(CNN)Here is some background information about the Academy Awards, also known as the “Oscars.”

April 25, 2021 – The Annual Academy Awards are rescheduled for the first time in 40 years due to the coronavirus pandemic. The 93rd Academy Awards ceremony originally scheduled for February 28th are canceled, and the board of governors announce that the show will take place on April 25th.February 9, 2020 – The 92nd Annual Academy Awards ceremony airs.2020 Winners (selected)Best Picture”Parasite”Read MoreActor in a Leading RoleJoaquin Phoenix, “Joker”Actress in a Leading RoleRenée Zellweger, “Judy”Actress in a Supporting RoleLaura Dern, “Marriage Story”Actor in a Supporting RoleBrad Pitt, “Once upon a Time…in Hollywood”DirectorBong Joon-ho, “Parasite”The full list of winners2019 Winners (selected)Best Picture”Green Book”Actor in a Leading RoleRami Malek, “Bohemian Rhapsody”Actress in a Leading RoleOlivia Colman, “The Favourite”Actress in a supporting roleRegina King, “If Beale Street Could Talk”Actor in a supporting roleMahershala Ali, “Green Book”DirectorAlfonso Cuarón, “Roma”The complete list of winnersOscars' epic mistakeOscars' epic mistake Photos: Oscars' epic mistakeThe Oscars ceremony had a surprise ending that could only happen in Hollywood. Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty presented the award for best picture Sunday night.The Oscars ceremony had a surprise ending that could only happen in Hollywood. Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty presented the award for best picture Sunday night. Photos: Oscars' epic mistakeThe Oscars ceremony had a surprise ending that could only happen in Hollywood. Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty presented the award for best picture Sunday night.Hide Caption 1 of 11However, the envelope they carried was for the previous award, for actress in a leading role. Emma Stone of "La La Land" won that award, and Dunaway mistakenly read "La La Land" as the winner of best picture. It was actually "Moonlight." However, the envelope they carried was for the previous award, for actress in a leading role. Emma Stone of "La La Land" won that award, and Dunaway mistakenly read "La La Land" as the winner of best picture. It was actually "Moonlight." Photos: Oscars' epic mistakeHowever, the envelope they carried was for the previous award, for actress in a leading role. Emma Stone of “La La Land” won that award, and Dunaway mistakenly read “La La Land” as the winner of best picture. It was actually “Moonlight.” Hide Caption 2 of 11"La La Land" producer Jordan Horowitz, center, accepts the award for best picture next to producer Fred Berger."La La Land" producer Jordan Horowitz, center, accepts the award for best picture next to producer Fred Berger. Photos: Oscars' epic mistake”La La Land” producer Jordan Horowitz, center, accepts the award for best picture next to producer Fred Berger.Hide Caption 3 of 11Producers of "La La Land" give acceptance speeches before learning that their movie was not the real winner. Producers of "La La Land" give acceptance speeches before learning that their movie was not the real winner. Photos: Oscars' epic mistakeProducers of “La La Land” give acceptance speeches before learning that their movie was not the real winner. Hide Caption 4 of 11Horowitz, second from left, speaks to stage manager Gary Natoli, who had the envelope that showed "Moonlight" as the best picture.Horowitz, second from left, speaks to stage manager Gary Natoli, who had the envelope that showed "Moonlight" as the best picture. Photos: Oscars' epic mistakeHorowitz, second from left, speaks to stage manager Gary Natoli, who had the envelope that showed “Moonlight” as the best picture.Hide Caption 5 of 11Horowitz, lower left, stops the show to announce the actual best picture winner.Horowitz, lower left, stops the show to announce the actual best picture winner. Photos: Oscars' epic mistakeHorowitz, lower left, stops the show to announce the actual best picture winner.Hide Caption 6 of 11Horowitz, host Jimmy Kimmel and Beatty confer briefly after the mistake was made known.Horowitz, host Jimmy Kimmel and Beatty confer briefly after the mistake was made known. Photos: Oscars' epic mistakeHorowitz, host Jimmy Kimmel and Beatty confer briefly after the mistake was made known.Hide Caption 7 of 11Horowitz shows the correct card that says "Moonlight" won best picture.Horowitz shows the correct card that says "Moonlight" won best picture. Photos: Oscars' epic mistakeHorowitz shows the correct card that says “Moonlight” won best picture.Hide Caption 8 of 11The stunned audience reacts to the correction of the mistake.The stunned audience reacts to the correction of the mistake. Photos: Oscars' epic mistakeThe stunned audience reacts to the correction of the mistake.Hide Caption 9 of 11Kimmel speaks as the cast and crew of "Moonlight" celebrate winning best picture.Kimmel speaks as the cast and crew of "Moonlight" celebrate winning best picture. Photos: Oscars' epic mistakeKimmel speaks as the cast and crew of “Moonlight” celebrate winning best picture.Hide Caption 10 of 11"Moonlight" director Barry Jenkins accepts the best picture award."Moonlight" director Barry Jenkins accepts the best picture award. Photos: Oscars' epic mistake”Moonlight” director Barry Jenkins accepts the best picture award.Hide Caption 11 of 1103 Oscar best picture winner mistake 0227 RESTRICTED Oscars 2017 envelope HP04 Oscar best picture winner mistake 022705 Oscar best picture winner mistake 022706 Oscar best picture winner mistake 022707 Oscar best picture winner mistake 022710 Oscar best picture winner mistake 0227 RESTRICTEDOScars Moonlight card tightOscars 2017 best picture audience reaction RESTRICTED15 Oscar best picture winner mistake 0227 Moonlight OscarsOscar-winning best actorsOscar-winning best actors Photos: Oscar-winning best actors<strong>Emil Jannings (1929):</strong> The first best actor Oscar went to Emil Jannings at the academy's inaugural ceremony held in 1929. Jannings received the honors for two films: 1927's "The Way of All Flesh" and 1928's "The Last Command."<strong>Emil Jannings (1929):</strong> The first best actor Oscar went to Emil Jannings at the academy's inaugural ceremony held in 1929. Jannings received the honors for two films: 1927's "The Way of All Flesh" and 1928's "The Last Command." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsEmil Jannings (1929): The first best actor Oscar went to Emil Jannings at the academy’s inaugural ceremony held in 1929. Jannings received the honors for two films: 1927’s “The Way of All Flesh” and 1928’s “The Last Command.”Hide Caption 1 of 93<strong>Warner Baxter (1930):</strong> Warner Baxter, right, earned the best actor Oscar for his role as the Cisco Kid in "In Old Arizona" (1929). Baxter appears here with best actress winner Mary Pickford at the April 1930 awards ceremony, which recognized films made between August 1, 1928, and July 31, 1929. Baxter loved the role so much he reprised it twice more, in "The Cisco Kid" (1931) and again in "The Return of the Cisco Kid" (1939).<strong>Warner Baxter (1930):</strong> Warner Baxter, right, earned the best actor Oscar for his role as the Cisco Kid in "In Old Arizona" (1929). Baxter appears here with best actress winner Mary Pickford at the April 1930 awards ceremony, which recognized films made between August 1, 1928, and July 31, 1929. Baxter loved the role so much he reprised it twice more, in "The Cisco Kid" (1931) and again in "The Return of the Cisco Kid" (1939). Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsWarner Baxter (1930): Warner Baxter, right, earned the best actor Oscar for his role as the Cisco Kid in “In Old Arizona” (1929). Baxter appears here with best actress winner Mary Pickford at the April 1930 awards ceremony, which recognized films made between August 1, 1928, and July 31, 1929. Baxter loved the role so much he reprised it twice more, in “The Cisco Kid” (1931) and again in “The Return of the Cisco Kid” (1939).Hide Caption 2 of 93<strong>George Arliss (1930):</strong> George Arliss won the best actor Oscar for "Disraeli," apparently also beating himself since he was nominated for that film and "The Green Goddess." In the early years of the Oscar, a single nomination could recognize more than one role. However, for reasons not entirely clear, the actor won solely for "Disraeli." Perhaps it was a glitch on behalf of the academy, or perhaps voters truly preferred his portrayal as the famed British prime minister. The November 1930 awards ceremony recognized work from 1929 and 1930.<strong>George Arliss (1930):</strong> George Arliss won the best actor Oscar for "Disraeli," apparently also beating himself since he was nominated for that film and "The Green Goddess." In the early years of the Oscar, a single nomination could recognize more than one role. However, for reasons not entirely clear, the actor won solely for "Disraeli." Perhaps it was a glitch on behalf of the academy, or perhaps voters truly preferred his portrayal as the famed British prime minister. The November 1930 awards ceremony recognized work from 1929 and 1930. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsGeorge Arliss (1930): George Arliss won the best actor Oscar for “Disraeli,” apparently also beating himself since he was nominated for that film and “The Green Goddess.” In the early years of the Oscar, a single nomination could recognize more than one role. However, for reasons not entirely clear, the actor won solely for “Disraeli.” Perhaps it was a glitch on behalf of the academy, or perhaps voters truly preferred his portrayal as the famed British prime minister. The November 1930 awards ceremony recognized work from 1929 and 1930.Hide Caption 3 of 93<strong>Lionel Barrymore (1931):</strong> Lionel Barrymore, here with "Min and Bill" best actress winner Marie Dressler, won the best actor Oscar for his work in "A Free Soul." Barrymore played an alcoholic lawyer whose daughter gets involved with a mobster he helped go free. <strong>Lionel Barrymore (1931):</strong> Lionel Barrymore, here with "Min and Bill" best actress winner Marie Dressler, won the best actor Oscar for his work in "A Free Soul." Barrymore played an alcoholic lawyer whose daughter gets involved with a mobster he helped go free. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsLionel Barrymore (1931): Lionel Barrymore, here with “Min and Bill” best actress winner Marie Dressler, won the best actor Oscar for his work in “A Free Soul.” Barrymore played an alcoholic lawyer whose daughter gets involved with a mobster he helped go free. Hide Caption 4 of 93<strong>Wallace Beery (1932):</strong> The previous year's Oscar winner Lionel Barrymore, left, presents Wallace Beery, right, with the best actor Oscar for "The Champ." Beery tied that year with Fredric March in "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." <strong>Wallace Beery (1932):</strong> The previous year's Oscar winner Lionel Barrymore, left, presents Wallace Beery, right, with the best actor Oscar for "The Champ." Beery tied that year with Fredric March in "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsWallace Beery (1932): The previous year’s Oscar winner Lionel Barrymore, left, presents Wallace Beery, right, with the best actor Oscar for “The Champ.” Beery tied that year with Fredric March in “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.” Hide Caption 5 of 93<strong>Fredric March (1932):</strong> Fredric March, right, was honored the same year as Wallace Beery for "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." Beery actually received one less vote than March, which it resulted in a tie winner according to academy rules of the day. <strong>Fredric March (1932):</strong> Fredric March, right, was honored the same year as Wallace Beery for "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." Beery actually received one less vote than March, which it resulted in a tie winner according to academy rules of the day. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsFredric March (1932): Fredric March, right, was honored the same year as Wallace Beery for “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.” Beery actually received one less vote than March, which it resulted in a tie winner according to academy rules of the day. Hide Caption 6 of 93<strong>Charles Laughton (1934):</strong> British actor Charles Laughton won the best actor Oscar for the title role "The Private Life of Henry VIII" (1933), beating out  Leslie Howard in "Berkeley Square" (1933) and Paul Muni in "I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang" (1932). The sixth awards ceremony was held in March 1934 and recognized movies released from August 1, 1932, to December 31, 1933.<strong>Charles Laughton (1934):</strong> British actor Charles Laughton won the best actor Oscar for the title role "The Private Life of Henry VIII" (1933), beating out  Leslie Howard in "Berkeley Square" (1933) and Paul Muni in "I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang" (1932). The sixth awards ceremony was held in March 1934 and recognized movies released from August 1, 1932, to December 31, 1933. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsCharles Laughton (1934): British actor Charles Laughton won the best actor Oscar for the title role “The Private Life of Henry VIII” (1933), beating out Leslie Howard in “Berkeley Square” (1933) and Paul Muni in “I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang” (1932). The sixth awards ceremony was held in March 1934 and recognized movies released from August 1, 1932, to December 31, 1933.Hide Caption 7 of 93<strong>Clark Gable (1935):</strong> Clark Gable's status as a Hollywood icon was cemented when the box-office star won the best actor Oscar for Frank Capra's "It Happened One Night" (1934). The screwball comedy was a massive hit with academy voters at the February 1935 ceremony, sweeping the five big categories -- best picture, best director (Capra), best adapted screenplay and  best actress (Claudette Colbert). <strong>Clark Gable (1935):</strong> Clark Gable's status as a Hollywood icon was cemented when the box-office star won the best actor Oscar for Frank Capra's "It Happened One Night" (1934). The screwball comedy was a massive hit with academy voters at the February 1935 ceremony, sweeping the five big categories -- best picture, best director (Capra), best adapted screenplay and  best actress (Claudette Colbert). Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsClark Gable (1935): Clark Gable’s status as a Hollywood icon was cemented when the box-office star won the best actor Oscar for Frank Capra’s “It Happened One Night” (1934). The screwball comedy was a massive hit with academy voters at the February 1935 ceremony, sweeping the five big categories — best picture, best director (Capra), best adapted screenplay and best actress (Claudette Colbert). Hide Caption 8 of 93<strong>Victor McLaglen (1936):</strong> Victor McLaglen, left, beat out two earlier Oscar winners to claim the best actor prize for "The Informer." He was up against Charles Laughton and Clark Gable, both nominated for their roles in best picture winner "Mutiny on the Bounty." McLaglen appears with best actress winner Bette Davis and filmmaker D.W. Griffith of "The Birth of a Nation" fame at the March 1936 ceremony. <strong>Victor McLaglen (1936):</strong> Victor McLaglen, left, beat out two earlier Oscar winners to claim the best actor prize for "The Informer." He was up against Charles Laughton and Clark Gable, both nominated for their roles in best picture winner "Mutiny on the Bounty." McLaglen appears with best actress winner Bette Davis and filmmaker D.W. Griffith of "The Birth of a Nation" fame at the March 1936 ceremony. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsVictor McLaglen (1936): Victor McLaglen, left, beat out two earlier Oscar winners to claim the best actor prize for “The Informer.” He was up against Charles Laughton and Clark Gable, both nominated for their roles in best picture winner “Mutiny on the Bounty.” McLaglen appears with best actress winner Bette Davis and filmmaker D.W. Griffith of “The Birth of a Nation” fame at the March 1936 ceremony. Hide Caption 9 of 93<strong>Paul Muni (1937):</strong> After two earlier best actor nominations, Paul Muni finally won for the title role in "The Story of Louis Pasteur," the first of several biographical films he made at Warner Bros. <strong>Paul Muni (1937):</strong> After two earlier best actor nominations, Paul Muni finally won for the title role in "The Story of Louis Pasteur," the first of several biographical films he made at Warner Bros. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsPaul Muni (1937): After two earlier best actor nominations, Paul Muni finally won for the title role in “The Story of Louis Pasteur,” the first of several biographical films he made at Warner Bros. Hide Caption 10 of 93<strong>Spencer Tracy (1938):</strong> Spencer Tracy, left, with co-star Freddie Bartholomew, won his first best actor Oscar as a Portuguese fisherman in "Captains Courageous."  He beat out Oscar-winning actors Fredric March in "A Star Is Born" and Paul Muni in "The Life of Emile Zola."  It was Tracy's second nomination. <strong>Spencer Tracy (1938):</strong> Spencer Tracy, left, with co-star Freddie Bartholomew, won his first best actor Oscar as a Portuguese fisherman in "Captains Courageous."  He beat out Oscar-winning actors Fredric March in "A Star Is Born" and Paul Muni in "The Life of Emile Zola."  It was Tracy's second nomination. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsSpencer Tracy (1938): Spencer Tracy, left, with co-star Freddie Bartholomew, won his first best actor Oscar as a Portuguese fisherman in “Captains Courageous.” He beat out Oscar-winning actors Fredric March in “A Star Is Born” and Paul Muni in “The Life of Emile Zola.” It was Tracy’s second nomination. Hide Caption 11 of 93<strong>Spencer Tracy (1939):</strong> Spencer Tracy takes home his second best actor Oscar for "Boys Town." He appears here with Bette Davis, best actress for "Jezebel," at the ceremony held in 1939.<strong>Spencer Tracy (1939):</strong> Spencer Tracy takes home his second best actor Oscar for "Boys Town." He appears here with Bette Davis, best actress for "Jezebel," at the ceremony held in 1939. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsSpencer Tracy (1939): Spencer Tracy takes home his second best actor Oscar for “Boys Town.” He appears here with Bette Davis, best actress for “Jezebel,” at the ceremony held in 1939.Hide Caption 12 of 93<strong>Robert Donat (1940):</strong> Robert Donat's Oscar win for "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" was definitely a surprise. Donat earned the honors for his title role as a schoolteacher, beating out some strong performances, including Clark Gable in "Gone With the Wind," James Stewart in "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" and Laurence Olivier in "Wuthering Heights."<strong>Robert Donat (1940):</strong> Robert Donat's Oscar win for "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" was definitely a surprise. Donat earned the honors for his title role as a schoolteacher, beating out some strong performances, including Clark Gable in "Gone With the Wind," James Stewart in "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" and Laurence Olivier in "Wuthering Heights." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsRobert Donat (1940): Robert Donat’s Oscar win for “Goodbye, Mr. Chips” was definitely a surprise. Donat earned the honors for his title role as a schoolteacher, beating out some strong performances, including Clark Gable in “Gone With the Wind,” James Stewart in “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” and Laurence Olivier in “Wuthering Heights.”Hide Caption 13 of 93<strong>James Stewart (1941):</strong> After losing the Oscar a year earlier for his iconic role in "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," James Stewart received the award playing a reporter who falls for Katharine Hepburn in "The Philadelphia Story." Stewart and best actress winner Ginger Rogers celebrate their wins at the ceremony held in 1941.