(CNN)Coastal Alabama and the Florida Panhandle face a daunting recovery Thursday, as ponds of floodwater and chunks of debris surround homes and businesses a day after a deadly Hurricane Sally walloped the coast with winds and feet of rain.

Sally’s remnants still threaten more flooding Thursday as they push into Georgia and the Carolinas.But it already has left plenty of misery along the Gulf Coast. At least one person is dead and one is missing in Alabama’s Orange Beach, Mayor Tony Kennon told CNN affiliate WSFA, after Sally blew ashore as a Category 2 hurricane early Wednesday.Water submerges a road along a commercial strip Thursday morning in Gulf Shores, Alabama, a day after Hurricane Sally struck.Water submerges a road along a commercial strip Thursday morning in Gulf Shores, Alabama, a day after Hurricane Sally struck.Water submerges a road along a commercial strip Thursday morning in Gulf Shores, Alabama, a day after Hurricane Sally struck.In both states, including around Pensacola in Florida, downed trees and power lines have made roads dangerous, and authorities have set up curfews and used boats and high-water vehicles to help hundreds escape their flooded or flood-surrounded homes.In Orange Beach, coastal neighborhoods remained covered by water hours after the storm.Read More”Everything on the ground floor is gone,” Matt Wilson told CNN affiliate WPMI Wednesday about his Orange Beach home, where he and his family rode out part of the deluge.”Our house had windows blow out at 3 a.m. or 4 a.m. (Wednesday) and the whole house was shaking like a boat on the water,” he said. ” … We ended up leaving the house during the eye of the storm, and waded through about 5 feet of water to get to the neighbor’s house, arm in arm.”Sally moved extremely slowly over these areas, dumping sheets of rain — in some places 2 feet or more — that caused extensive flooding for miles.”We had 30 inches of rain in Pensacola — 30-plus inches of rain — which is four months of rain in four hours,” Pensacola Fire Chief Ginny Cranor said.”My house is full of water. I’ve got 2 to 6 inches full of water in my house, everywhere,” Freeport, Florida, resident Terry Morgan told CNN affiliate WJHG. In the Alabama resort town of Gulf Shores, Mike Vansickler told WPMI he rode out the storm in his condominium, only to kayak himself further inland later. The National Guard and rescue teams used high-water vehicles to traverse streets there, while others traveled by canoe or waded.Water surrounds businesses and homes Thursday morning in Gulf Shores, Alabama, a day after Hurricane Sally struck.Water surrounds businesses and homes Thursday morning in Gulf Shores, Alabama, a day after Hurricane Sally struck.Water surrounds businesses and homes Thursday morning in Gulf Shores, Alabama, a day after Hurricane Sally struck.Water still was lapping up against homes Thursday in places like Gulf Shores and Pensacola, and more than 480,000 people in the two states still were without power Thursday morning, utility tracker PowerOutage.us showed.Florida resident Tammy Gibbs and her family are staying with a friend who has a generator, a day after police and National Guard troops used a kayak and a jet ski to help them from their home near Perdido Bay east of Pensacola, she told CNN affiliate WBMA.”She looked out the window at the house, and she was like, ‘Gammy, the ocean’s in our yard,'” Gibbs told WBMA, recounting her 3-year-old daughter’s conversation with her grandmother.Sally was the fourth hurricane to make landfall in the United States this year — the most to hit by the same date in 16 years. It came ashore 16 years to the day after Category 3 Hurricane Ivan struck roughly the same areas.Downed trees and flooding are seen in West Pensacola, Florida, on Wednesday, September 16.Downed trees and flooding are seen in West Pensacola, Florida, on Wednesday, September 16. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingDowned trees and flooding are seen in West Pensacola, Florida, on Wednesday, September 16.Hide Caption 1 of 16Members of the Pace Fire Rescue department wade through a flooded road after Hurricane Sally passed through the area on September 16, in Pensacola, Florida.Members of the Pace Fire Rescue department wade through a flooded road after Hurricane Sally passed through the area on September 16, in Pensacola, Florida. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingMembers of the Pace Fire Rescue department wade through a flooded road after Hurricane Sally passed through the area on September 16, in Pensacola, Florida.Hide Caption 2 of 16A person views a flooded neighborhood as Hurricane Sally passed through the area on September 16, in Pensacola, Florida.A person views a flooded neighborhood as Hurricane Sally passed through the area on September 16, in Pensacola, Florida. