Four active protesters who spoke to CNN for this story requested anonymity because they feared being targeted for their comments. Calvin asked we only use his first name. “Jim,” “Bobo” and “Leslie” requested pseudonyms.

Hong Kong (CNN)Jim bent over, collapsed and started crying.

The 16-year-old didn’t want to abandon the injured man next to him. He applied gauze to stop the man’s eye from gushing with blood, but he still was having trouble walking. Jim tried to carry him, but only made it a few feet. Clouds of tear gas were closing in. Rubber bullets had been flying overhead. The teenager’s hours of first aid work on the front line had taken their toll. Physically he couldn’t carry the wounded man any more. All he could do was cry. Police clash with protesters during a demonstration outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong on June 12.Police clash with protesters during a demonstration outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong on June 12.Police clash with protesters during a demonstration outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong on June 12.It was June 12. Jim had never previously been to a protest. Hours earlier, when he volunteered to help treat the injured, he had no idea that he’d be in the thick of what turned out to be a dangerous encounter with Hong Kong police.Read MoreTens of thousands of protesters took to the streets that day to oppose a controversial bill that would have legalized extradition from Hong Kong to mainland China. The bill was inspired by the city’s inability to return the suspect of a grisly murder to Taiwan, but many Hong Kong citizens feared it would be abused by Beijing for political persecution.Protesters move barricades to block a street during the June 12 protest.Protesters move barricades to block a street during the June 12 protest.Protesters move barricades to block a street during the June 12 protest.Prior to June 12, Jim said he wasn’t political. He was a high school student who liked to play the violin. The son of two medical professionals, he had aspirations to one day be a doctor. A demonstration, he thought, would be a good opportunity to put some first-aid training to use.The rally was given permission by authorities. But by mid-afternoon a number of protesters decided to storm the entrance of the city’s legislature despite the heavy police presence.Police declared the protest a riot and used tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse the crowd. Jim spent about three hours treating the wounded and said what he saw changed him.He thought the Hong Kong police had used disproportionate and “unreasonable force.”Jim could barely sleep that night and when he did, he had nightmares. He had an exam the next day but said his brain “was totally empty.” He sat down at his desk, rested his head on the table and slept.Protesters run after police fired tear gas outside government headquarters on June 12.Protesters run after police fired tear gas outside government headquarters on June 12.Protesters run after police fired tear gas outside government headquarters on June 12.Thousands of young people like Jim have spent the summer on the front lines of Hong Kong’s longest sustained protests since the city returned to China in 1997. Their movement started in opposition to the bill but quickly snowballed into a grassroots, decentralized crusade for universal suffrage and independent inquiries into alleged police misconduct. They want to be able to able to choose their own leader, who is currently appointed by a Beijing-dominated panel.The scenes have grown increasingly violent throughout the summer. The streets of one of the safest cities in the world now regularly become battlegrounds with police firing rubber bullets and tear gas to disperse illegal demonstrations.Hong Kong protesters' 5 demands

Fully withdraw the extradition billSet up an independent inquiry to probe police brutalityWithdraw the characterization of protests as “riots” Release those arrested at protestsImplement universal suffrage in Hong Kong

Protesters say they have become numb to the chaos. Many have become increasingly prone to violence. Those who spoke to CNN about their experiences did so on the condition of anonymity, fearing that they’d be targeted by police or pro-government mobs.Jim said for him, June 12 was the turning point.He decided it wasn’t enough just to volunteer first aid. It was time to get in on the action, even though he had never been involved in politics or been in a fight. He thought he needed to take a stand against what the police had done.A police water cannon drives toward protesters on August 25.A police water cannon drives toward protesters on August 25.A police water cannon drives toward protesters on August 25.July 1On July 1, at 3 a.m. Jim snuck out of his parents’ flat to meet the friends he’d be protesting with. He was “excited and a little bit nervous.””I was thinking that this time I will be with the guys who are standing on the front lines,” Jim said. He wasn’t just going to give first aid on the sidelines this time.The day would end with part of the government’s headquarters in ruin and tear gas in the streets, scenes previously considered unthinkable in Hong Kong.Jim had become part of a “team” of about 20 protesters. Small cells have become commonplace in the leaderless protest movement and replaced traditional top-down organization. People join groups that decide what to do based on online chatter on Telegram, an encrypted messaging app, and an online forum called LIHKG that works like Reddit.This makes it harder for authorities to track protesters and jail their leaders, a strategy often referred to here as “cutting off the head of the snake.”Jim joined his cell after meeting a member of the team, who according to Jim, seemed brave, eloquent and persuasive. They all met up early in the morning on July 1, the anniversary of when Hong Kong was handed from Britain to China in 1997 under a “one country, two systems” framework that allowed the city more freedoms and its own legal system. That arrangement is due to expire in 2047, when Hong Kong will come under Beijing’s direct rule.Passengers look out from a bus at a burning barricade lit by pro-democracy protesters during a gathering in front of Mong Kok police station on Sunday, September 22, in Hong Kong, China. Pro-democracy protesters have continued demonstrations across Hong Kong, calling for the city's Chief Executive Carrie Lam to immediately meet the rest of their demands, including an independent inquiry into police brutality, the retraction of the word riot to describe the rallies, and genuine universal suffrage, as the territory faces a leadership crisis.Passengers look out from a bus at a burning barricade lit by pro-democracy protesters during a gathering in front of Mong Kok police station on Sunday, September 22, in Hong Kong, China. Pro-democracy protesters have continued demonstrations across Hong Kong, calling for the city's Chief Executive Carrie Lam to immediately meet the rest of their demands, including an independent inquiry into police brutality, the retraction of the word riot to describe the rallies, and genuine universal suffrage, as the territory faces a leadership crisis. Photos: Hong Kong unrestPassengers look out from a bus at a burning barricade lit by pro-democracy protesters during a gathering in front of Mong Kok police station on Sunday, September 22, in Hong Kong, China. Pro-democracy protesters have continued demonstrations across Hong Kong, calling for the city’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam to immediately meet the rest of their demands, including an independent inquiry into