(CNN)Hurricanes are the most violent storms on the planet, and strong storms are getting stronger thanks to warmer oceans.

Dorian, the second strongest Atlantic hurricane in modern record, is a prime example of storms reaching the highest category on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale. The strongest hurricane ever to make landfall in the Bahamas lingered over the islands for days, leaving catastrophic damage behind. While the storm was not caused by the climate crisis, we do know that climate change is worsening the impact of storms like Hurricane Dorian, with higher storm surges, increased rainfall and rising storm intensity. Here are some of the ways hurricanes are being impacted by the climate crisis and how Dorian is indicative of each.Sea level rise is making storm surge more dangerous Read MoreStorm surge, not wind or rain, is the number one killer in hurricanes, and climate change is making it worse. Sea level has already risen as a result of climate change, and that rate is accelerating around the world. Current conservative projections for sea level rise by the end of this century (by 2100) are for an additional 12-24 inches, according to the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Storm surge is the rise in ocean levels brought about by the wind and low pressure in a hurricane. When the winds blow onshore, it pushes the water higher, forcing it farther inland than normal tidal levels. Given a relatively flat coastal plain, raising water levels by only inches can make a dramatic difference on how far inland the water can travel. Adding two to three feet of water height would be like increasing a storm’s surge by one category on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale. It essentially makes a Category 1 hurricane, which usually has a storm surge of 4-5 feet, have a storm surge into the 6-10 foot range — what you would typically see from a Category 2 hurricane.Residents of Tacloban in the Philippines, where Super Typhoon Haiyan roared ashore in 2013, described the devastating storm surge as “like a tsunami” — an apt comparison for the 5-7 meter (16-23 foot) wall of water that crashed into the city during the storm.WHAT THIS MEANS FOR DORIAN: Dorian’s storm surge washed across the many islands in the Northern Bahamas, leaving devastation that is only starting to come into view now that the storm is slowly moving away. While Dorian’s extreme winds built the surge to exceptional levels, higher base sea levels from climate change adding another foot or so no doubt made a big difference on the largely pancake-flat terrain of the Bahamas.Wetter stormsWhile storm surge causes about half of the fatalities in landfalling hurricanes, the second deadliest aspect of the storm comes from flooding rainfall, which accounts for more than a quarter of all storm-related deaths.Scientists are very confident that climate change is making storm rainfall worse, by increasing the rate at which it falls as well as the amount of rain a storm can produce.That is because the physics behind this increase is very well understood, through a relationship called the “Clausius-Clapeyron Equation.””Simply put, warmer air holds more water vapor,” according to Jim Kossin, an Atmospheric Research Scientist at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information. Other cities have built levees and sea walls. That won't work in FloridaOther cities have built levees and sea walls. That won't work in FloridaOther cities have built levees and sea walls. That won't work in FloridaThe equation pegs that increase at around 7% more water vapor available in the atmosphere per degree Celsius of warming (nearly 4% per degree Fahrenheit).That would mean that in a world warmed by two degrees Celsius, you would have, on average, around 14% more water vapor in the atmosphere that is available to be dumped as rain. Computer modeling shows this increase consistently, but according to Kossin, there hasn’t been a clearly increasing trend in the observed data.”Precipitation data is pretty messy stuff,” he said, explaining that observing stations are few and far between and the satellite data doesn’t go back long enough to draw firm conclusions.There have been several recent storms that provide anecdotal