<strong>James Stewart (1941):</strong> After losing the Oscar a year earlier for his iconic role in "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," James Stewart received the award playing a reporter who falls for Katharine Hepburn in "The Philadelphia Story." Stewart and best actress winner Ginger Rogers celebrate their wins at the ceremony held in 1941. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsJames Stewart (1941): After losing the Oscar a year earlier for his iconic role in “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,” James Stewart received the award playing a reporter who falls for Katharine Hepburn in “The Philadelphia Story.” Stewart and best actress winner Ginger Rogers celebrate their wins at the ceremony held in 1941.Hide Caption 14 of 93<strong>Gary Cooper (1942):</strong> James Stewart, right, bestows pal Gary Cooper with the statuette for "Sergeant York." Cooper nabbed the win over Orson Welles, whose "Citizen Kane" also lost out on the best picture award but has become the epitome of a Hollywood classic. <strong>Gary Cooper (1942):</strong> James Stewart, right, bestows pal Gary Cooper with the statuette for "Sergeant York." Cooper nabbed the win over Orson Welles, whose "Citizen Kane" also lost out on the best picture award but has become the epitome of a Hollywood classic. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsGary Cooper (1942): James Stewart, right, bestows pal Gary Cooper with the statuette for “Sergeant York.” Cooper nabbed the win over Orson Welles, whose “Citizen Kane” also lost out on the best picture award but has become the epitome of a Hollywood classic. Hide Caption 15 of 93<strong>James Cagney (1943):</strong> Gary Cooper, right, congratulates James Cagney for his best actor win in "Yankee Doodle Dandy" at the Oscar ceremony held in 1943. Cooper, also a nominee for "The Pride of the Yankees," didn't seem to hold a grudge against Cagney. <strong>James Cagney (1943):</strong> Gary Cooper, right, congratulates James Cagney for his best actor win in "Yankee Doodle Dandy" at the Oscar ceremony held in 1943. Cooper, also a nominee for "The Pride of the Yankees," didn't seem to hold a grudge against Cagney. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsJames Cagney (1943): Gary Cooper, right, congratulates James Cagney for his best actor win in “Yankee Doodle Dandy” at the Oscar ceremony held in 1943. Cooper, also a nominee for “The Pride of the Yankees,” didn’t seem to hold a grudge against Cagney. Hide Caption 16 of 93<strong>Paul Lukas (1944):</strong> Character actor Paul Lukas faced stiff competition from stars Humphrey Bogart ("Casablanca") and Gary Cooper ("For Whom the Bell Tolls"), but he was able to take home the Oscar for "Watch on the Rhine." Lukas and best actress winner Jennifer Jones celebrate at the ceremony held in 1944. <strong>Paul Lukas (1944):</strong> Character actor Paul Lukas faced stiff competition from stars Humphrey Bogart ("Casablanca") and Gary Cooper ("For Whom the Bell Tolls"), but he was able to take home the Oscar for "Watch on the Rhine." Lukas and best actress winner Jennifer Jones celebrate at the ceremony held in 1944. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsPaul Lukas (1944): Character actor Paul Lukas faced stiff competition from stars Humphrey Bogart (“Casablanca”) and Gary Cooper (“For Whom the Bell Tolls”), but he was able to take home the Oscar for “Watch on the Rhine.” Lukas and best actress winner Jennifer Jones celebrate at the ceremony held in 1944. Hide Caption 17 of 93<strong>Bing Crosby (1945):</strong> Bing Crosby, right, and co-star Barry Fitzgerald find a reason to celebrate after the 1945 awards ceremony. They won the best actor and best supporting actor awards, respectively, for "Going My Way."<strong>Bing Crosby (1945):</strong> Bing Crosby, right, and co-star Barry Fitzgerald find a reason to celebrate after the 1945 awards ceremony. They won the best actor and best supporting actor awards, respectively, for "Going My Way." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsBing Crosby (1945): Bing Crosby, right, and co-star Barry Fitzgerald find a reason to celebrate after the 1945 awards ceremony. They won the best actor and best supporting actor awards, respectively, for “Going My Way.”Hide Caption 18 of 93<strong>Ray Milland (1946):</strong> Ray Milland had a prolific career for decades -- including a standout role in Alfred Hitchcock's "Dial M for Murder" -- but he received only one Oscar nomination. Luckily, he made it count, winning the best actor prize for his role as an alcoholic writer in "The Lost Weekend." Ingrid Bergman presents Milland with the prize at the 1946 ceremony.<strong>Ray Milland (1946):</strong> Ray Milland had a prolific career for decades -- including a standout role in Alfred Hitchcock's "Dial M for Murder" -- but he received only one Oscar nomination. Luckily, he made it count, winning the best actor prize for his role as an alcoholic writer in "The Lost Weekend." Ingrid Bergman presents Milland with the prize at the 1946 ceremony. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsRay Milland (1946): Ray Milland had a prolific career for decades — including a standout role in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Dial M for Murder” — but he received only one Oscar nomination. Luckily, he made it count, winning the best actor prize for his role as an alcoholic writer in “The Lost Weekend.” Ingrid Bergman presents Milland with the prize at the 1946 ceremony.Hide Caption 19 of 93<strong>Fredric March (1947):</strong> Fredric March, right, Dana Andrews, center, and Harold Russell struck a chord with postwar audiences as servicemen returning home in "The Best Years of Our Lives." March picked up his second Oscar for the role.<strong>Fredric March (1947):</strong> Fredric March, right, Dana Andrews, center, and Harold Russell struck a chord with postwar audiences as servicemen returning home in "The Best Years of Our Lives." March picked up his second Oscar for the role. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsFredric March (1947): Fredric March, right, Dana Andrews, center, and Harold Russell struck a chord with postwar audiences as servicemen returning home in “The Best Years of Our Lives.” March picked up his second Oscar for the role.Hide Caption 20 of 93<strong>Ronald Colman (1948):</strong> Ronald Colman, far right, a star since the silent days, picked up the best actor Oscar as a jealous actor in "A Double Life." Coleman appears with the year's other winners at the 1948 ceremony -- from left, Darryl Zanuck, producer of best picture "Gentleman's Agreement," best actress Loretta Young, best supporting actor Edmund Gwenn and best supporting actress Celeste Holm.<strong>Ronald Colman (1948):</strong> Ronald Colman, far right, a star since the silent days, picked up the best actor Oscar as a jealous actor in "A Double Life." Coleman appears with the year's other winners at the 1948 ceremony -- from left, Darryl Zanuck, producer of best picture "Gentleman's Agreement," best actress Loretta Young, best supporting actor Edmund Gwenn and best supporting actress Celeste Holm. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsRonald Colman (1948): Ronald Colman, far right, a star since the silent days, picked up the best actor Oscar as a jealous actor in “A Double Life.” Coleman appears with the year’s other winners at the 1948 ceremony — from left, Darryl Zanuck, producer of best picture “Gentleman’s Agreement,” best actress Loretta Young, best supporting actor Edmund Gwenn and best supporting actress Celeste Holm.Hide Caption 21 of 93<strong>Laurence Olivier (1949):</strong> Laurence Olivier's commitment to bringing Shakespeare's "Hamlet" to the screen paid off handsomely at the Oscars. Olivier walked away with the best actor Oscar in the title role, and "Hamlet" also won for best picture. Here Olivier appears with best actress winner Jane Wyman in 1949.<strong>Laurence Olivier (1949):</strong> Laurence Olivier's commitment to bringing Shakespeare's "Hamlet" to the screen paid off handsomely at the Oscars. Olivier walked away with the best actor Oscar in the title role, and "Hamlet" also won for best picture. Here Olivier appears with best actress winner Jane Wyman in 1949. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsLaurence Olivier (1949): Laurence Olivier’s commitment to bringing Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” to the screen paid off handsomely at the Oscars. Olivier walked away with the best actor Oscar in the title role, and “Hamlet” also won for best picture. Here Olivier appears with best actress winner Jane Wyman in 1949.Hide Caption 22 of 93<strong>Broderick Crawford (1950):</strong> Broderick Crawford, second from left, pushed past Kirk Douglas, Gregory Peck, Richard Todd and John Wayne to win the best actor Oscar with "All the King's Men." Crawford appears with best supporting actress winner Mercedes McCambridge, far left, best actress winner Olivia de Havilland and best supporting actor winner Dean Jagger at the 1950 ceremony.<strong>Broderick Crawford (1950):</strong> Broderick Crawford, second from left, pushed past Kirk Douglas, Gregory Peck, Richard Todd and John Wayne to win the best actor Oscar with "All the King's Men." Crawford appears with best supporting actress winner Mercedes McCambridge, far left, best actress winner Olivia de Havilland and best supporting actor winner Dean Jagger at the 1950 ceremony. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsBroderick Crawford (1950): Broderick Crawford, second from left, pushed past Kirk Douglas, Gregory Peck, Richard Todd and John Wayne to win the best actor Oscar with “All the King’s Men.” Crawford appears with best supporting actress winner Mercedes McCambridge, far left, best actress winner Olivia de Havilland and best supporting actor winner Dean Jagger at the 1950 ceremony.Hide Caption 23 of 93<strong>José Ferrer (1951):</strong> Puerto Rican-born José Ferrer became the first Hispanic to win an Oscar when he was named best actor for "Cyrano de Bergerac." Here he appears with Gloria Swanson, left, and Judy Holliday (best actress for "Born Yesterday") in 1951.<strong>José Ferrer (1951):</strong> Puerto Rican-born José Ferrer became the first Hispanic to win an Oscar when he was named best actor for "Cyrano de Bergerac." Here he appears with Gloria Swanson, left, and Judy Holliday (best actress for "Born Yesterday") in 1951. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsJosé Ferrer (1951): Puerto Rican-born José Ferrer became the first Hispanic to win an Oscar when he was named best actor for “Cyrano de Bergerac.” Here he appears with Gloria Swanson, left, and Judy Holliday (best actress for “Born Yesterday”) in 1951.Hide Caption 24 of 93<strong>Humphrey Bogart (1952):</strong> Claire Trevor can't resist giving Humphrey Bogart a kiss backstage at the 1952 Oscars ceremony after he won the best actor award for "The African Queen." Bogart beat out Marlon Brando in "A Streetcar Named Desire," Fredric March in "Death of a Salesman" and Montgomery Clift in "A Place in the Sun."<strong>Humphrey Bogart (1952):</strong> Claire Trevor can't resist giving Humphrey Bogart a kiss backstage at the 1952 Oscars ceremony after he won the best actor award for "The African Queen." Bogart beat out Marlon Brando in "A Streetcar Named Desire," Fredric March in "Death of a Salesman" and Montgomery Clift in "A Place in the Sun." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsHumphrey Bogart (1952): Claire Trevor can’t resist giving Humphrey Bogart a kiss backstage at the 1952 Oscars ceremony after he won the best actor award for “The African Queen.” Bogart beat out Marlon Brando in “A Streetcar Named Desire,” Fredric March in “Death of a Salesman” and Montgomery Clift in “A Place in the Sun.”Hide Caption 25 of 93<strong>Gary Cooper (1953):</strong> Gary Cooper won his second best actor award for the classic Western "High Noon" with Grace Kelly. Among Cooper's competitors were Kirk Douglas in "The Bad and the Beautiful," José Ferrer in "Moulin Rouge," Alec Guinness in "The Lavender Hill Mob" and Marlon Brando in "Viva Zapata!"<strong>Gary Cooper (1953):</strong> Gary Cooper won his second best actor award for the classic Western "High Noon" with Grace Kelly. Among Cooper's competitors were Kirk Douglas in "The Bad and the Beautiful," José Ferrer in "Moulin Rouge," Alec Guinness in "The Lavender Hill Mob" and Marlon Brando in "Viva Zapata!" Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsGary Cooper (1953): Gary Cooper won his second best actor award for the classic Western “High Noon” with Grace Kelly. Among Cooper’s competitors were Kirk Douglas in “The Bad and the Beautiful,” José Ferrer in “Moulin Rouge,” Alec Guinness in “The Lavender Hill Mob” and Marlon Brando in “Viva Zapata!”Hide Caption 26 of 93<strong>William Holden (1954):</strong> William Holden celebrates his best actor win for "Stalag 17" with best supporting actress winner Donna Reed at the Oscar ceremony in 1954. It was the actor's second nomination; his first was for Billy Wilder's 1950 classic "Sunset Boulevard."<strong>William Holden (1954):</strong> William Holden celebrates his best actor win for "Stalag 17" with best supporting actress winner Donna Reed at the Oscar ceremony in 1954. It was the actor's second nomination; his first was for Billy Wilder's 1950 classic "Sunset Boulevard." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsWilliam Holden (1954): William Holden celebrates his best actor win for “Stalag 17” with best supporting actress winner Donna Reed at the Oscar ceremony in 1954. It was the actor’s second nomination; his first was for Billy Wilder’s 1950 classic “Sunset Boulevard.”Hide Caption 27 of 93<strong>Marlon Brando (1955):</strong> Oscars host Bob Hope, right, might have tried, but there was no way Marlon Brando was parting with his best actor award at the 1955 ceremony. Brando had lost three years in a row before then, but the actor's luck finally changed with "On the Waterfront." <strong>Marlon Brando (1955):</strong> Oscars host Bob Hope, right, might have tried, but there was no way Marlon Brando was parting with his best actor award at the 1955 ceremony. Brando had lost three years in a row before then, but the actor's luck finally changed with "On the Waterfront." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsMarlon Brando (1955): Oscars host Bob Hope, right, might have tried, but there was no way Marlon Brando was parting with his best actor award at the 1955 ceremony. Brando had lost three years in a row before then, but the actor’s luck finally changed with “On the Waterfront.” Hide Caption 28 of 93<strong>Ernest Borgnine (1956):</strong> Ernest Borgnine faced heavy competition for best actor, beating out James Dean ("East of Eden"), Frank Sinatra ("The Man With the Golden Arm"), James Cagney ("Love Me or Leave Me") and Spencer Tracy ("Bad Day at Black Rock"). Backstage at the 1956 ceremony, Borgnine holds the Oscar for his portrayal of a lonely butcher in "Marty."<strong>Ernest Borgnine (1956):</strong> Ernest Borgnine faced heavy competition for best actor, beating out James Dean ("East of Eden"), Frank Sinatra ("The Man With the Golden Arm"), James Cagney ("Love Me or Leave Me") and Spencer Tracy ("Bad Day at Black Rock"). Backstage at the 1956 ceremony, Borgnine holds the Oscar for his portrayal of a lonely butcher in "Marty." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsErnest Borgnine (1956): Ernest Borgnine faced heavy competition for best actor, beating out James Dean (“East of Eden”), Frank Sinatra (“The Man With the Golden Arm”), James Cagney (“Love Me or Leave Me”) and Spencer Tracy (“Bad Day at Black Rock”). Backstage at the 1956 ceremony, Borgnine holds the Oscar for his portrayal of a lonely butcher in “Marty.”Hide Caption 29 of 93<strong>Yul Brynner (1957):</strong> Yul Brynner repeated his stage success as the King of Siam, winning the best actor Oscar for "The King and I." He's pictured at the 1957 ceremony. <strong>Yul Brynner (1957):</strong> Yul Brynner repeated his stage success as the King of Siam, winning the best actor Oscar for "The King and I." He's pictured at the 1957 ceremony. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsYul Brynner (1957): Yul Brynner repeated his stage success as the King of Siam, winning the best actor Oscar for “The King and I.” He’s pictured at the 1957 ceremony. Hide Caption 30 of 93<strong>Alec Guinness (1958):</strong> British actor Alec Guinness will always be known to "Star Wars" fans as Obi-Wan Kenobi, but he had an illustrious career on stage and screen long before the George Lucas blockbuster. After losing an earlier Oscar nomination, he finally won the best actor award as a World War II British officer in "The Bridge on the River Kwai."<strong>Alec Guinness (1958):</strong> British actor Alec Guinness will always be known to "Star Wars" fans as Obi-Wan Kenobi, but he had an illustrious career on stage and screen long before the George Lucas blockbuster. After losing an earlier Oscar nomination, he finally won the best actor award as a World War II British officer in "The Bridge on the River Kwai." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsAlec Guinness (1958): British actor Alec Guinness will always be known to “Star Wars” fans as Obi-Wan Kenobi, but he had an illustrious career on stage and screen long before the George Lucas blockbuster. After losing an earlier Oscar nomination, he finally won the best actor award as a World War II British officer in “The Bridge on the River Kwai.”Hide Caption 31 of 93<strong>David Niven (1959):</strong> David Niven, right, joins fellow Oscar winners Burl Ives and Susan Hayward at the 1959 ceremony after winning the best actor award for "Separate Tables." The actor fought off competition from Tony Curtis and Sidney Poitier, both up for "The Defiant Ones"; Paul Newman in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof"; and Spencer Tracy in "The Old Man and the Sea." <strong>David Niven (1959):</strong> David Niven, right, joins fellow Oscar winners Burl Ives and Susan Hayward at the 1959 ceremony after winning the best actor award for "Separate Tables." The actor fought off competition from Tony Curtis and Sidney Poitier, both up for "The Defiant Ones"; Paul Newman in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof"; and Spencer Tracy in "The Old Man and the Sea." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsDavid Niven (1959): David Niven, right, joins fellow Oscar winners Burl Ives and Susan Hayward at the 1959 ceremony after winning the best actor award for “Separate Tables.” The actor fought off competition from Tony Curtis and Sidney Poitier, both up for “The Defiant Ones”; Paul Newman in “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof”; and Spencer Tracy in “The Old Man and the Sea.” Hide Caption 32 of 93<strong>Charlton Heston (1960):</strong> Charlton Heston helped "Ben-Hur" to win a record 11 Academy Awards, shutting out Jack Lemmon, James Stewart, Paul Muni and Laurence Harvey as best actor. Heston appears with French actress Simone Signoret (best actress for "Room at the Top") at the 1960 ceremony.<strong>Charlton Heston (1960):</strong> Charlton Heston helped "Ben-Hur" to win a record 11 Academy Awards, shutting out Jack Lemmon, James Stewart, Paul Muni and Laurence Harvey as best actor. Heston appears with French actress Simone Signoret (best actress for "Room at the Top") at the 1960 ceremony. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsCharlton Heston (1960): Charlton Heston helped “Ben-Hur” to win a record 11 Academy Awards, shutting out Jack Lemmon, James Stewart, Paul Muni and Laurence Harvey as best actor. Heston appears with French actress Simone Signoret (best actress for “Room at the Top”) at the 1960 ceremony.Hide Caption 33 of 93<strong>Burt Lancaster (1961):</strong> Burt Lancaster was a winner two times over at the 1961 Oscar ceremony. He won the best actor prize for the title role in "Elmer Gantry," and he had glamorous Elizabeth Taylor, best actress winner for "Butterfield 8," by his side backstage.<strong>Burt Lancaster (1961):</strong> Burt Lancaster was a winner two times over at the 1961 Oscar ceremony. He won the best actor prize for the title role in "Elmer Gantry," and he had glamorous Elizabeth Taylor, best actress winner for "Butterfield 8," by his side backstage. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsBurt Lancaster (1961): Burt Lancaster was a winner two times over at the 1961 Oscar ceremony. He won the best actor prize for the title role in “Elmer Gantry,” and he had glamorous Elizabeth Taylor, best actress winner for “Butterfield 8,” by his side backstage.Hide Caption 34 of 93<strong>Maximilian Schell (1962):</strong> <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/01/showbiz/actor-maximilian-schell-dies/">Maximilian Schell</a> won the best actor Oscar over his "Judgment at Nuremberg" co-star Spencer Tracy. Schell had previously portrayed the character of German lawyer Hans Rolfe in a television version of "Judgment."<strong>Maximilian Schell (1962):</strong> <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/01/showbiz/actor-maximilian-schell-dies/">Maximilian Schell</a> won the best actor Oscar over his "Judgment at Nuremberg" co-star Spencer Tracy. Schell had previously portrayed the character of German lawyer Hans Rolfe in a television version of "Judgment." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsMaximilian Schell (1962): Maximilian Schell won the best actor Oscar over his “Judgment at Nuremberg” co-star Spencer Tracy. Schell had previously portrayed the character of German lawyer Hans Rolfe in a television version of “Judgment.”Hide Caption 35 of 93<strong>Gregory Peck (1963):</strong> Gregory Peck's performance as lawyer Atticus Finch in the film of Harper Lee's novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird," was a standout to academy voters. He beat out some stiff competition for best actor: Peter O'Toole for "Lawrence of Arabia" and Burt Lancaster for "Birdman of Alcatraz." Here Peck and his wife, Veronique, attend an Oscar after-party in 1963.<strong>Gregory Peck (1963):</strong> Gregory Peck's performance as lawyer Atticus Finch in the film of Harper Lee's novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird," was a standout to academy voters. He beat out some stiff competition for best actor: Peter O'Toole for "Lawrence of Arabia" and Burt Lancaster for "Birdman of Alcatraz." Here Peck and his wife, Veronique, attend an Oscar after-party in 1963. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsGregory Peck (1963): Gregory Peck’s performance as lawyer Atticus Finch in the film of Harper Lee’s novel, “To Kill a Mockingbird,” was a standout to academy voters. He beat out some stiff competition for best actor: Peter O’Toole for “Lawrence of Arabia” and Burt Lancaster for “Birdman of Alcatraz.” Here Peck and his wife, Veronique, attend an Oscar after-party in 1963.Hide Caption 36 of 93<strong>Sidney Poitier (1964):</strong> Sidney Poitier became the first African-American to win the best actor Oscar -- for his work in "Lilies of the Field." Poitier had been nominated once before for "The Defiant Ones." Interestingly, Poitier was the only one of the four acting category winners present at the 1964 ceremony. <strong>Sidney Poitier (1964):</strong> Sidney Poitier became the first African-American to win the best actor Oscar -- for his work in "Lilies of the Field." Poitier had been nominated once before for "The Defiant Ones." Interestingly, Poitier was the only one of the four acting category winners present at the 1964 ceremony. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsSidney Poitier (1964): Sidney Poitier became the first African-American to win the best actor Oscar — for his work in “Lilies of the Field.” Poitier had been nominated once before for “The Defiant Ones.” Interestingly, Poitier was the only one of the four acting category winners present at the 1964 ceremony. Hide Caption 37 of 93<strong>Rex Harrison (1965):</strong> Who didn't fall in love with "My Fair Lady"? The academy sure did. Rex Harrison took the best actor prize for his role as Henry Higgins at the 1965 ceremony, and the musical won best picture honors, among others. But Audrey Hepburn's performance has Eliza Doolittle wasn't even nominated -- the Oscar went to Julie Andrews for "Mary Poppins."<strong>Rex Harrison (1965):</strong> Who didn't fall in love with "My Fair Lady"? The academy sure did. Rex Harrison took the best actor prize for his role as Henry Higgins at the 1965 ceremony, and the musical won best picture honors, among others. But Audrey Hepburn's performance has Eliza Doolittle wasn't even nominated -- the Oscar went to Julie Andrews for "Mary Poppins." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsRex Harrison (1965): Who didn’t fall in love with “My Fair Lady”? The academy sure did. Rex Harrison took the best actor prize for his role as Henry Higgins at the 1965 ceremony, and the musical won best picture honors, among others. But Audrey Hepburn’s performance has Eliza Doolittle wasn’t even nominated — the Oscar went to Julie Andrews for “Mary Poppins.”Hide Caption 38 of 93<strong>Lee Marvin (1966):</strong> Lee Marvin won the Oscar for his comic role in "Cat Ballou" over dramatic heavyweights such as Laurence Olivier in "Othello," Richard Burton in "The Spy Who Came in From the Cold," Rod Steiger in "The Pawnbroker" and Oskar Werner in "Ship of Fools." Here, Marvin appears with then-girlfriend Michelle Triola in 1966.<strong>Lee Marvin (1966):</strong> Lee Marvin won the Oscar for his comic role in "Cat Ballou" over dramatic heavyweights such as Laurence Olivier in "Othello," Richard Burton in "The Spy Who Came in From the Cold," Rod Steiger in "The Pawnbroker" and Oskar Werner in "Ship of Fools." Here, Marvin appears with then-girlfriend Michelle Triola in 1966. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsLee Marvin (1966): Lee Marvin won the Oscar for his comic role in “Cat Ballou” over dramatic heavyweights such as Laurence Olivier in “Othello,” Richard Burton in “The Spy Who Came in From the Cold,” Rod Steiger in “The Pawnbroker” and Oskar Werner in “Ship of Fools.” Here, Marvin appears with then-girlfriend Michelle Triola in 1966.Hide Caption 39 of 93<strong>Paul Scofield (1967):</strong> Paul Scofield also was up against some heavyweight actors, particularly Richard Burton in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" But Scofield, here with Susannah York, won for his work as Thomas More in the period drama "A Man for All Seasons."<strong>Paul Scofield (1967):</strong> Paul Scofield also was up against some heavyweight actors, particularly Richard Burton in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" But Scofield, here with Susannah York, won for his work as Thomas More in the period drama "A Man for All Seasons." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsPaul Scofield (1967): Paul Scofield also was up against some heavyweight actors, particularly Richard Burton in “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” But Scofield, here with Susannah York, won for his work as Thomas More in the period drama “A Man for All Seasons.”Hide Caption 40 of 93<strong>Rod Steiger (1968):</strong> Sidney Poitier may have been the star of the detective drama "In the Heat of the Night," but he was snubbed in the Oscars race. It wasn't that academy voters didn't love the movie though: "In the Heat of the Night" won best picture as well as best actor for Poitier's co-star, Rod Steiger, here holding his Oscar at the 1968 ceremony.<strong>Rod Steiger (1968):</strong> Sidney Poitier may have been the star of the detective drama "In the Heat of the Night," but he was snubbed in the Oscars race. It wasn't that academy voters didn't love the movie though: "In the Heat of the Night" won best picture as well as best actor for Poitier's co-star, Rod Steiger, here holding his Oscar at the 1968 ceremony. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsRod Steiger (1968): Sidney Poitier may have been the star of the detective drama “In the Heat of the Night,” but he was snubbed in the Oscars race. It wasn’t that academy voters didn’t love the movie though: “In the Heat of the Night” won best picture as well as best actor for Poitier’s co-star, Rod Steiger, here holding his Oscar at the 1968 ceremony.Hide Caption 41 of 93<strong>Cliff Robertson (1969):</strong> Cliff Robertson's portrayal of a mentally challenged man in the drama "Charly" was enough to bowl over competition such as Peter O'Toole and Alan Arkin.<strong>Cliff Robertson (1969):</strong> Cliff Robertson's portrayal of a mentally challenged man in the drama "Charly" was enough to bowl over competition such as Peter O'Toole and Alan Arkin. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsCliff Robertson (1969): Cliff Robertson’s portrayal of a mentally challenged man in the drama “Charly” was enough to bowl over competition such as Peter O’Toole and Alan Arkin.Hide Caption 42 of 93<strong>John Wayne (1970):</strong> The best actor category was fierce the year John Wayne won the gold for "True Grit." In only his second nomination, the Hollywood legend beat out newcomers Dustin Hoffman and Jon Voight in "Midnight Cowboy" as well as Richard Burton in "Anne of the Thousand Days" and Peter O'Toole in "Goodbye, Mr. Chips." Barbra Streisand congratulates Wayne at the 1970 ceremony.<strong>John Wayne (1970):</strong> The best actor category was fierce the year John Wayne won the gold for "True Grit." In only his second nomination, the Hollywood legend beat out newcomers Dustin Hoffman and Jon Voight in "Midnight Cowboy" as well as Richard Burton in "Anne of the Thousand Days" and Peter O'Toole in "Goodbye, Mr. Chips." Barbra Streisand congratulates Wayne at the 1970 ceremony. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsJohn Wayne (1970): The best actor category was fierce the year John Wayne won the gold for “True Grit.” In only his second nomination, the Hollywood legend beat out newcomers Dustin Hoffman and Jon Voight in “Midnight Cowboy” as well as Richard Burton in “Anne of the Thousand Days” and Peter O’Toole in “Goodbye, Mr. Chips.” Barbra Streisand congratulates Wayne at the 1970 ceremony.Hide Caption 43 of 93<strong>George C. Scott (1971):</strong> "Patton" features one of the most readily recognizable images in films -- that of George C. Scott's general standing in front of the American flag -- and it was as critically acclaimed as it was popular. But while "Patton" nabbed the best picture title and a best actor Oscar for Scott, the actor was having none of it. He refused to accept the prize, <a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/obituaries/455563.stm" target="_blank">calling the politics</a> surrounding the ceremony "demeaning" and likening the Oscars to a "two-hour meat parade."