police brutality, the retraction of the word riot to describe the rallies, and genuine universal suffrage, as the territory faces a leadership crisis.Hide Caption 1 of 83Pro-democracy protesters sing songs and chant slogans during a rally inside a shopping mall in Shatin on September 22.Pro-democracy protesters sing songs and chant slogans during a rally inside a shopping mall in Shatin on September 22. Photos: Hong Kong unrestPro-democracy protesters sing songs and chant slogans during a rally inside a shopping mall in Shatin on September 22.Hide Caption 2 of 83An umbrella is abandoned near barricades during a protest in Hong Kong on Saturday, Sept. 21, 2019. Demonstrators have marched through an outlying district of Hong Kong in another weekend of protest aimed at the Chinese territory's government.An umbrella is abandoned near barricades during a protest in Hong Kong on Saturday, Sept. 21, 2019. Demonstrators have marched through an outlying district of Hong Kong in another weekend of protest aimed at the Chinese territory's government. Photos: Hong Kong unrestAn umbrella is abandoned near barricades during a protest in Hong Kong on Saturday, Sept. 21, 2019. Demonstrators have marched through an outlying district of Hong Kong in another weekend of protest aimed at the Chinese territory’s government.Hide Caption 3 of 83An anti-government protester throws a Molotov cocktail during a demonstration near Central Government Complex in Hong Kong on Sunday, September 15.An anti-government protester throws a Molotov cocktail during a demonstration near Central Government Complex in Hong Kong on Sunday, September 15. Photos: Hong Kong unrestAn anti-government protester throws a Molotov cocktail during a demonstration near Central Government Complex in Hong Kong on Sunday, September 15.Hide Caption 4 of 83A pro-China supporter, center, is escorted by police after confronting journalists in Hong Kong, on September 15.A pro-China supporter, center, is escorted by police after confronting journalists in Hong Kong, on September 15. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA pro-China supporter, center, is escorted by police after confronting journalists in Hong Kong, on September 15.Hide Caption 5 of 83Pro-government and anti-government supporters chant against one another at a shopping mall in Hong Kong on Friday, September 13. The sign translates to "Stop violence and curb chaos; safeguard Hong Kong."Pro-government and anti-government supporters chant against one another at a shopping mall in Hong Kong on Friday, September 13. The sign translates to "Stop violence and curb chaos; safeguard Hong Kong." Photos: Hong Kong unrestPro-government and anti-government supporters chant against one another at a shopping mall in Hong Kong on Friday, September 13. The sign translates to “Stop violence and curb chaos; safeguard Hong Kong.”Hide Caption 6 of 83Demonstrators hold up their cell phone lights as they form a human chain at the Peak, a tourist spot in Hong Kong, on September 13.Demonstrators hold up their cell phone lights as they form a human chain at the Peak, a tourist spot in Hong Kong, on September 13. Photos: Hong Kong unrestDemonstrators hold up their cell phone lights as they form a human chain at the Peak, a tourist spot in Hong Kong, on September 13.Hide Caption 7 of 83Police escort an injured man after he attacked protesters outside Prince Edward station in Hong Kong on Friday, September 6.Police escort an injured man after he attacked protesters outside Prince Edward station in Hong Kong on Friday, September 6. Photos: Hong Kong unrestPolice escort an injured man after he attacked protesters outside Prince Edward station in Hong Kong on Friday, September 6.Hide Caption 8 of 83Protesters burn paper money to pay their respects to injured protesters.Protesters burn paper money to pay their respects to injured protesters. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters burn paper money to pay their respects to injured protesters.Hide Caption 9 of 83Protesters prepare to clash with police outside the Mong Kok police station on September 6.Protesters prepare to clash with police outside the Mong Kok police station on September 6. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters prepare to clash with police outside the Mong Kok police station on September 6.Hide Caption 10 of 83A protester is detained by police at the Po Lam Mass Transit Railway station on Thursday, September 5.A protester is detained by police at the Po Lam Mass Transit Railway station on Thursday, September 5. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA protester is detained by police at the Po Lam Mass Transit Railway station on Thursday, September 5.Hide Caption 11 of 83A man watches televisions at a store in Hong Kong as Chief Executive Carrie Lam announces the withdrawal of the extradition bill on Wednesday, September 4.A man watches televisions at a store in Hong Kong as Chief Executive Carrie Lam announces the withdrawal of the extradition bill on Wednesday, September 4. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA man watches televisions at a store in Hong Kong as Chief Executive Carrie Lam announces the withdrawal of the extradition bill on Wednesday, September 4.Hide Caption 12 of 83A woman gets emotional on September 4 while paying her respects to protesters who were injured a few days earlier.A woman gets emotional on September 4 while paying her respects to protesters who were injured a few days earlier. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA woman gets emotional on September 4 while paying her respects to protesters who were injured a few days earlier.Hide Caption 13 of 83Police aim at protesters outside the Mong Kok police station on September 4.Police aim at protesters outside the Mong Kok police station on September 4. Photos: Hong Kong unrestPolice aim at protesters outside the Mong Kok police station on September 4.Hide Caption 14 of 83Demonstrators travel through a railway station during a rally on Tuesday, September 3.Demonstrators travel through a railway station during a rally on Tuesday, September 3. Photos: Hong Kong unrestDemonstrators travel through a railway station during a rally on Tuesday, September 3.Hide Caption 15 of 83Students wearing gas masks and helmets hold a banner that reads "five major demands are indispensable" at St. Francis' Canossian College in Hong Kong.Students wearing gas masks and helmets hold a banner that reads "five major demands are indispensable" at St. Francis' Canossian College in Hong Kong. Photos: Hong Kong unrestStudents wearing gas masks and helmets hold a banner that reads “five major demands are indispensable” at St. Francis’ Canossian College in Hong Kong.Hide Caption 16 of 83Protesters gather in the bus terminal at Hong Kong International Airport on Sunday, September 1. Hundreds of pro-democracy activists attempted to block transport routes to the city's airport.Protesters gather in the bus terminal at Hong Kong International Airport on Sunday, September 1. Hundreds of pro-democracy activists attempted to block transport routes to the city's airport. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters gather in the bus terminal at Hong Kong International Airport on Sunday, September 1. Hundreds of pro-democracy activists attempted to block transport routes to the city’s airport.Hide Caption 17 of 83A passenger walks to the airport on September 1 as pro-democracy protesters blocked a road outside the airport.A passenger walks to the airport on September 1 as pro-democracy protesters blocked a road outside the airport. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA passenger walks to the airport on September 1 as pro-democracy protesters blocked a road outside the airport.Hide Caption 18 of 83A protester uses a slingshot outside the Central Government Complex during clashes with police on Saturday, August 31. Thousands of pro-democracy protesters held an anti-government rally one day after several leading activists and lawmakers were arrested in a sweeping crackdown.A protester uses a slingshot outside the Central Government Complex during clashes with police on Saturday, August 31. Thousands of pro-democracy protesters held an anti-government rally one day after several leading activists and lawmakers were arrested in a sweeping crackdown. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA protester uses a slingshot outside the Central Government Complex during clashes with police on Saturday, August 31. Thousands of pro-democracy protesters held an anti-government rally one day after several leading activists and lawmakers were arrested in a sweeping crackdown.Hide Caption 19 of 83Protesters stand in front of a burning barricade as clashes with the police intensified on August 31.Protesters stand in front of a burning barricade as clashes with the police intensified on August 31. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters stand in front of a burning barricade as clashes with the police intensified on August 31.Hide Caption 20 of 83Protesters light a Molotov cocktail on August 31.Protesters light a Molotov cocktail on August 31. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters light a Molotov cocktail on August 31.Hide Caption 21 of 83Police officers move forward during clashes with protesters on August 31.Police officers move forward during clashes with protesters on August 31. Photos: Hong Kong unrestPolice officers move forward during clashes with protesters on August 31.Hide Caption 22 of 83Protesters take cover as policemen fire blue-colored water on them. Blue dye can be used to stain and identify masked protesters.Protesters take cover as policemen fire blue-colored water on them. Blue dye can be used to stain and identify masked protesters. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters take cover as policemen fire blue-colored water on them. Blue dye can be used to stain and identify masked protesters.Hide Caption 23 of 83A surveillance camera is covered with white paint during protests.A surveillance camera is covered with white paint during protests. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA surveillance camera is covered with white paint during protests.Hide Caption 24 of 83An overhead view shows protesters reacting after police fired tear gas on August 31.An overhead view shows protesters reacting after police fired tear gas on August 31. Photos: Hong Kong unrestAn overhead view shows protesters reacting after police fired tear gas on August 31.Hide Caption 25 of 83Pro-democracy activists Agnes Chow and Joshua Wong speak to the media after they were released on bail at the Eastern Magistrates Courts on Friday, August 30. They were arrested earlier the same day in a dragnet across Hong Kong.Pro-democracy activists Agnes Chow and Joshua Wong speak to the media after they were released on bail at the Eastern Magistrates Courts on Friday, August 30. They were arrested earlier the same day in a dragnet across Hong Kong. Photos: Hong Kong unrestPro-democracy activists Agnes Chow and Joshua Wong speak to the media after they were released on bail at the Eastern Magistrates Courts on Friday, August 30. They were arrested earlier the same day in a dragnet across Hong Kong.Hide Caption 26 of 83Protesters clash with police after a rally in Hong Kong's Tsuen Wan district on Sunday, August 25. <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/25/asia/hong-kong-protest-aug-25-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">It was one of the most violent nights</a> seen in Hong Kong since mass protests began in June.Protesters clash with police after a rally in Hong Kong's Tsuen Wan district on Sunday, August 25. <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/25/asia/hong-kong-protest-aug-25-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">It was one of the most violent nights</a> seen in Hong Kong since mass protests began in June. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters clash with police after a rally in Hong Kong’s Tsuen Wan district on Sunday, August 25. It was one of the most violent nights seen in Hong Kong since mass protests began in June.Hide Caption 27 of 83A police officer aims a gun in front of a protester on August 25.A police officer aims a gun in front of a protester on August 25. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA police officer aims a gun in front of a protester on August 25.Hide Caption 28 of 83Some protesters shine laser pointers at police lines on August 25.Some protesters shine laser pointers at police lines on August 25. Photos: Hong Kong unrestSome protesters shine laser pointers at police lines on August 25.Hide Caption 29 of 83Protesters and police clash on Saturday, August 24.Protesters and police clash on Saturday, August 24. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters and police clash on Saturday, August 24.Hide Caption 30 of 83Protesters pick up bricks to be used as projectiles on August 24.<br />Protesters pick up bricks to be used as projectiles on August 24.<br /> Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters pick up bricks to be used as projectiles on August 24.Hide Caption 31 of 83Police retreat after clashing with protesters on August 24.Police retreat after clashing with protesters on August 24. Photos: Hong Kong unrestPolice retreat after clashing with protesters on August 24.Hide Caption 32 of 83People link hands as they gather at the Tsim Sha Tsui waterfront on Friday, August 23. Protesters formed a human chain across Hong Kong in a show of solidarity.People link hands as they gather at the Tsim Sha Tsui waterfront on Friday, August 23. Protesters formed a human chain across Hong Kong in a show of solidarity. Photos: Hong Kong unrestPeople link hands as they gather at the Tsim Sha Tsui waterfront on Friday, August 23. Protesters formed a human chain across Hong Kong in a show of solidarity.Hide Caption 33 of 83Cell phones shine from the top of Lion Rock on August 23.Cell phones shine from the top of Lion Rock on August 23. Photos: Hong Kong unrestCell phones shine from the top of Lion Rock on August 23.Hide Caption 34 of 83Protesters march under umbrellas on Sunday, August 18.Protesters march under umbrellas on Sunday, August 18. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters march under umbrellas on Sunday, August 18.Hide Caption 35 of 83Tens of thousands of protesters showed up in the streets on August 18.Tens of thousands of protesters showed up in the streets on August 18. Photos: Hong Kong unrestTens of thousands of protesters showed up in the streets on August 18.Hide Caption 36 of 83A protester participates in a march on Saturday, August 17. His eye is covered with red gauze, referencing a woman who was allegedly shot in the eye with a beanbag round during clashes between protesters and police.A protester participates in a march on Saturday, August 17. His eye is covered with red gauze, referencing a woman who was allegedly shot in the eye with a beanbag round during clashes between protesters and police. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA protester participates in a march on Saturday, August 17. His eye is covered with red gauze, referencing a woman who was allegedly shot in the eye with a beanbag round during clashes between protesters and police.Hide Caption 37 of 83A protester ties a white ribbon, symbolizing the pure intentions of young protesters, during a march organized by teachers in Hong Kong on August 17.A protester ties a white ribbon, symbolizing the pure intentions of young protesters, during a march organized by teachers in Hong Kong on August 17. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA protester ties a white ribbon, symbolizing the pure intentions of young protesters, during a march organized by teachers in Hong Kong on August 17.Hide Caption 38 of 83Protesters react after police fired tear gas to disperse a demonstration at the Sham Shui Po police station in Hong Kong on Wednesday, August 14.Protesters react after police fired tear gas to disperse a demonstration at the Sham Shui Po police station in Hong Kong on Wednesday, August 14. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters react after police fired tear gas to disperse a demonstration at the Sham Shui Po police station in Hong Kong on Wednesday, August 14.Hide Caption 39 of 83Protesters point lasers at the Sham Shui Po police station on August 14.Protesters point lasers at the Sham Shui Po police station on August 14. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters point lasers at the Sham Shui Po police station on August 14.Hide Caption 40 of 83A police officer falls over an airport luggage trolley during a scuffle with pro-democracy protesters on Tuesday, August 13. For two days, <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/13/asia/hong-kong-airport-chaos-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">protesters flooded the airport.</a> Check-ins were suspended and dozens of outgoing flights were canceled.A police officer falls over an airport luggage trolley during a scuffle with pro-democracy protesters on Tuesday, August 13. For two days, <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/13/asia/hong-kong-airport-chaos-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">protesters flooded the airport.</a> Check-ins were suspended and dozens of outgoing flights were canceled. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA police officer falls over an airport luggage trolley during a scuffle with pro-democracy protesters on Tuesday, August 13. For two days, protesters flooded the airport. Check-ins were suspended and dozens of outgoing flights were canceled.Hide Caption 41 of 83Police use pepper spray to disperse protesters at the airport on August 13.Police use pepper spray to disperse protesters at the airport on August 13. Photos: Hong Kong unrestPolice use pepper spray to disperse protesters at the airport on August 13.Hide Caption 42 of 83Police and protesters clash at the airport on August 13. The violence came after Hong Kong's Airport Authority announced that all check-in services would be suspended for another night because of terminal operations being "seriously disrupted."Police and protesters clash at the airport on August 13. The violence came after Hong Kong's Airport Authority announced that all check-in services would be suspended for another night because of terminal operations being "seriously disrupted." Photos: Hong Kong unrestPolice and protesters clash at the airport on August 13. The violence came after Hong Kong’s Airport Authority announced that all check-in services would be suspended for another night because of terminal operations being “seriously disrupted.”Hide Caption 43 of 83A traveler passes her luggage to security guards as she tries to enter the departures gate.A traveler passes her luggage to security guards as she tries to enter the departures gate. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA traveler passes her luggage to security guards as she tries to enter the departures gate.Hide Caption 44 of 83A display board shows canceled flights on August 13.A display board shows canceled flights on August 13. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA display board shows canceled flights on August 13.Hide Caption 45 of 83Anti-government protesters stand at a barricade made of luggage trolleys during a demonstration at the airport on August 13.Anti-government protesters stand at a barricade made of luggage trolleys during a demonstration at the airport on August 13. Photos: Hong Kong unrestAnti-government protesters stand at a barricade made of luggage trolleys during a demonstration at the airport on August 13.Hide Caption 46 of 83Medics look after a woman who received a facial injury during clashes on Sunday, August 11.Medics look after a woman who received a facial injury during clashes on Sunday, August 11. Photos: Hong Kong unrestMedics look after a woman who received a facial injury during clashes on Sunday, August 11.Hide Caption 47 of 83A pro-democracy protester is held by police outside the Tsim Sha Tsui police station on August 11.A pro-democracy protester is held by police outside the Tsim Sha Tsui police station on August 11. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA pro-democracy protester is held by police outside the Tsim Sha Tsui police station on August 11.Hide Caption 48 of 83Police fire tear gas at protesters during a demonstration in the Wong Tai Sin District on Monday, August 5.Police fire tear gas at protesters during a demonstration in the Wong Tai Sin District on Monday, August 5. Photos: Hong Kong unrestPolice fire tear gas at protesters during a demonstration in the Wong Tai Sin District on Monday, August 5.Hide Caption 49 of 83A train passenger gestures toward a protester, right, who was preventing the doors of a train from closing on August 5. The protester was trying to disrupt Hong Kong's morning rush-hour commute.A train passenger gestures toward a protester, right, who was preventing the doors of a train from closing on August 5. The protester was trying to disrupt Hong Kong's morning rush-hour commute. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA train passenger gestures toward a protester, right, who was preventing the doors of a train from closing on August 5. The protester was trying to disrupt Hong Kong’s morning rush-hour commute.Hide Caption 50 of 83A man lies down on an underground train during a protest on August 5.A man lies down on an underground train during a protest on August 5. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA man lies down on an underground train during a protest on August 5.Hide Caption 51 of 83A man comforts his pregnant wife near a train platform after protesters blocked the train doors on August 5.A man comforts his pregnant wife near a train platform after protesters blocked the train doors on August 5. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA man comforts his pregnant wife near a train platform after protesters blocked the train doors on August 5.Hide Caption 52 of 83A protester stands in tear gas during a confrontation with police in the early hours of Sunday, August 4.A protester stands in tear gas during a confrontation with police in the early hours of Sunday, August 4. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA protester stands in tear gas during a confrontation with police in the early hours of Sunday, August 4.Hide Caption 53 of 83A Chinese flag floats in water after it was thrown by protesters during a demonstration on Saturday, August 3.A Chinese flag floats in water after it was thrown by protesters during a demonstration on Saturday, August 3. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA Chinese flag floats in water after it was thrown by protesters during a demonstration on Saturday, August 3.Hide Caption 54 of 83A protester sprays paint on a wall on August 3.A protester sprays paint on a wall on August 3. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA protester sprays paint on a wall on August 3.Hide Caption 55 of 83Members of Hong Kong's medical sector attend a protest in Edinburgh Place on Friday, August 2.Members of Hong Kong's medical sector attend a protest in Edinburgh Place on Friday, August 2. Photos: Hong Kong unrestMembers of Hong Kong’s medical sector attend a protest in Edinburgh Place on Friday, August 2.Hide Caption 56 of 83The emblem on the China Liaison Office is protected by plexiglass during a demonstration on Sunday, July 28.The emblem on the China Liaison Office is protected by plexiglass during a demonstration on Sunday, July 28. Photos: Hong Kong unrestThe emblem on the China Liaison Office is protected by plexiglass during a demonstration on Sunday, July 28.Hide Caption 57 of 83A protester flees from baton-wielding police in the Yuen Long district of Hong Kong on Saturday, July 27.A protester flees from baton-wielding police in the Yuen Long district of Hong Kong on Saturday, July 27. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA protester flees from baton-wielding police in the Yuen Long district of Hong Kong on Saturday, July 27.Hide Caption 58 of 83A protester looks through umbrellas during the clashes with police on July 27.A protester looks through umbrellas during the clashes with police on July 27. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA protester looks through umbrellas during the clashes with police on July 27.Hide Caption 59 of 83Travelers watch as protesters rally at Hong Kong's international airport on Friday, July 26.Travelers watch as protesters rally at Hong Kong's international airport on Friday, July 26. Photos: Hong Kong unrestTravelers watch as protesters rally at Hong Kong’s international airport on Friday, July 26.Hide Caption 60 of 83Protesters clash with police on Sunday, July 21.Protesters clash with police on Sunday, July 21. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters clash with police on Sunday, July 21.Hide Caption 61 of 83Masked men in white T-shirts are seen after <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2019/07/23/asia/hong-kong-triad-arrests-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">attacking anti-extradition bill demonstrators</a> at a train station in Yuen Long.Masked men in white T-shirts are seen after <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2019/07/23/asia/hong-kong-triad-arrests-intl-hnk/index.html" target="_blank">attacking anti-extradition bill demonstrators</a> at a train station in Yuen Long. Photos: Hong Kong unrestMasked men in white T-shirts are seen after attacking anti-extradition bill demonstrators at a train station in Yuen Long.Hide Caption 62 of 83Medical workers help a protester affected by tear gas on July 21.Medical workers help a protester affected by tear gas on July 21. Photos: Hong Kong unrestMedical workers help a protester affected by tear gas on July 21.Hide Caption 63 of 83The office of pro-Beijing lawmaker Junius Ho was trashed by protesters in Hong Kong's Tsuen Wan district.The office of pro-Beijing lawmaker Junius Ho was trashed by protesters in Hong Kong's Tsuen Wan district. Photos: Hong Kong unrestThe office of pro-Beijing lawmaker Junius Ho was trashed by protesters in Hong Kong’s Tsuen Wan district.Hide Caption 64 of 83Police officers use pepper spray to disperse protesters after a rally in the Sheung Shui district on Saturday, July 13. Police officers use pepper spray to disperse protesters after a rally in the Sheung Shui district on Saturday, July 13. Photos: Hong Kong unrestPolice officers use pepper spray to disperse protesters after a rally in the Sheung Shui district on Saturday, July 13. Hide Caption 65 of 83A demonstrator sprays paint inside a chamber at Hong Kong's Legislative Council building, where protesters forced their way in on Monday, July 1.A demonstrator sprays paint inside a chamber at Hong Kong's Legislative Council building, where protesters forced their way in on Monday, July 1. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA demonstrator sprays paint inside a chamber at Hong Kong’s Legislative Council building, where protesters forced their way in on Monday, July 1.Hide Caption 66 of 83The meeting hall of the Legislative Council is taken over by demonstrators on July 1.The meeting hall of the Legislative Council is taken over by demonstrators on July 1. Photos: Hong Kong unrestThe meeting hall of the Legislative Council is taken over by demonstrators on July 1.Hide Caption 67 of 83A protester smashes a window of the Legislative Council building.A protester smashes a window of the Legislative Council building. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA protester smashes a window of the Legislative Council building.Hide Caption 68 of 83Columns of sunlight are cast on a crowd during the march on July 1.Columns of sunlight are cast on a crowd during the march on July 1. Photos: Hong Kong unrestColumns of sunlight are cast on a crowd during the march on July 1.Hide Caption 69 of 83Helicopters carrying the flags of China and Hong Kong fly over demonstrators on July 1.Helicopters carrying the flags of China and Hong Kong fly over demonstrators on July 1. Photos: Hong Kong unrestHelicopters carrying the flags of China and Hong Kong fly over demonstrators on July 1.Hide Caption 70 of 83Pro-democracy lawmaker Roy Kwong rallies demonstrators with a megaphone on July 1.Pro-democracy lawmaker Roy Kwong rallies demonstrators with a megaphone on July 1. Photos: Hong Kong unrestPro-democracy lawmaker Roy Kwong rallies demonstrators with a megaphone on July 1.Hide Caption 71 of 83A police officer uses pepper spray during a clash with protesters on July 1.A police officer uses pepper spray during a clash with protesters on July 1. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA police officer uses pepper spray during a clash with protesters on July 1.Hide Caption 72 of 83A protester wearing a T-shirt with the word "revolution" walks past an inscription on a road that reads "Long Live HK."A protester wearing a T-shirt with the word "revolution" walks past an inscription on a road that reads "Long Live HK." Photos: Hong Kong unrestA protester wearing a T-shirt with the word “revolution” walks past an inscription on a road that reads “Long Live HK.”Hide Caption 73 of 83Police detain protesters near the government headquarters in Hong Kong on July 1.Police detain protesters near the government headquarters in Hong Kong on July 1. Photos: Hong Kong unrestPolice detain protesters near the government headquarters in Hong Kong on July 1.Hide Caption 74 of 83An overhead view shows thousands of protesters marching through a Hong Kong street on Sunday, June 16.An overhead view shows thousands of protesters marching through a Hong Kong street on Sunday, June 16. Photos: Hong Kong unrestAn overhead view shows thousands of protesters marching through a Hong Kong street on Sunday, June 16.Hide Caption 75 of 83Protesters run after police fired tear gas on Wednesday, June 12.Protesters run after police fired tear gas on Wednesday, June 12. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters run after police fired tear gas on Wednesday, June 12.Hide Caption 76 of 83Protesters face off with police during the rally on June 12.Protesters face off with police during the rally on June 12. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters face off with police during the rally on June 12.Hide Caption 77 of 83By the morning of June 12, tens of thousands of mainly young people had arrived in the area, blocking streets and bringing central Hong Kong to a standstill.By the morning of June 12, tens of thousands of mainly young people had arrived in the area, blocking streets and bringing central Hong Kong to a standstill. Photos: Hong Kong unrestBy the morning of June 12, tens of thousands of mainly young people had arrived in the area, blocking streets and bringing central Hong Kong to a standstill.Hide Caption 78 of 83A demonstrator holds a sign during the June 12 rally.A demonstrator holds a sign during the June 12 rally. Photos: Hong Kong unrestA demonstrator holds a sign during the June 12 rally.Hide Caption 79 of 83Police officers charge toward protesters during clashes on Monday, June 10. It was a continuation of protests that started the day before.Police officers charge toward protesters during clashes on Monday, June 10. It was a continuation of protests that started the day before. Photos: Hong Kong unrestPolice officers charge toward protesters during clashes on Monday, June 10. It was a continuation of protests that started the day before.Hide Caption 80 of 83Protesters hold pictures of Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam on Sunday, June 9.Protesters hold pictures of Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam on Sunday, June 9. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters hold pictures of Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam on Sunday, June 9.Hide Caption 81 of 83Protesters on June 9 waved placards and wore white -- the designated color of the rally. "Hong Kong, never give up!" some chanted.Protesters on June 9 waved placards and wore white -- the designated color of the rally. "Hong Kong, never give up!" some chanted. Photos: Hong Kong unrestProtesters on June 9 waved placards and wore white — the designated color of the rally. “Hong Kong, never give up!” some chanted.Hide Caption 82 of 83Students wear chains during a demonstration on Saturday, June 8.Students wear chains during a demonstration on Saturday, June 8. Photos: Hong Kong unrestStudents wear chains during a demonstration on Saturday, June 8.Hide Caption 83 of 8301 hong kong unrest 092202 hong kong unrest 092201 hong kong unrest 092101 hong kong 091502 hong kong 091501 hong kong protests 091302 hong kong protests 091301 hong kong protest 090603 hong kong protest 090604 hong kong protest 090601 hong kong protests 090502 hong kong 090403 hong kong 090405 hong kong 090404 hong kong 0903 RESTRICTED03 hong kong protest 090204 hong kong protest 090101 hong kong protests 090102 hong kong protests 083107 hong kong protests 083106 hong kong protests 083103 hong kong protests 083104 hong kong protests 083105 hong kong protests 0831bpt102 hong kong protests 0831201902 hong kong protests 083001 hong kong protest unf 082501 hk pistol 082503 hong kong protest unf 082502 hong kong protests 082404 hong kong protests 082405 hong kong protests 082402 hong kong protests 082307 hong kong protests 082302 hk protests 081803 hk protests 081806 hk protests 081807 hk protests08 hong kong 081409 hong kong 081417 hong kong 081312b hong kong 081311 hong kong 081303 hong kong 081313 hong kong 0813 RESTRICTED08 hong kong 0813hong kong protest 0811 0304b hong kong protest 081110 hong kong 080501 hong kong 080502 hong kong 080505 hong kong 080501 hong kong protest 080402 hong kong protests 080303 hong kong protests 080304 hong kong protests 080309 hong kong protests06 hong kong protests12 hong kong protests01 hong kong protest 072611 hong kong protest 072101 hong kong unrest 072201 hong kong protest 072101 hong kong protest 072201 hong kong protests 071321 hong kong protest 070122 hong kong protest 070106 hong kong protest 0701 RESTRICTED20 hong kong protest 070104 hong kong protest 0701 RESTRICTED09 hong kong protest 070111 hong kong protest 070107 hong kong protest 07010701 HK rallies 02HK rallies25 hong kong protests 061221 hong kong protests 06120612 HK protests 1020 hong kong protests 061224 Hong Kong Extradition 061004 Hong Kong Extradition Protest02 hong kong protests 060901 hong kong protest 0608Before this year, pro-democracy protesters had peacefully marched each year on July 1 to mark the occasion.”Protest is ingrained in the Hong Kong psyche. It’s just a very normal thing to do,” said Leslie, a 24-year-old protester and former English teacher. Leslie isn’t her real name. She asked that CNN change it due to fears of reprisals.In 1997, 2047 was a long way off for a teenager. They’d likely be retired by then. But Jim and Leslie will be in their 40s and 50s, respectively. “The future of Hong Kong really depends on the next few months, maybe the next few years, and how this movement pans out,” Leslie said.With that in mind, more than 500,000 turned out for this year’s July 1 rally which begins at Victoria Park each year, according to organizers’ estimates. Yet that’s not where Jim and his team went. They met in Admiralty, outside the government’s headquarters.Calvin was already there by the time Jim arrived. The 18-year-old university student had spent the night sleeping on the ground nearby, with only a power bank to charge his phone and the clothes on his back. He wanted to be one of the first protesters there.Protesters stand behind barricades outside the government headquarters the morning of July 1.Protesters stand behind barricades outside the government headquarters the morning of July 1.Protesters stand behind barricades outside the government headquarters the morning of July 1.As the day went on, thousands more arrived.People dressed in black and with masks covering their faces began pulling railings from the sidewalks to use as barricades. Some started to dig up bricks from the walkways. Calvin said that at about 2 p.m., a few proposed breaking into the government’s legislative complex, known as LegCo.At first, Calvin didn’t think it was a good idea. His instinct was to push back against violence and destruction. And he didn’t think the public would support it. Neither did Jim. He didn’t think violence was the answer.”I’ve never seen this kind of stuff before,” he said he thought at the time. But both ended up doing what teenagers often do. They followed their friends.”They’re still my teammates,” Jim said. “Whatever they do, I won’t walk away.” Some of Calvin’s friends were at the front, trying to break the glass doors leading into LegCo. He chose a middle ground: stand guard with an umbrella as other protesters smashed the doors with makeshift battering rams.Protesters attempt to break a window at the government headquarters in Hong Kong on July 1.Protesters attempt to break a window at the government headquarters in Hong Kong on July 1.Protesters attempt to break a window at the government headquarters in Hong Kong on July 1.Police standing inside the government headquarters look at protesters who tried to smash their way into the building.Police standing inside the government headquarters look at protesters who tried to smash their way into the building.Police standing inside the government headquarters look at protesters who tried to smash their way into the building.With every violent push, the protesters chipped away at the barriers standing in their way. A handful of police officers stood on the other side of the glass. They warned people to stop or they would use force. Protesters smash glass doors and windows to break into the parliament chamber of Legislative Council Complex on July 1.Protesters smash glass doors and windows to break into the parliament chamber of Legislative Council Complex on July 1.Protesters smash glass doors and windows to break into the parliament chamber of Legislative Council Complex on July 1.By 9 p.m., the crowd finally made it inside. The police had vanished. Hundreds of protesters stormed in, cheering, waving their hands and celebrating their victory.Then