evidence. Hurricanes Harvey and Florence both set tropical rainfall records in the United States.WHAT THIS MEANS FOR DORIAN: We don’t know how much rain fell from Dorian quite yet, but totals are sure to be extreme given the slow movement of the storm. Estimates are up to 30 inches or more across Grand Bahama and Great Abaco Island.Stronger storms are getting strongerHurricanes are essentially massive heat engines that are fueled by warm ocean water and air.This energy is converted into lashing winds and driving rainfall that brings a myriad of devastating impacts when they hit land.Humans are warming the air and oceans where hurricanes are spawned, of this scientists are quite certain.But how this changes hurricanes is an open question with a growing amount of hypotheses. The connection between human-induced warming of the planet and changes in hurricane frequency, intensity or impacts is more challenging to understand, because the historical data-set that scientists have to work with is much shorter and less robust than something like the temperature record.Whereas the global temperature record goes back more than 150 years, records for hurricanes get very sparse prior to the 1970s, when satellites first began beaming back images covering all the world’s oceans. Kossin says the added heat in the oceans is “increasing the speed-limit for storms,” allowing them to reach higher intensities. “The stronger storms are getting stronger,” he warned, “and the stronger storms are becoming more frequent.” “The prevailing consensus is that we likely won’t see more storms in the future (maybe even fewer), but that these storms may be stronger,” according to Phil Klotzbach, a hurricane researcher at Colorado State University.WHAT THIS MEANS FOR DORIAN: Dorian was a Category 5 hurricane (meaning winds greater than 157 mph), and even though there is no Category 6, if you extrapolated the scale out, Dorian’s 185 mph sustained winds would make it one. Dorian is the latest in a series of storms in recent years to impact the Atlantic as a Category 4 or 5 after Harvey, Irma, Maria and Michael.More storms appear to be rapidly intensifyingThe warmer oceans extend beyond just the surface, going hundreds of meters deep, allowing plenty of ocean heat content for hurricanes to use for fuel.”If you increase the speed limit, you make more room for the storms to strengthen, so it can intensify more quickly,” Kossin said.This has led scientists to believe that storms are more likely to undergo “rapid-intensification” as a result of climate change warming the oceans.In photos: Hurricane DorianIn photos: Hurricane Dorian Photos: Hurricane DorianA family is escorted to a safe zone after being rescued, as Hurricane Dorian continues to dump rain in Freeport, Bahamas, on Tuesday, September 3. A family is escorted to a safe zone after being rescued, as Hurricane Dorian continues to dump rain in Freeport, Bahamas, on Tuesday, September 3. Photos: Hurricane DorianA family is escorted to a safe zone after being rescued, as Hurricane Dorian continues to dump rain in Freeport, Bahamas, on Tuesday, September 3. Hide Caption 1 of 51This aerial image shows the damage to Great Abaco Island in the Bahamas on September 3. This aerial image shows the damage to Great Abaco Island in the Bahamas on September 3. Photos: Hurricane DorianThis aerial image shows the damage to Great Abaco Island in the Bahamas on September 3. Hide Caption 2 of 51Volunteers walk down a flooded road as they work to rescue families near the Casuarina Bridge in Freeport, Grand Bahama, on September 3. Volunteers walk down a flooded road as they work to rescue families near the Casuarina Bridge in Freeport, Grand Bahama, on September 3. Photos: Hurricane DorianVolunteers walk down a flooded road as they work to rescue families near the Casuarina Bridge in Freeport, Grand Bahama, on September 3. Hide Caption 3 of 51A car is submerged in floodwaters in Freeport, Bahamas, on September 3. A car is submerged in floodwaters in Freeport, Bahamas, on September 3. Photos: Hurricane DorianA car is submerged in floodwaters in Freeport, Bahamas, on September 3. Hide Caption 4 of 51Julia Aylen carries her dog as she wades through waist-deep water near her home in Freeport on September 3.Julia Aylen carries