<strong>George C. Scott (1971):</strong> "Patton" features one of the most readily recognizable images in films -- that of George C. Scott's general standing in front of the American flag -- and it was as critically acclaimed as it was popular. But while "Patton" nabbed the best picture title and a best actor Oscar for Scott, the actor was having none of it. He refused to accept the prize, <a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/obituaries/455563.stm" target="_blank">calling the politics</a> surrounding the ceremony "demeaning" and likening the Oscars to a "two-hour meat parade." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsGeorge C. Scott (1971): “Patton” features one of the most readily recognizable images in films — that of George C. Scott’s general standing in front of the American flag — and it was as critically acclaimed as it was popular. But while “Patton” nabbed the best picture title and a best actor Oscar for Scott, the actor was having none of it. He refused to accept the prize, calling the politics surrounding the ceremony “demeaning” and likening the Oscars to a “two-hour meat parade.”Hide Caption 44 of 93<strong>Gene Hackman (1972):</strong> Everyone wanted in on "The French Connection," and star Gene Hackman was rewarded handsomely with the best actor award at the 1972 ceremony. <strong>Gene Hackman (1972):</strong> Everyone wanted in on "The French Connection," and star Gene Hackman was rewarded handsomely with the best actor award at the 1972 ceremony. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsGene Hackman (1972): Everyone wanted in on “The French Connection,” and star Gene Hackman was rewarded handsomely with the best actor award at the 1972 ceremony. Hide Caption 45 of 93<strong>Marlon Brando (1973):</strong> An Oscar is an honor most stars would never refuse, but Marlon Brando did when the academy bestowed him with the best actor prize for "The Godfather" at the 1973 ceremony. Brando, who had won the award once before, said <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2QUacU0I4yU" target="_blank">he was protesting the portrayal of Native Americans</a> on TV and in film.<strong>Marlon Brando (1973):</strong> An Oscar is an honor most stars would never refuse, but Marlon Brando did when the academy bestowed him with the best actor prize for "The Godfather" at the 1973 ceremony. Brando, who had won the award once before, said <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2QUacU0I4yU" target="_blank">he was protesting the portrayal of Native Americans</a> on TV and in film. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsMarlon Brando (1973): An Oscar is an honor most stars would never refuse, but Marlon Brando did when the academy bestowed him with the best actor prize for “The Godfather” at the 1973 ceremony. Brando, who had won the award once before, said he was protesting the portrayal of Native Americans on TV and in film.Hide Caption 46 of 93<strong>Jack Lemmon (1974):</strong> The academy loved to nominate Jack Lemmon, but it wasn't always so quick to give him the prize. The star's luck changed when "Save the Tiger" earned him a best actor Oscar. <strong>Jack Lemmon (1974):</strong> The academy loved to nominate Jack Lemmon, but it wasn't always so quick to give him the prize. The star's luck changed when "Save the Tiger" earned him a best actor Oscar. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsJack Lemmon (1974): The academy loved to nominate Jack Lemmon, but it wasn’t always so quick to give him the prize. The star’s luck changed when “Save the Tiger” earned him a best actor Oscar. Hide Caption 47 of 93<strong>Art Carney (1975):</strong> For Art Carney, there were two phrases that helped him secure the best actor Oscar for "Harry and Tonto." "Do it! You are old," words of wisdom that came from his agent. <strong>Art Carney (1975):</strong> For Art Carney, there were two phrases that helped him secure the best actor Oscar for "Harry and Tonto." "Do it! You are old," words of wisdom that came from his agent. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsArt Carney (1975): For Art Carney, there were two phrases that helped him secure the best actor Oscar for “Harry and Tonto.” “Do it! You are old,” words of wisdom that came from his agent. Hide Caption 48 of 93<strong>Jack Nicholson (1976):</strong> After losing out four times as an Oscar nominee, Jack Nicholson triumphantly claimed his prize for "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest." <strong>Jack Nicholson (1976):</strong> After losing out four times as an Oscar nominee, Jack Nicholson triumphantly claimed his prize for "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsJack Nicholson (1976): After losing out four times as an Oscar nominee, Jack Nicholson triumphantly claimed his prize for “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” Hide Caption 49 of 93<strong>Peter Finch (1977):</strong> "Network's" Peter Finch faced some tough competition for the best actor award. He was up against Robert De Niro in "Taxi Driver" and Sylvester Stallone in best picture winner "Rocky" as well as his "Network" co-star, William Holden. Finch died two months before the March 1977 ceremony and became the first actor to win an Oscar posthumously.<strong>Peter Finch (1977):</strong> "Network's" Peter Finch faced some tough competition for the best actor award. He was up against Robert De Niro in "Taxi Driver" and Sylvester Stallone in best picture winner "Rocky" as well as his "Network" co-star, William Holden. Finch died two months before the March 1977 ceremony and became the first actor to win an Oscar posthumously. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsPeter Finch (1977): “Network’s” Peter Finch faced some tough competition for the best actor award. He was up against Robert De Niro in “Taxi Driver” and Sylvester Stallone in best picture winner “Rocky” as well as his “Network” co-star, William Holden. Finch died two months before the March 1977 ceremony and became the first actor to win an Oscar posthumously.Hide Caption 50 of 93<strong>Richard Dreyfuss (1978):</strong> John Travolta in "Saturday Night Fever" and Woody Allen in "Annie Hall" have become prime examples of characters in '70s films, but Richard Dreyfuss' performance as a struggling actor in "The Goodbye Girl" stood out the most to academy voters at the time. Here the actor accepts his prize at the 1978 ceremony.<strong>Richard Dreyfuss (1978):</strong> John Travolta in "Saturday Night Fever" and Woody Allen in "Annie Hall" have become prime examples of characters in '70s films, but Richard Dreyfuss' performance as a struggling actor in "The Goodbye Girl" stood out the most to academy voters at the time. Here the actor accepts his prize at the 1978 ceremony. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsRichard Dreyfuss (1978): John Travolta in “Saturday Night Fever” and Woody Allen in “Annie Hall” have become prime examples of characters in ’70s films, but Richard Dreyfuss’ performance as a struggling actor in “The Goodbye Girl” stood out the most to academy voters at the time. Here the actor accepts his prize at the 1978 ceremony.Hide Caption 51 of 93<strong>Jon Voight (1979):</strong> Jon Voight had been nominated for a best actor Oscar once before for 1969's "Midnight Cowboy," but it was the Vietnam War drama "Coming Home" that finally earned him the honors.<strong>Jon Voight (1979):</strong> Jon Voight had been nominated for a best actor Oscar once before for 1969's "Midnight Cowboy," but it was the Vietnam War drama "Coming Home" that finally earned him the honors. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsJon Voight (1979): Jon Voight had been nominated for a best actor Oscar once before for 1969’s “Midnight Cowboy,” but it was the Vietnam War drama “Coming Home” that finally earned him the honors.Hide Caption 52 of 93<strong>Dustin Hoffman (1980):</strong> Like Jack Nicholson before him, Dustin Hoffman was forever the bridesmaid and never the bride. But after losing for "Midnight Cowboy," "The Graduate" and "Lenny," Hoffman got to accept the award at the 1980 ceremony, thanks to his work in best picture winner "Kramer vs. Kramer."<strong>Dustin Hoffman (1980):</strong> Like Jack Nicholson before him, Dustin Hoffman was forever the bridesmaid and never the bride. But after losing for "Midnight Cowboy," "The Graduate" and "Lenny," Hoffman got to accept the award at the 1980 ceremony, thanks to his work in best picture winner "Kramer vs. Kramer." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsDustin Hoffman (1980): Like Jack Nicholson before him, Dustin Hoffman was forever the bridesmaid and never the bride. But after losing for “Midnight Cowboy,” “The Graduate” and “Lenny,” Hoffman got to accept the award at the 1980 ceremony, thanks to his work in best picture winner “Kramer vs. Kramer.”Hide Caption 53 of 93<strong>Robert De Niro (1981):</strong> Robert De Niro faced movie greats such as Peter O'Toole and Jack Lemmon in the best actor category. De Niro had already won the best supporting actor Oscar for "The Godfather: Part II," and academy voters couldn't help but hand him the best actor prize for "Raging Bull" -- especially since he gained nearly 60 pounds to play Jake LaMotta as an aging boxer. <strong>Robert De Niro (1981):</strong> Robert De Niro faced movie greats such as Peter O'Toole and Jack Lemmon in the best actor category. De Niro had already won the best supporting actor Oscar for "The Godfather: Part II," and academy voters couldn't help but hand him the best actor prize for "Raging Bull" -- especially since he gained nearly 60 pounds to play Jake LaMotta as an aging boxer. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsRobert De Niro (1981): Robert De Niro faced movie greats such as Peter O’Toole and Jack Lemmon in the best actor category. De Niro had already won the best supporting actor Oscar for “The Godfather: Part II,” and academy voters couldn’t help but hand him the best actor prize for “Raging Bull” — especially since he gained nearly 60 pounds to play Jake LaMotta as an aging boxer. Hide Caption 54 of 93<strong>Henry Fonda (1982):</strong> After being a movie legend for more than 40 years, Henry Fonda won his first competitive Oscar for "On Golden Pond." His co-star, Katharine Hepburn, also shined in the movie as his wife, picking up her fourth best actress prize. <strong>Henry Fonda (1982):</strong> After being a movie legend for more than 40 years, Henry Fonda won his first competitive Oscar for "On Golden Pond." His co-star, Katharine Hepburn, also shined in the movie as his wife, picking up her fourth best actress prize. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsHenry Fonda (1982): After being a movie legend for more than 40 years, Henry Fonda won his first competitive Oscar for “On Golden Pond.” His co-star, Katharine Hepburn, also shined in the movie as his wife, picking up her fourth best actress prize. Hide Caption 55 of 93<strong>Ben Kingsley (1983):</strong> Ben Kingsley's portrayal in "Gandhi" was the performance to beat in that year's best actor Oscar race, and neither Dustin Hoffman in "Tootsie" nor Paul Newman in "The Verdict" could compete. <strong>Ben Kingsley (1983):</strong> Ben Kingsley's portrayal in "Gandhi" was the performance to beat in that year's best actor Oscar race, and neither Dustin Hoffman in "Tootsie" nor Paul Newman in "The Verdict" could compete. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsBen Kingsley (1983): Ben Kingsley’s portrayal in “Gandhi” was the performance to beat in that year’s best actor Oscar race, and neither Dustin Hoffman in “Tootsie” nor Paul Newman in “The Verdict” could compete. Hide Caption 56 of 93<strong>Robert Duvall (1984):</strong> Robert Duvall won the best actor prize for his performance as a country singer in "Tender Mercies."<strong>Robert Duvall (1984):</strong> Robert Duvall won the best actor prize for his performance as a country singer in "Tender Mercies." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsRobert Duvall (1984): Robert Duvall won the best actor prize for his performance as a country singer in “Tender Mercies.”Hide Caption 57 of 93<strong>F. Murray Abraham (1985):</strong> F. Murray Abraham's performance as Salieri in "Amadeus" rocked academy voters, who named him best actor.<strong>F. Murray Abraham (1985):</strong> F. Murray Abraham's performance as Salieri in "Amadeus" rocked academy voters, who named him best actor. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsF. Murray Abraham (1985): F. Murray Abraham’s performance as Salieri in “Amadeus” rocked academy voters, who named him best actor.Hide Caption 58 of 93<strong>William Hurt (1986):</strong> "Out of Africa" dominated the Oscars at the 1986 ceremony, but William Hurt picked up the best actor award for his portrayal of a gay imprisoned man in "Kiss of the Spider Woman."<strong>William Hurt (1986):</strong> "Out of Africa" dominated the Oscars at the 1986 ceremony, but William Hurt picked up the best actor award for his portrayal of a gay imprisoned man in "Kiss of the Spider Woman." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsWilliam Hurt (1986): “Out of Africa” dominated the Oscars at the 1986 ceremony, but William Hurt picked up the best actor award for his portrayal of a gay imprisoned man in “Kiss of the Spider Woman.”Hide Caption 59 of 93<strong>Paul Newman (1987):</strong> Paul Newman's performance in "The Color of Money" struck Oscar gold. It was the actor's first competitive Oscar win, but he wasn't there to accept it -- he'd joked that, after showing up and losing six other times, he might finally nab the prize if he stayed away. <strong>Paul Newman (1987):</strong> Paul Newman's performance in "The Color of Money" struck Oscar gold. It was the actor's first competitive Oscar win, but he wasn't there to accept it -- he'd joked that, after showing up and losing six other times, he might finally nab the prize if he stayed away. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsPaul Newman (1987): Paul Newman’s performance in “The Color of Money” struck Oscar gold. It was the actor’s first competitive Oscar win, but he wasn’t there to accept it — he’d joked that, after showing up and losing six other times, he might finally nab the prize if he stayed away. Hide Caption 60 of 93<strong>Michael Douglas (1988):</strong> Gordon Gekko's creed of greed was very, very good to Michael Douglas. The star -- and son of another frequent Oscar nominee, Kirk Douglas -- earned his first Oscar nomination and first win for best actor for his role as the ruthless corporate raider in "Wall Street." Here Douglas appears with Marlee Matlin at the 1988 ceremony.<strong>Michael Douglas (1988):</strong> Gordon Gekko's creed of greed was very, very good to Michael Douglas. The star -- and son of another frequent Oscar nominee, Kirk Douglas -- earned his first Oscar nomination and first win for best actor for his role as the ruthless corporate raider in "Wall Street." Here Douglas appears with Marlee Matlin at the 1988 ceremony. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsMichael Douglas (1988): Gordon Gekko’s creed of greed was very, very good to Michael Douglas. The star — and son of another frequent Oscar nominee, Kirk Douglas — earned his first Oscar nomination and first win for best actor for his role as the ruthless corporate raider in “Wall Street.” Here Douglas appears with Marlee Matlin at the 1988 ceremony.Hide Caption 61 of 93<strong>Dustin Hoffman (1989):</strong> Awards came pouring in for "Rain Man" with Dustin Hoffman, left, as an autistic savant and Tom Cruise as his younger brother. Hoffman picked up his second best actor Oscar and received congratulations from Cruise at the 1989 ceremony. Cruise wasn't even nominated, but he was probably just fine with starring in the best picture winner.<strong>Dustin Hoffman (1989):</strong> Awards came pouring in for "Rain Man" with Dustin Hoffman, left, as an autistic savant and Tom Cruise as his younger brother. Hoffman picked up his second best actor Oscar and received congratulations from Cruise at the 1989 ceremony. Cruise wasn't even nominated, but he was probably just fine with starring in the best picture winner. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsDustin Hoffman (1989): Awards came pouring in for “Rain Man” with Dustin Hoffman, left, as an autistic savant and Tom Cruise as his younger brother. Hoffman picked up his second best actor Oscar and received congratulations from Cruise at the 1989 ceremony. Cruise wasn’t even nominated, but he was probably just fine with starring in the best picture winner.Hide Caption 62 of 93<strong>Daniel Day-Lewis (1990):</strong> Before Daniel Day-Lewis became so revered he could strike fear in the hearts of Oscar competitors, the British performer proved his mettle with the biopic "My Left Foot," earning his first best actor Oscar. It was no easy task: Day-Lewis was up against Morgan Freeman in "Driving Miss Daisy," Kenneth Branagh in "Henry V," Tom Cruise in "Born on the Fourth of July" and Robin Williams in "Dead Poets Society."<strong>Daniel Day-Lewis (1990):</strong> Before Daniel Day-Lewis became so revered he could strike fear in the hearts of Oscar competitors, the British performer proved his mettle with the biopic "My Left Foot," earning his first best actor Oscar. It was no easy task: Day-Lewis was up against Morgan Freeman in "Driving Miss Daisy," Kenneth Branagh in "Henry V," Tom Cruise in "Born on the Fourth of July" and Robin Williams in "Dead Poets Society." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsDaniel Day-Lewis (1990): Before Daniel Day-Lewis became so revered he could strike fear in the hearts of Oscar competitors, the British performer proved his mettle with the biopic “My Left Foot,” earning his first best actor Oscar. It was no easy task: Day-Lewis was up against Morgan Freeman in “Driving Miss Daisy,” Kenneth Branagh in “Henry V,” Tom Cruise in “Born on the Fourth of July” and Robin Williams in “Dead Poets Society.”Hide Caption 63 of 93<strong>Jeremy Irons (1991):</strong> We suppose the academy couldn't justify giving Kevin Costner the best director, best picture <em>and </em>the best actor prize for "Dances With Wolves," so Jeremy Irons took home the statuette for best actor for his role as Claus von Bülow in "Reversal of Fortune."<strong>Jeremy Irons (1991):</strong> We suppose the academy couldn't justify giving Kevin Costner the best director, best picture <em>and </em>the best actor prize for "Dances With Wolves," so Jeremy Irons took home the statuette for best actor for his role as Claus von Bülow in "Reversal of Fortune." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsJeremy Irons (1991): We suppose the academy couldn’t justify giving Kevin Costner the best director, best picture and the best actor prize for “Dances With Wolves,” so Jeremy Irons took home the statuette for best actor for his role as Claus von Bülow in “Reversal of Fortune.”Hide Caption 64 of 93<strong>Anthony Hopkins (1992):</strong> Anthony Hopkins absolutely killed as Hannibal Lecter in "The Silence of the Lambs," so it wasn't surprising that he secured the best actor Oscar for the role.<strong>Anthony Hopkins (1992):</strong> Anthony Hopkins absolutely killed as Hannibal Lecter in "The Silence of the Lambs," so it wasn't surprising that he secured the best actor Oscar for the role. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsAnthony Hopkins (1992): Anthony Hopkins absolutely killed as Hannibal Lecter in “The Silence of the Lambs,” so it wasn’t surprising that he secured the best actor Oscar for the role.Hide Caption 65 of 93<strong>Al Pacino (1993):</strong> Before "Scent of a Woman," Al Pacino had been nominated for best actor four times and best supporting actor twice without winning. But the star's moment to accept the best actor Oscar finally came at the 1993 ceremony. Pacino may have won for "Scent of a Woman," but he also lost that year in the best supporting actor category for "Glengarry Glen Ross."