they vandalized everything in sight. They shattered more glass doors. They destroyed computers. They tore down portraits. They spray-painted “HK Gov f**king disgrace” on the wall.”Liberate Hong Kong, the revolution of our time,” they chanted.Many thought protesters went too far by ransacking government property. Hong Kong is famously clean, efficient and safe. It boasts one of the world’s lowest violent crime rates. Wanton destruction, mob violence and that level of vandalism are incredibly rare.But as Calvin set foot in the building, he said he felt inspired.With a successful strike at the symbolic heart of Hong Kong’s unelected leader, Carrie Lam, Calvin thought the protesters were able to make an important point — that “the government has already (sic) lose its legitimacy.”Once they reached the building’s second floor, some started battering the entrance to the legislative chamber. It took them 30 minutes to get in. Once inside, one protester ripped apart a copy of the Basic Law, which acts as Hong Kong’s mini-constitution. Another climbed up and spray-painted the city’s emblem in black. Then they erected the British colonial flag.Chaotic scenes inside LegCo.Chaotic scenes inside LegCo.Chaotic scenes inside LegCo.Jim stayed inside for about 45 minutes, helping those who were spraying some of the graffiti that would become symbols of the protesters’ anti-government fury. Then news that police had warned of an impending clearance operation circulated through LegCo, which was trashed by this point.”Everyone was scared,” Jim said.Protesters like Jim left on their own terms. But his team learned on Telegram that four protesters had stayed. So Jim and his friends chose to join hundreds of others who went back inside to convince those who remained to leave.Everyone departed minutes before riot police arrived, firing tear gas toward the retreating crowd.Jim felt like he belonged. At that moment, strangers felt like family.”Even though we don’t know each other, we have the same goal … we can’t leave anyone behind,” Jim said. “I nearly cried because it felt very touching.”Police fire tear gas at protesters near the government headquarters on July 2.Police fire tear gas at protesters near the government headquarters on July 2.Police fire tear gas at protesters near the government headquarters on July 2.Joining the fightBobo watched the events of July 1 and June 12 unfold from Canada, where she was attending university.The 20-something Hong Kong native had a cute little dog and hoped to stay in the country once she graduated. Maybe she’d teach children. For now, she liked to grab drinks with friends at night and play bar games. Darts was one of her favorites. But she was enraged watching police fire rubber bullets at protesters.”I cannot just study overseas without coming back to join this fight,” she recalled thinking. So in early July, Bobo left her beloved toy poodle with a friend and booked a ticket home to Hong Kong. She began administering a group on Telegram called Bobo, which means “baby” in Cantonese, and grew it into one of the biggest and most reliable Hong Kong protest channels — with nearly 30,000 members to date.On the group, she sends regular updates about gatherings, police movements and other real-time news. She asked that CNN not use her real name and just refer to her as Bobo, fearing that police would target her. Bobo supported the protesters who stormed LegCo on July 1. She called them heroes.Their actions, she said, were “a symbol to tell the others” that Hong Kongers would not accept the current government.Bobo has a history of political activism. She — and Calvin — were both involved in the 2014 pro-democracy Umbrella Movement, when protesters took to the streets of Hong Kong seeking universal suffrage. Those peaceful protests simply fizzled out without achieving any political change after the government waged a slow war of attrition. Many of the movement’s top leaders were eventually jailed. Calvin and Bobo both said they were angry after the so-called Umbrella Revolution ended. They had given peace a chance. Now it was time for something else, and many others agreed.A series of on-site surveys of protesters conducted in June by several Hong Kong-based academics found that about half of the respondents “believed that peaceful, rational and non-violent protest was no longer useful.””More and more participants considered radical protests to be more effective in making the government heed public opinion,” it said.Edmund Cheng, a professor of political science at Hong Kong Baptist University and one of the report’s authors, said the research shows that even those who aren’t thrilled about violence aren’t going to stand in others’ way.”They may not approve of the violent actions of a small group of radical protesters, they still consider them as working toward a common goal,” Cheng said. The vandalism at LegCo on July 1 was a landmark moment for Hong Kong and its young people. The stage was set, and the summer was about to get more violent. People walk past signs and posters outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong on July 2.People walk past signs and posters outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong on July 2.People walk past signs and posters outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong on July 2.Desperate and hopelessAs the weeks turned to months, protesters graduated from throwing water bottles and umbrellas at riot police to bricks and Molotov cocktails. Police said rioters threw as many as 100 petrol bombs during the final weekend of August.Protesters frame militancy as a necessary evil. They say their violence is only directed toward police and government. It’s a far cry from lethal force and is escalated only if police escalate first, they say.A Molotov cocktail is thrown by protesters in August. A Molotov cocktail is thrown by protesters in August. A Molotov cocktail is thrown by protesters in August. Bobo and other protesters say Molotov cocktails and fire barricades are used to delay authorities and help protesters hold a line as others flee.”We use them for self-defense, to maintain a distance between ourselves and the police. We all knew that we would be beaten up heavily if police were to come over,” Bobo said.Some admit the violence has at times crossed a line.On August 12 and 13, protesters stormed Hong Kong’s airport. Hundreds of flights were canceled and chaos ensued. Two mainland Chinese nationals were detained by a mob on the second day. They were accused of being undercover officers. The mob stopped first responders from getting one of the men to an ambulance after he appeared to lose consciousness. The second, who turned out to be a reporter for Chinese state media, was aggressively searched and then ziptied to a luggage cart.Many protesters made an effort the next day to apologize, recognizing they may have erred.”People are desperate, people are hopeless, so they want to try all the means possible that lead to victory,” said Andy Chan, an independence advocate and the founder of the Hong Kong National Party (HKNP), which the government banned on national security grounds last year. Critics say the move was politically motivated.”Things may turn ugly sometimes but the crowd is always be able to self correct,” he said of the scenes at the airport.Chan was arrested twice last month, first on charges of possession of offensive weapons and then for alleged protest-related offenses. He denied the weapons allegations in an interview with CNN before his second arrest.His second arrest happened at the airport while he was on his way to a conference in Japan. Chan said he was then held 44 hours before being