her dog as she wades through waist-deep water near her home in Freeport on September 3. Photos: Hurricane DorianJulia Aylen carries her dog as she wades through waist-deep water near her home in Freeport on September 3.Hide Caption 5 of 51Residents wade through a flooded street in Freeport on September 3.Residents wade through a flooded street in Freeport on September 3. Photos: Hurricane DorianResidents wade through a flooded street in Freeport on September 3.Hide Caption 6 of 51Eddie Wright and his dog, Vino, wait on a bus to evacuate Brunswick, Georgia.Eddie Wright and his dog, Vino, wait on a bus to evacuate Brunswick, Georgia. Photos: Hurricane DorianEddie Wright and his dog, Vino, wait on a bus to evacuate Brunswick, Georgia.Hide Caption 7 of 51A house is flooded in Freeport on September 3.A house is flooded in Freeport on September 3. Photos: Hurricane DorianA house is flooded in Freeport on September 3.Hide Caption 8 of 51People gather donations at the Christ Episcopal Church in Miami.People gather donations at the Christ Episcopal Church in Miami. Photos: Hurricane DorianPeople gather donations at the Christ Episcopal Church in Miami.Hide Caption 9 of 51Boats are piled up at a Bahamian port on Monday, September 2.Boats are piled up at a Bahamian port on Monday, September 2. Photos: Hurricane DorianBoats are piled up at a Bahamian port on Monday, September 2.Hide Caption 10 of 51This September 2 photo provided by NASA shows the eye of Hurricane Dorian shown from the International Space Station. This September 2 photo provided by NASA shows the eye of Hurricane Dorian shown from the International Space Station. Photos: Hurricane DorianThis September 2 photo provided by NASA shows the eye of Hurricane Dorian shown from the International Space Station. Hide Caption 11 of 51Evacuation traffic is seen near South Carolina's coast on September 2.Evacuation traffic is seen near South Carolina's coast on September 2. Photos: Hurricane DorianEvacuation traffic is seen near South Carolina’s coast on September 2.Hide Caption 12 of 51US Coast Guard helicopter crews are helping with search-and-rescue efforts in the Bahamas.US Coast Guard helicopter crews are helping with search-and-rescue efforts in the Bahamas. Photos: Hurricane DorianUS Coast Guard helicopter crews are helping with search-and-rescue efforts in the Bahamas.Hide Caption 13 of 51A man crosses the street during a downpour in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on September 2. The hurricane's outer bands had already started hitting the state.A man crosses the street during a downpour in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on September 2. The hurricane's outer bands had already started hitting the state. Photos: Hurricane DorianA man crosses the street during a downpour in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on September 2. The hurricane’s outer bands had already started hitting the state.Hide Caption 14 of 51This aerial photo shows Marsh Harbour, Bahamas, on September 2.This aerial photo shows Marsh Harbour, Bahamas, on September 2. Photos: Hurricane DorianThis aerial photo shows Marsh Harbour, Bahamas, on September 2.Hide Caption 15 of 51Agency officials brief Bahamian Prime Minister Hubert Minnis and his cabinet members on September 2. Minnis said many homes, businesses and other buildings have been destroyed or heavily damaged. He called the devastation "unprecedented and extensive."Agency officials brief Bahamian Prime Minister Hubert Minnis and his cabinet members on September 2. Minnis said many homes, businesses and other buildings have been destroyed or heavily damaged. He called the devastation "unprecedented and extensive." Photos: Hurricane DorianAgency officials brief Bahamian Prime Minister Hubert Minnis and his cabinet members on September 2. Minnis said many homes, businesses and other buildings have been destroyed or heavily damaged. He called the devastation “unprecedented and extensive.”Hide Caption 16 of 51Businesses are seen shuttered near Jetty Park in Fort Pierce, Florida, on September 2.Businesses are seen shuttered near Jetty Park in Fort Pierce, Florida, on September 2. Photos: Hurricane DorianBusinesses are seen shuttered near Jetty Park in Fort Pierce, Florida, on September 2.Hide