sherald</a> explored themes of race, gender and identity. Born in Columbus, Georgia, and now living in Baltimore, Sherald's work is also in National Museum of Women in the Arts. Photos: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and CultureVisual Arts and the American Experience – In “Grand Dame Queenie,” her 2012 oil painting, contemporary artist Amy Sherald explored themes of race, gender and identity. Born in Columbus, Georgia, and now living in Baltimore, Sherald’s work is also in National Museum of Women in the Arts.Hide Caption 20 of 2001 smithsonian african american 2016AK11_22102 smithsonian african american 2016AK11_21203 smithsonian african american 2008_10_4_00104 smithsonian african american 2014_63_17_00120 smithsonian african american 2012_155_11_1-_2_00112 smithsonian african american 2011_108_17tuskegee airman07 smithsonian african american 2011_11_608 smithsonian african american 2011_99_2_1_00319 smithsonian african american 2014_27_2_1-2_00113 smithsonian african american 2008_16_1-3_001althea gibson blazer18 smithsonian african american 2012_39_00110 smithsonian african american 2012_136_00209 smithsonian african american 2010_11_00115 smithsonian african american 2007_3_7_00114 smithsonian african american 2013_145_1-2_00121 smithsonian african american 2014_28022 smithsonian african american 2014_221_1ab_00316 smithsonian african american 2013_20_001Lewis first won election to Congress in 1986. One of his earliest bills called for the establishment of a national museum to display the history of Black America. The legislation repeatedly stalled. So, Lewis resubmitted the bill for discussion every year for 15 consecutive years before Congress passed it in 2003. The bill was signed into law by President George W. Bush, establishing the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. The museum opened in 2016. National Park Conservation AssociationThe National Park Service manages several locations where significant events occurred during the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 60s. Congressman Lewis received two of the National Park Conservation Association’s most prestigious awards: the NPCA Honor Award (1996), which recognizes outstanding efforts by a citizen activist, politician, or community on behalf of the National Park System, and the William Penn Mott Park Leadership Award (2001), which recognizes the efforts of legislators and other public officials who advocate for the parks. A donation to the NPCA safeguards the scenic beauty, wildlife, and historical and cultural treasures of the world’s largest and most diverse park system. Hosea Feed the Hungry and Homeless, Inc.March 1965:  American civil rights campaigner Martin Luther King (1929  - 1968) and his wife Coretta Scott King lead a black voting rights march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery;  among those pictured are, front row, politician and civil rights activist John Lewis (1940 -- 2020), Reverend Ralph Abernathy (1926 - 1990), Ruth Harris Bunche (1906 - 1988), Nobel Prize-winning political scientist and diplomat Ralph Bunche (1904 - 1971), activist Hosea Williams  (1926 -- 2000). (Photo by William Lovelace/Express/Getty Images)March 1965:  American civil rights campaigner Martin Luther King (1929  - 1968) and his wife Coretta Scott King lead a black voting rights march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery;  among those pictured are, front row, politician and civil rights activist John Lewis (1940 -- 2020), Reverend Ralph Abernathy (1926 - 1990), Ruth Harris Bunche (1906 - 1988), Nobel Prize-winning political scientist and diplomat Ralph Bunche (1904 - 1971), activist Hosea Williams  (1926 -- 2000). (Photo by William Lovelace/Express/Getty Images)March 1965: American civil rights campaigner Martin Luther King (1929 – 1968) and his wife Coretta Scott King lead a black voting rights march from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery; among those pictured are, front row, politician and civil rights activist John Lewis (1940 — 2020), Reverend Ralph Abernathy (1926 – 1990), Ruth Harris Bunche (1906 – 1988), Nobel Prize-winning political scientist and diplomat Ralph Bunche (1904 – 1971), activist Hosea Williams (1926 — 2000). (Photo by William Lovelace/Express/Getty Images)On March 7, 1965, also known as “Bloody Sunday,” Lewis and fellow activist Hosea Williams marched side by side, leading over 600 marchers across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. In 1971, Williams founded Hosea Feed the Hungry and Homeless, which provides hot meals, haircuts, clothing, and other services for the needy in Atlanta, which happens to be the congressman’s home district. Lewis would frequently help distribute meals on Thanksgiving and Christmas.Free Minds Book Club & Writing WorkshopThe Washington, DC, non-profit Free Minds Book Club & Writing Workshop helps current and formerly incarcerated people develop literacy skills through book clubs and writing workshops. The non-profit also offers workforce development and violence prevention programs. Lewis visited members of the program in a DC jail in 2016. The non-profit created the Congressman John Lewis Fellowship, which pays former inmates to promote nonviolence and racial equity through storytelling and poetry.

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