released on bail. He has not been formally charged and no court date has been set, but police are investigating the case.Chan said that he believes it’s time for protesters to fight back against what he and many believe are increasingly heavy-handed tactics by police.”In the past few years, we have experienced the violence of the police. Many of us agreed that we need to self-defend against the police,” he said.Police say their actions this summer have been in response to illegal activity. Tear gas and rubber bullets, they say, are used to disperse riots or illegal gatherings. A senior Hong Kong police officer told reporters at a briefing last month that they do not use force unless protesters use violence.Protesters set a fire on August 31.Protesters set a fire on August 31.Protesters set a fire on August 31.Almost all the protesters who spoke to CNN said this summer has changed the way they feel about police. Nearly every one brings up the incident in the suburb of Yuen Long on July 21, when police were accused of looking the other way while a mob beat up protesters and passersby at a subway station. Police said the delayed response was because the two officers responding to the scene “did not have protective gears” and were waiting for reinforcements.Several said they now hated the police. Others spoke in even more vitriolic terms.”When you go to school and you’re very young, the teachers teach you that if you need help, you call the police,” Jim said. “No one trusts the police anymore.”Leslie, the 24-year-old English tutor, expressed a similar sentiment. When it comes to violence, she said protesters will lose public support if they’re seen as the ones escalating against police.”Things that may be morally inappropriate may be necessary,” she said.”Nothing will change if the current situation continues.”Bobo went even further. “I will not cut ties with them even if someone kills a police officer,” she said.Bobo said that before this summer she trusted the police.”But at this moment, they are worse than dogs. They are even worse than rats crossing the street,” she said.”Anyone with (a) conscience will not stay inside the police force. You are not a good person if you decide to stay.”The most extreme protesters want this to go further — they want to take on the Chinese military. They’re not scared by reports that the People’s Armed Police, a paramilitary force, had been temporarily deployed across the border in Shenzhen. Nor are they worried about Beijing and Hong Kong sounding the alarm over “signs of terror.”They’ve embraced a philosophy of “if we burn, you burn with us,” a phrase popularized by “The Hunger Games” books.These attitudes worry extremism expert Brian Levin.Levin, who runs the Center for Hate and Extremism at California State University San Bernardino, said using violence — even as a limited and calculated tool — can have dangerous consequences.”When some expression of violence is tolerated, that can unravel quite quickly. And when it does, it gets worse for everybody,” he said.Graffiti outside Hong Kong's Tung Chung subway station reads "burn with us."Graffiti outside Hong Kong's Tung Chung subway station reads "burn with us."Graffiti outside Hong Kong’s Tung Chung subway station reads “burn with us.”‘It’s just like a dream’Bobo now goes to as many demonstrations as she can. Sometimes she’s up until 3 a.m. or 4 a.m. keeping the Telegram channel up to date. She wakes up for work three hours later and goes to her desk job.Nowadays, Bobo brings a will to protests should she be killed. In it, she calls on her fellow protesters to continue the fight.”Every time when I go out, I worry that I may die,” she said. “I worry about (losing my future), but I am more scared that Hong Kong will be lost.”Leslie, Jim and Calvin said they’ve been to most of the protests. All three say they’re motivated not just by ideology, but by the camaraderie they find on the front lines. Protesters liken themselves to brothers and sisters in arms, fighting for freedom together despite not knowing one another. Many often say one day they hope they can take off their masks and embrace one another.For now, Calvin said it’s like he’s living a double life. “I go to the protest, and it’s just like a dream, and when I wake up, it just ends,” he said.Leslie quit her tutoring job to fully commit to the cause. When she’s not at a demonstration, she’s helping with the translation and publication of protest materials.”I can’t really remember what it was like in June now,” she said.For many protesters, the summer has taken an emotional toll. Leslie now goes to a demonstration expecting tear gas and rubber bullets. Much of the time, she said she’s numb to the violence.”But the amount of times I’ve broken down says I just haven’t found the right outlet for expressing my emotions,” she said.Jim, the high school student, no longer fears taking on the police.At a protest at the end of August, he said he found himself on the ground staring at a police baton after helping up a fellow protester who had fallen over.A member of the Hong Kong police’s Special Tactical Squad was standing over him, he recalled.A police officer from the Special Tactical Squad, nicknamed the "raptors," arrests a protester on August 11.A police officer from the Special Tactical Squad, nicknamed the "raptors," arrests a protester on August 11.A police officer from the Special Tactical Squad, nicknamed the “raptors,” arrests a protester on August 11.These aren’t your average police. They dress in black, head to toe, and it’s their job to go in and aggressively pluck out protesters for arrest after riot police fire tear gas. The squad has earned a reputation for violence, so much so that they’re known locally as “raptors.”As Jim locked eyes with this raptor, he vowed not to go down without a fight. Rioting convictions can carry up to 10 years in prison. He didn’t want to spend his formative years behind bars.”I just wanted to get away,” he said.An officer walks in the Tung Chung subway station on September 1.An officer walks in the Tung Chung subway station on September 1.An officer walks in the Tung Chung subway station on September 1.First he went for the jugular. Jim said he grabbed the raptor’s throat, only to find he was wearing protective neck gear.So he went lower. Jim said he kicked the raptor in the groin, causing him to keel over in pain and giving the young protester enough time to make a run for it.In the seconds he made his getaway, Jim said he saw a protester throw a Molotov cocktail.People cheered. Police drew back, Jim said, effectively ensuring he was able to escape.But that freedom wouldn’t last.Jim and several members of his team were arrested days later for possession of offensive weapons. Jim said all they had on them were a few laser pointers. Police have started classifying laser pointers as weapons because they’ve been used at demonstrations to distract officers and members of the media, but they can also blind people.Jim called his arrest “unreasonable.” He has since been bailed out.The summer’s events have surprised even Jim. In mere weeks, he transformed from apolitical student who just wanted practice first-aid to a passionate activist and frontline protester with a rap sheet. “Before these events happened, I think actually I’m not quite important or political. Like, I’m just a student and I can’t do anything on my own,” he said.”Now I know that everyone is very important, and when we have a lot of people joining together, we can be very powerful.”

Source Link:
https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/26/asia/hong-kong-protest-violence-intl-hnk/index.html

[-0.434494]

Comments

comments

Advertisement