Caption 17 of 51A boy stands near high surf in Vero Beach, Florida, on September 2.A boy stands near high surf in Vero Beach, Florida, on September 2. Photos: Hurricane DorianA boy stands near high surf in Vero Beach, Florida, on September 2.Hide Caption 18 of 51This view of the storm was taken from the International Space Station on September 2.This view of the storm was taken from the International Space Station on September 2. Photos: Hurricane DorianThis view of the storm was taken from the International Space Station on September 2.Hide Caption 19 of 51Dorian left heavy damage at this resort in Hope Town, Bahamas.Dorian left heavy damage at this resort in Hope Town, Bahamas. Photos: Hurricane DorianDorian left heavy damage at this resort in Hope Town, Bahamas.Hide Caption 20 of 51Waves caused by Dorian crash into a man at the Jupiter Beach Park in Florida on September 2.Waves caused by Dorian crash into a man at the Jupiter Beach Park in Florida on September 2. Photos: Hurricane DorianWaves caused by Dorian crash into a man at the Jupiter Beach Park in Florida on September 2.Hide Caption 21 of 51Strong winds blow the tops of trees and brush in Freeport, Bahamas, on September 2.Strong winds blow the tops of trees and brush in Freeport, Bahamas, on September 2. Photos: Hurricane DorianStrong winds blow the tops of trees and brush in Freeport, Bahamas, on September 2.Hide Caption 22 of 51A passenger looks at the flight board at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport on September 2. The airport canceled flights and closed because of winds caused by Dorian.A passenger looks at the flight board at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport on September 2. The airport canceled flights and closed because of winds caused by Dorian. Photos: Hurricane DorianA passenger looks at the flight board at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport on September 2. The airport canceled flights and closed because of winds caused by Dorian.Hide Caption 23 of 51People watch the waves crash onto Vero Beach on September 2.People watch the waves crash onto Vero Beach on September 2. Photos: Hurricane DorianPeople watch the waves crash onto Vero Beach on September 2.Hide Caption 24 of 51Clouds loom over a lifeguard tower in Fort Lauderdale on September 2. Clouds loom over a lifeguard tower in Fort Lauderdale on September 2. Photos: Hurricane DorianClouds loom over a lifeguard tower in Fort Lauderdale on September 2. Hide Caption 25 of 51Beachgoers watch a man ride a kiteboard in Indialantic, Florida, on Sunday, September 1.Beachgoers watch a man ride a kiteboard in Indialantic, Florida, on Sunday, September 1. Photos: Hurricane DorianBeachgoers watch a man ride a kiteboard in Indialantic, Florida, on Sunday, September 1.Hide Caption 26 of 51Palm trees blow in strong winds prior to Dorian's landfall in Freeport.Palm trees blow in strong winds prior to Dorian's landfall in Freeport. Photos: Hurricane DorianPalm trees blow in strong winds prior to Dorian’s landfall in Freeport.Hide Caption 27 of 51A view outside a car's windshield before Dorian hit Freeport on September 1.A view outside a car's windshield before Dorian hit Freeport on September 1. Photos: Hurricane DorianA view outside a car’s windshield before Dorian hit Freeport on September 1.Hide Caption 28 of 51Riverside Mobile Home Park residents Joe Lewis, left, and Rob Chambers work to secure an air conditioner before evacuating the park in Jensen Beach, Florida.Riverside Mobile Home Park residents Joe Lewis, left, and Rob Chambers work to secure an air conditioner before evacuating the park in Jensen Beach, Florida. Photos: Hurricane DorianRiverside Mobile Home Park residents Joe Lewis, left, and Rob Chambers work to secure an air conditioner before evacuating the park in Jensen Beach, Florida.Hide Caption 29 of 51A man places a shutter in a window in Lake Worth, Florida.A man places a shutter in a window in Lake Worth, Florida. Photos: Hurricane DorianA man places a shutter in a window in Lake Worth, Florida.Hide Caption 30 of 51Passengers arrive at Orlando International Airport on Saturday, August 31.Passengers arrive at Orlando International Airport on Saturday, August 31. Photos: Hurricane DorianPassengers arrive at Orlando International