Story highlightsOne year after the inauguration of Donald Trump, many have returned to the Women’s March, signs in hand.

(CNN)The day after the inauguration of Donald Trump, people across the world took to the streets in protest. One year later, many have returned to the Women’s March, signs in hand.

A sign holds more than just a slogan representing the crowd’s wider message. It holds significance for the person who spent time making it and carrying it all the way to the event. It’s a way for the person’s voice to be heard without them uttering a word, a way to inspire the crowd around them and make their point to the world.At this year’s Women’s Marches, from Rome to New York and Los Angeles, handmade signs were just as ubiquitous as the knit hats in every shade of pink.The world heard what people had to say Saturday in part because of those signs, held high and waved proudly for everyone to see.A woman holds a sign that says "mujer" -- the Spanish word for "woman" -- during a demonstration in New York.A woman holds a sign that says "mujer" -- the Spanish word for "woman" -- during a demonstration in New York.A woman holds a sign that says “mujer” — the Spanish word for “woman” — during a demonstration in New York.People take part in the Women's March in Chicago.People take part in the Women's March in Chicago.People take part in the Women’s March in Chicago.A woman attends the demonstration in Washington.A woman attends the demonstration in Washington.A woman attends the demonstration in Washington.People rally in downtown Chicago.People rally in downtown Chicago.People rally in downtown Chicago.A demonstrator holds a sign that reads "Here's to Strong Women" during the Women's March in Washington.A demonstrator holds a sign that reads "Here's to Strong Women" during the Women's March in Washington.A demonstrator holds a sign that reads “Here’s to Strong Women” during the Women’s March in Washington.A woman holds a sign in front of the White House in Washington.A woman holds a sign in front of the White House in Washington.A woman holds a sign in front of the White House in Washington.J.T. Elliot watches as people march down Market Street during the Women's March in St Louis.J.T. Elliot watches as people march down Market Street during the Women's March in St Louis.J.T. Elliot watches as people march down Market Street during the Women’s March in St Louis.A woman holds a sign that reads "Nasty Woman" -- a reference to what Donald Trump said about his opponent, Hillary Clinton, during a presidential debate -- during a demonstration in Chicago.A woman holds a sign that reads "Nasty Woman" -- a reference to what Donald Trump said about his opponent, Hillary Clinton, during a presidential debate -- during a demonstration in Chicago.A woman holds a sign that reads “Nasty Woman” — a reference to what Donald Trump said about his opponent, Hillary Clinton, during a presidential debate — during a demonstration in Chicago.A woman attends the march in New York.A woman attends the march in New York.A woman attends the march in New York.A woman in Rome holds a sign reading "Migrant Lives Matter."A woman in Rome holds a sign reading "Migrant Lives Matter."A woman in Rome holds a sign reading “Migrant Lives Matter.”A woman holds a sign reading "Women united! Will never be defeated!" during a demonstration in downtown Rome.A woman holds a sign reading "Women united! Will never be defeated!" during a demonstration in downtown Rome.A woman holds a sign reading “Women united! Will never be defeated!” during a demonstration in downtown Rome.A demonstrator holds a sign at First Ward Park in Charlotte, North Carolina.A demonstrator holds a sign at First Ward Park in Charlotte, North Carolina.A demonstrator holds a sign at First Ward Park in Charlotte, North Carolina."I have had enough," reads a sign in New York."I have had enough," reads a sign in New York.“I have had enough,” reads a sign in New York.

Source Link:
http://www.cnn.com/2018/01/20/world/womens-march-anniversary-signs/index.html

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