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingA person views a flooded neighborhood as Hurricane Sally passed through the area on September 16, in Pensacola, Florida.Hide Caption 3 of 16A man holds onto his hat in the strong wind during Hurricane Sally landfall in Mobile, Alabama, on September 16.A man holds onto his hat in the strong wind during Hurricane Sally landfall in Mobile, Alabama, on September 16. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingA man holds onto his hat in the strong wind during Hurricane Sally landfall in Mobile, Alabama, on September 16.Hide Caption 4 of 16Damaged boats are seen in the Palafox Pier Yacht harbor marina in Pensacola in the aftermath of Hurricane Sally on September 16.Damaged boats are seen in the Palafox Pier Yacht harbor marina in Pensacola in the aftermath of Hurricane Sally on September 16. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingDamaged boats are seen in the Palafox Pier Yacht harbor marina in Pensacola in the aftermath of Hurricane Sally on September 16.Hide Caption 5 of 16Trent Airhart wades through floodwaters in Pensacola, Florida, on September 16.Trent Airhart wades through floodwaters in Pensacola, Florida, on September 16. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingTrent Airhart wades through floodwaters in Pensacola, Florida, on September 16.Hide Caption 6 of 16The business of Joe and Teresa Mirable was damaged in Perdido Key, Florida.The business of Joe and Teresa Mirable was damaged in Perdido Key, Florida. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingThe business of Joe and Teresa Mirable was damaged in Perdido Key, Florida.Hide Caption 7 of 16Salvador Hurtado clears trees from a road in Silverhill, Alabama, on September 16.Salvador Hurtado clears trees from a road in Silverhill, Alabama, on September 16. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingSalvador Hurtado clears trees from a road in Silverhill, Alabama, on September 16.Hide Caption 8 of 16A Pensacola street is flooded on September 16.A Pensacola street is flooded on September 16. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingA Pensacola street is flooded on September 16.Hide Caption 9 of 16A boat is washed up near a road in Orange Beach, Alabama.A boat is washed up near a road in Orange Beach, Alabama. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingA boat is washed up near a road in Orange Beach, Alabama.Hide Caption 10 of 16Hurst Butts looks out from his business in Pensacola on September 16.Hurst Butts looks out from his business in Pensacola on September 16. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingHurst Butts looks out from his business in Pensacola on September 16.Hide Caption 11 of 16People use flashlights as they search for a vehicle in flooded Pensacola.People use flashlights as they search for a vehicle in flooded Pensacola. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingPeople use flashlights as they search for a vehicle in flooded Pensacola.Hide Caption 12 of 16Willie Berry loads sandbags on the back of his truck in Jackson, Mississippi, as he helps a friend prepare for Hurricane Sally on Tuesday, September 15.Willie Berry loads sandbags on the back of his truck in Jackson, Mississippi, as he helps a friend prepare for Hurricane Sally on Tuesday, September 15. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingWillie Berry loads sandbags on the back of his truck in Jackson, Mississippi, as he helps a friend prepare for Hurricane Sally on Tuesday, September 15.Hide Caption 13 of 16Water floods a road in Pascagoula, Mississippi, hours before Sally made landfall.Water floods a road in Pascagoula, Mississippi, hours before Sally made landfall. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingWater floods a road in Pascagoula, Mississippi, hours before Sally made landfall.Hide Caption 14 of 16Gas station attendants in Pass Christian, Mississippi, wrap pumps in plastic as Sally approached the coast on Monday, September 14.Gas station attendants in Pass Christian, Mississippi, wrap pumps in plastic as Sally approached the coast on Monday, September 14. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingGas station attendants in Pass Christian, Mississippi, wrap pumps in plastic as Sally approached the coast on Monday, September 14.Hide Caption 15 of 16This aerial photo, taken on September 14, shows boats and vehicles on the side of Route 46 in Shell Beach, Louisiana. People were putting them on higher ground before Sally hit.This aerial photo, taken on September 14, shows boats and vehicles on the side of Route 46 in Shell Beach, Louisiana. People were putting them on higher ground before Sally hit. Photos: Hurricane Sally causes widespread floodingThis aerial photo, taken on September 14, shows boats and vehicles on the side of Route 46 in Shell Beach, Louisiana. People were putting them on higher ground before Sally hit.Hide Caption 16 of 1612 hurricane sally 0916 RESTRICTED15 hurricane sally 091613 hurricane sally 091616 hurricane sally 091614 hurricane sally 091611 hurricane sally 091608 hurricane sally 0916 florida07 hurricane sally 0916 alabama RESTRICTED02 hurricane sally 0916 FLORIDA01 sally ORANGE BEACH AL 091601 sally PENSACOLA 091601 hurricane sally 0916 FLORIDA05 hurricane sally 091502 hurricane sally 0915 Mississippi08 hurricane sally 091406 hurricane sally 0914 Shell Beach LouisianaSally threatens Georgia and the CarolinasSally had weakened into a tropical depression by Wednesday night, but it was dumping large amounts of rain in parts of Georgia and the Carolinas on Thursday, and could unleash serious flooding there.Central Georgia could receive 6 to 12 inches of rain by storm’s end. Central and upstate South Carolina could get 3 to 10 inches, and parts of North Carolina and southeastern Virginia could receive 4 to 8 inches, the National Hurricane Center said.Flash flooding and river flooding are likely in many of these areas, forecasters said. “We have already seen significant flooding in portions of Alabama from this rain band. Please remember: Turn around, don’t drown,” the National Weather Service in Atlanta tweeted. A downed tree blocks a school bus and other traffic in Anderson County, South Carolina, following  rains on Thursday morning.A downed tree blocks a school bus and other traffic in Anderson County, South Carolina, following  rains on Thursday morning.A downed tree blocks a school bus and other traffic in Anderson County, South Carolina, following rains on Thursday morning.Curfew in Pensacola area for 3 nightsFlorida’s Escambia County, which includes Pensacola, asked residents to stay home so crews can evaluate roads and bridges. Local law enforcement will enforce the dusk to dawn curfew for three nights starting Wednesday. “We are still in an evaluation and lifesaving recovery mission, and we need to be able to do that job,” County Commissioner Robert Bender said. “We are still evaluating our roads and bridges to make sure that it is safe.”Crews rescued 377 people near the state’s border with Alabama and feared many more could be in danger in coming days, said Jason Rogers, the county’s public safety director. Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said Wednesday the danger is far from over, warning “pretty much any body of water in northwest Florida” could see a rise in levels over the next few days because of Sally. “There is going to be a lot of a lot of property damage,” he added. “When you see downtown Pensacola, you see 3 feet of water there, that’s going to affect probably every business that’s in downtown Pensacola — there’s just no two ways about it.” Alabama warned to remain vigilant Sally’s torrential rains led to historic and catastrophic flooding, the National Hurricane Center said. In Gulf Shores, near where the hurricane made landfall, Doris Stiers assessed the damage outside her beach home. She was stunned. A boat is washed up near a road after Hurricane Sally in Orange Beach, Alabama.A boat is washed up near a road after Hurricane Sally in Orange Beach, Alabama.A boat is washed up near a road after Hurricane Sally in Orange Beach, Alabama.”Looks like a war zone,” she told CNN. “Lots of destruction, homes destroyed, roofs gone. I have not had any service, power or internet. Bad night.”Wilson, the Orange Beach resident who rode out the storm at home, said it was terrifying. “Our house had windows blow out … and the whole house was shaking like a boat on the water. It was scary man, it really was,” Wilson told WPMI. “Our dock is obviously gone. Everything on the ground floor is gone.”Alabama officials warned that even if the storm has weakened, residents should not let their guard down.”The storm may have exited our local area, but it’s important to remain vigilant since many areas are still affected by lingering flood waters,” the National Weather Service in Mobile tweeted.

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