Airport on Saturday, August 31.Hide Caption 31 of 51Workers install storm shutters in Marsh Harbour, Bahamas.Workers install storm shutters in Marsh Harbour, Bahamas. Photos: Hurricane DorianWorkers install storm shutters in Marsh Harbour, Bahamas.Hide Caption 32 of 51NASA employees watch as the Artemis launch tower is rolled back inside of a building at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.NASA employees watch as the Artemis launch tower is rolled back inside of a building at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photos: Hurricane DorianNASA employees watch as the Artemis launch tower is rolled back inside of a building at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.Hide Caption 33 of 51Matt Rohrer loads sandbags in the back of his vehicle in Flagler Beach, Florida, on Friday, August 30.Matt Rohrer loads sandbags in the back of his vehicle in Flagler Beach, Florida, on Friday, August 30. Photos: Hurricane DorianMatt Rohrer loads sandbags in the back of his vehicle in Flagler Beach, Florida, on Friday, August 30.Hide Caption 34 of 51Workers at Flamingo Gardens in Davie, Florida, move an Allosaurus statue on August 30.Workers at Flamingo Gardens in Davie, Florida, move an Allosaurus statue on August 30. Photos: Hurricane DorianWorkers at Flamingo Gardens in Davie, Florida, move an Allosaurus statue on August 30.Hide Caption 35 of 51Shoppers wait in line before sunrise for a Sam's Club store to open in Kissimmee, Florida.Shoppers wait in line before sunrise for a Sam's Club store to open in Kissimmee, Florida. Photos: Hurricane DorianShoppers wait in line before sunrise for a Sam’s Club store to open in Kissimmee, Florida.Hide Caption 36 of 51A supervised work crew of female jail prisoners fills sandbags in Titusville, Florida, on Thursday, August 29.A supervised work crew of female jail prisoners fills sandbags in Titusville, Florida, on Thursday, August 29. Photos: Hurricane DorianA supervised work crew of female jail prisoners fills sandbags in Titusville, Florida, on Thursday, August 29.Hide Caption 37 of 51"Here's a look at #HurricaneDorian from @Space_Station," said astronaut Andrew Morgan, who <a href="https://twitter.com/AstroDrewMorgan/status/1167447150478934016" target="_blank">posted this photo to Twitter.</a> "I caught this shot (August 29) as it traveled across the Caribbean north of Haiti and the Dominican Republic.""Here's a look at #HurricaneDorian from @Space_Station," said astronaut Andrew Morgan, who <a href="https://twitter.com/AstroDrewMorgan/status/1167447150478934016" target="_blank">posted this photo to Twitter.</a> "I caught this shot (August 29) as it traveled across the Caribbean north of Haiti and the Dominican Republic." Photos: Hurricane Dorian”Here’s a look at #HurricaneDorian from @Space_Station,” said astronaut Andrew Morgan, who posted this photo to Twitter. “I caught this shot (August 29) as it traveled across the Caribbean north of Haiti and the Dominican Republic.”Hide Caption 38 of 51Shoppers wait in long lines at a Costco in Davie, Florida, on August 29.Shoppers wait in long lines at a Costco in Davie, Florida, on August 29. Photos: Hurricane DorianShoppers wait in long lines at a Costco in Davie, Florida, on August 29.Hide Caption 39 of 51A man fills containers with gasoline in Hialeah, Florida, on August 29.A man fills containers with gasoline in Hialeah, Florida, on August 29. Photos: Hurricane DorianA man fills containers with gasoline in Hialeah, Florida, on August 29.Hide Caption 40 of 51A man rides a bike by a Miami Beach building with boarded-up windows on August 29.A man rides a bike by a Miami Beach building with boarded-up windows on August 29. Photos: Hurricane DorianA man rides a bike by a Miami Beach building with boarded-up windows on August 29.Hide Caption 41 of 51Dozens of Orange County residents fill sandbags at Blanchard Park in Orlando on Wednesday, August 28.Dozens of Orange County residents fill sandbags at Blanchard Park in Orlando on Wednesday, August 28. Photos: Hurricane DorianDozens of Orange County residents fill sandbags at Blanchard Park in Orlando on Wednesday, August 28.Hide Caption 42 of 51Empty shelves are seen at a supermarket in Patillas, Puerto Rico, on August 28.Empty shelves are seen at a supermarket in Patillas, Puerto Rico, on August 28. Photos: Hurricane DorianEmpty shelves are seen at a supermarket in Patillas, Puerto Rico, on August 28.Hide Caption 43 of 51People stock up with groceries and water in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on August 28.People stock up with groceries and water in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on August 28. Photos: Hurricane DorianPeople stock up with groceries and water in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on August 28.Hide Caption 44 of 51Ya Mary Morales and Henry Sustache put plywood over the windows of their home in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, on August 28. Puerto Rico was ultimately spared the brunt of hurricane-force winds.Ya Mary Morales and Henry Sustache put plywood over the windows of their home in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, on August 28. Puerto Rico was ultimately spared the brunt of hurricane-force winds. Photos: Hurricane DorianYa Mary Morales and Henry Sustache put plywood over the windows of their home in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, on August 28. Puerto Rico was ultimately spared the brunt of hurricane-force winds.Hide Caption 45 of 51Workers prepare a store's exterior in Humacao, Puerto Rico, on August 28.Workers prepare a store's exterior in Humacao, Puerto Rico, on August 28. Photos: Hurricane DorianWorkers prepare a store’s exterior in Humacao, Puerto Rico, on August 28.Hide Caption 46 of 51Cars line up for fuel at a gas station in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, on Tuesday, August 27.Cars line up for fuel at a gas station in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, on Tuesday, August 27. Photos: Hurricane DorianCars line up for fuel at a gas station in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, on Tuesday, August 27.Hide Caption 47 of 51Men board up a shop's windows in Boqueron, Puerto Rico, on August 27.Men board up a shop's windows in Boqueron, Puerto Rico, on August 27. Photos: Hurricane DorianMen board up a shop’s windows in Boqueron, Puerto Rico, on August 27.Hide Caption 48 of 51Municipal employees clear debris in Ponce, Puerto Rico, on August 27.Municipal employees clear debris in Ponce, Puerto Rico, on August 27. Photos: Hurricane DorianMunicipal employees clear debris in Ponce, Puerto Rico, on August 27.Hide Caption 49 of 51Residents board up a storefront pharmacy in Bridgetown, Barbados, on Monday, August 26.Residents board up a storefront pharmacy in Bridgetown, Barbados, on Monday, August 26. Photos: Hurricane DorianResidents board up a storefront pharmacy in Bridgetown, Barbados, on Monday, August 26.Hide Caption 50 of 51Residents stand in line at a grocery store in Bridgetown on August 26.Residents stand in line at a grocery store in Bridgetown on August 26. Photos: Hurricane DorianResidents stand in line at a grocery store in Bridgetown on August 26.Hide Caption 51 of 5114 hurricane dorian 090317 hurricane dorian 0903 aerial19 hurricane dorian 090304 Hurricane Dorian 090310 Hurricane Dorian 090305 Hurricane Dorian 090306 Hurricane Dorian 090307 Hurricane Dorian 090308 Hurricane Dorian 090317 Hurricane Dorian 090218 hurricane dorian 090316 Hurricane Dorian 0902 RESTRICTED18 Hurricane Dorian 090212 hurricane dorian 090210 hurricane dorian 090208 hurricane dorian 0902 prime minister13 hurricane dorian 090211 hurricane dorian 090201 hurricane dorian 0902 international space station01 Hope Town Dorian damage 0902 SCREENGRAB05 hurricane dorian 0902 RESTRICTED03 hurricane dorian 090207 hurricane dorian 090206 hurricane dorian 0902 RESTRICTED09 hurricane dorian 090204 hurricane dorian 0902 RESTRICTED07 hurricane dorian 090112 hurricane dorian 090105 hurricane dorian 090104 hurricane dorian 0901bpt102 dorian 0831201901 dorian prep 0831 BAHAMAS05 dorian 083003B dorian 083004 dorian 083001 dorian 083003 dorian 082902 dorian 083001 dorian 082902 dorian 082902 hurricane dorian 19082902 dorian FL 082909 ts dorian 082801 dorian FL 082902 ts dorian 082808 ts dorian 082807 ts dorian 082803 ts dorian 082804 ts dorian 082805 ts dorian 082806 ts dorian 0828Rapid-intensification, as the name implies, is when a storm quickly strengthens (officially a storm has undergone rapid-intensification if its wind-speed increases by 35 mph in 24 hours). Some recent research has shown this increase observed in global tropical data, but the confidence in the data is low.”We used to observe storms less frequently and with satellites that had lower resolution, and consequently, we likely couldn’t measure rapid intensification as well as we can now,” Klotzbach told CNN.Klotzbach noted that while the data shows an increase in the number of storms that have rapidly intensified, it also shows an increasing number of storms have rapidly weakened — indicating the increases could just be a function of better observations. WHAT THIS MEANS FOR DORIAN: Hurricane Dorian underwent rapid intensification several times during its life-cycle — including when it became a hurricane as it passed by Puerto Rico and over the Virgin Islands, and again as it became one of the strongest hurricanes on record when it made landfall in the Bahamas.Hurricanes are slowing, which could be a big problem

#Dorian's incredible stall over the island of Grand Bahama appears to set a new record for the slowest moving major hurricane over any 24-hour period since records began in 1851.Most people can easily walk faster than the mere 1.3 mph (2.0 kph) that Dorian has been advancing. pic.twitter.com/S4UtofSqwj

— Robert Rohde (@RARohde) September 3, 2019 Hurricanes and tropical storms are moving slower around the planet, according to a study from Kossin. And the slower a storm moves, the more rain it can drop on a particular area, and the longer severe winds have to weaken infrastructure.The 2018 study in the scientific journal Nature showed a 10% decrease in forward speed globally between 1949 and 2016, though there is some variation among ocean basins.Kossin found a 20% to 30% slowdown over land areas affected by North Atlantic and North Pacific tropical cyclones, respectively.According to the study, which looked at each ocean basin where tropical systems form, a slowdown in the movement of the storms has been observed in every basin except the Northern Indian Ocean.Tropical cyclones have slowed more in the Northern Hemisphere, which is significant because that is where a majority of storms occur each year.What made Dorian stall over the Bahamas?What made Dorian stall over the Bahamas?What made Dorian stall over the Bahamas?The western North Pacific basin, where the strongest systems are referred to as typhoons and super typhoons, sees the most storms annually and has seen the most slowing, at 20%.There is considerable evidence that global summertime circulation patterns in the atmosphere are slowing as a result of global warming. Therefore, it would make sense that if the flow around the hurricanes and typhoons is moving slowly, the storms will also be moving slower, which Kossin believes is what he is observing in the data.But there are probably more variables at play than a warmer climate putting the brakes on tropical cyclones.”It is far from clear that global climate change has anything to do with the changes being identified,” said Kevin Trenberth, a senior climate scientist with the National Center for Atmospheric Research.Several major natural climate variations occur over long periods, such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, which is similar to the El Niño/La Niña oscillation that can significantly alter global weather but operates on much longer time scales (hence “decadal,” whereas El Niño/La Niña alternate from year to year).Trenberth points out that this study did not account for these natural cycles, which he said could be behind much of the observed trend.WHAT THIS MEANS FOR DORIAN: Dorian was one of the slowest, if not the slowest moving major hurricanes we have ever recorded. According to Colorado State University hurricane researcher Philip Klotzbach, Hurricane Dorian traveled the second shortest distance in 24 hours by a major hurricane (Cat 3+) since modern records began in 1950. Dorian’s average speed over the Bahamas on Monday may have set a record for the slowest moving hurricane.

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https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/03/weather/climate-change-effects-on-hurricanes/index.html

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