<strong>Al Pacino (1993):</strong> Before "Scent of a Woman," Al Pacino had been nominated for best actor four times and best supporting actor twice without winning. But the star's moment to accept the best actor Oscar finally came at the 1993 ceremony. Pacino may have won for "Scent of a Woman," but he also lost that year in the best supporting actor category for "Glengarry Glen Ross." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsAl Pacino (1993): Before “Scent of a Woman,” Al Pacino had been nominated for best actor four times and best supporting actor twice without winning. But the star’s moment to accept the best actor Oscar finally came at the 1993 ceremony. Pacino may have won for “Scent of a Woman,” but he also lost that year in the best supporting actor category for “Glengarry Glen Ross.”Hide Caption 66 of 93<strong>Tom Hanks (1994):</strong> Little did anyone know that when Tom Hanks won the best actor Oscar for the legal drama "Philadelphia" he'd be back at the Oscars very soon, and in a very different role. <strong>Tom Hanks (1994):</strong> Little did anyone know that when Tom Hanks won the best actor Oscar for the legal drama "Philadelphia" he'd be back at the Oscars very soon, and in a very different role. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsTom Hanks (1994): Little did anyone know that when Tom Hanks won the best actor Oscar for the legal drama “Philadelphia” he’d be back at the Oscars very soon, and in a very different role. Hide Caption 67 of 93<strong>Tom Hanks (1995):</strong> Tom Hanks proved his versatility when he won the best actor Oscar for the second year in a row. His prize this time was for his performance as the mentally challenged but indefatigable "Forrest Gump."<strong>Tom Hanks (1995):</strong> Tom Hanks proved his versatility when he won the best actor Oscar for the second year in a row. His prize this time was for his performance as the mentally challenged but indefatigable "Forrest Gump." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsTom Hanks (1995): Tom Hanks proved his versatility when he won the best actor Oscar for the second year in a row. His prize this time was for his performance as the mentally challenged but indefatigable “Forrest Gump.”Hide Caption 68 of 93<strong>Nicolas Cage (1996):</strong> Nicolas Cage may now be the butt of Internet jokes -- <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0Og4LaB1Zc" target="_blank">surely you've seen him swing from a "Wrecking Ball"</a>? -- but he was the man to beat at the 1996 Oscar ceremony. Cage won the best actor prize for "Leaving Las Vegas," his first nomination and first win.<strong>Nicolas Cage (1996):</strong> Nicolas Cage may now be the butt of Internet jokes -- <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U0Og4LaB1Zc" target="_blank">surely you've seen him swing from a "Wrecking Ball"</a>? -- but he was the man to beat at the 1996 Oscar ceremony. Cage won the best actor prize for "Leaving Las Vegas," his first nomination and first win. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsNicolas Cage (1996): Nicolas Cage may now be the butt of Internet jokes — surely you’ve seen him swing from a “Wrecking Ball”? — but he was the man to beat at the 1996 Oscar ceremony. Cage won the best actor prize for “Leaving Las Vegas,” his first nomination and first win.Hide Caption 69 of 93<strong>Geoffrey Rush (1997):</strong> Some actors languish as nominees for years before winning an Oscar, but Geoffrey Rush won the best actor prize on his first try with "Shine." <strong>Geoffrey Rush (1997):</strong> Some actors languish as nominees for years before winning an Oscar, but Geoffrey Rush won the best actor prize on his first try with "Shine." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsGeoffrey Rush (1997): Some actors languish as nominees for years before winning an Oscar, but Geoffrey Rush won the best actor prize on his first try with “Shine.” Hide Caption 70 of 93<strong>Jack Nicholson (1998):</strong> By now, everyone knew what a powerhouse Jack Nicholson was, but he reminded moviegoers again with "As Good as It Gets," picking up yet another best actor Oscar.<strong>Jack Nicholson (1998):</strong> By now, everyone knew what a powerhouse Jack Nicholson was, but he reminded moviegoers again with "As Good as It Gets," picking up yet another best actor Oscar. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsJack Nicholson (1998): By now, everyone knew what a powerhouse Jack Nicholson was, but he reminded moviegoers again with “As Good as It Gets,” picking up yet another best actor Oscar.Hide Caption 71 of 93<strong>Roberto Benigni (1999):</strong> Italian actor Roberto Benigni was unknown to American audiences before "Life Is Beautiful," but he stole the show at the 1999 Oscars ceremony. The academy gave him the best actor Oscar for "Life Is Beautiful," which also won the prize for best foreign-language film. <strong>Roberto Benigni (1999):</strong> Italian actor Roberto Benigni was unknown to American audiences before "Life Is Beautiful," but he stole the show at the 1999 Oscars ceremony. The academy gave him the best actor Oscar for "Life Is Beautiful," which also won the prize for best foreign-language film. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsRoberto Benigni (1999): Italian actor Roberto Benigni was unknown to American audiences before “Life Is Beautiful,” but he stole the show at the 1999 Oscars ceremony. The academy gave him the best actor Oscar for “Life Is Beautiful,” which also won the prize for best foreign-language film. Hide Caption 72 of 93<strong>Kevin Spacey (2000):</strong> "American Beauty" was a cynical look at American middle class life with a new century arriving. Star Kevin Spacey received the best actor award for his portrayal of a middle-aged man who lusts after his teenage daughter's friend. The film also won best picture, director (Sam Mendes) and original screenplay (Alan Ball).<strong>Kevin Spacey (2000):</strong> "American Beauty" was a cynical look at American middle class life with a new century arriving. Star Kevin Spacey received the best actor award for his portrayal of a middle-aged man who lusts after his teenage daughter's friend. The film also won best picture, director (Sam Mendes) and original screenplay (Alan Ball). Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsKevin Spacey (2000): “American Beauty” was a cynical look at American middle class life with a new century arriving. Star Kevin Spacey received the best actor award for his portrayal of a middle-aged man who lusts after his teenage daughter’s friend. The film also won best picture, director (Sam Mendes) and original screenplay (Alan Ball).Hide Caption 73 of 93<strong>Russell Crowe (2001):</strong> The academy fawned over Russell Crowe's "Gladiator," a sword and sandals epic that picked up honors for best picture, best costume design, best sound, best visual effects and best actor -- the first win for the Australian Crowe. <strong>Russell Crowe (2001):</strong> The academy fawned over Russell Crowe's "Gladiator," a sword and sandals epic that picked up honors for best picture, best costume design, best sound, best visual effects and best actor -- the first win for the Australian Crowe. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsRussell Crowe (2001): The academy fawned over Russell Crowe’s “Gladiator,” a sword and sandals epic that picked up honors for best picture, best costume design, best sound, best visual effects and best actor — the first win for the Australian Crowe. Hide Caption 74 of 93<strong>Denzel Washington (2002):</strong> Denzel Washington has a reputation as a nice guy in Hollywood, so his transformation into the monstrous detective Alonzo in "Training Day" was incredible to watch. After already winning a best supporting actor statuette for "Glory," Washington took home the best actor award for "Training Day," making him the first African-American to win both. <strong>Denzel Washington (2002):</strong> Denzel Washington has a reputation as a nice guy in Hollywood, so his transformation into the monstrous detective Alonzo in "Training Day" was incredible to watch. After already winning a best supporting actor statuette for "Glory," Washington took home the best actor award for "Training Day," making him the first African-American to win both. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsDenzel Washington (2002): Denzel Washington has a reputation as a nice guy in Hollywood, so his transformation into the monstrous detective Alonzo in “Training Day” was incredible to watch. After already winning a best supporting actor statuette for “Glory,” Washington took home the best actor award for “Training Day,” making him the first African-American to win both. Hide Caption 75 of 93<strong>Adrien Brody (2003):</strong> Adrien Brody appeared so thrilled when he won best actor award for "The Pianist" he even got Oscar presenter Halle Berry caught up in the moment with a passionate kiss at the 2003 ceremony. "I bet they didn't tell you that was in the gift bag," he joked when he finished. It was his first nomination and win. <strong>Adrien Brody (2003):</strong> Adrien Brody appeared so thrilled when he won best actor award for "The Pianist" he even got Oscar presenter Halle Berry caught up in the moment with a passionate kiss at the 2003 ceremony. "I bet they didn't tell you that was in the gift bag," he joked when he finished. It was his first nomination and win. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsAdrien Brody (2003): Adrien Brody appeared so thrilled when he won best actor award for “The Pianist” he even got Oscar presenter Halle Berry caught up in the moment with a passionate kiss at the 2003 ceremony. “I bet they didn’t tell you that was in the gift bag,” he joked when he finished. It was his first nomination and win. Hide Caption 76 of 93<strong>Sean Penn (2004):</strong> The Oscar race for best actor was a tough one when Sean Penn faced off with Jude Law for "Cold Mountain" and Bill Murray for "Lost in Translation," among others. In the end, it was Penn's work in "Mystic River" that earned him his first Academy Award.<strong>Sean Penn (2004):</strong> The Oscar race for best actor was a tough one when Sean Penn faced off with Jude Law for "Cold Mountain" and Bill Murray for "Lost in Translation," among others. In the end, it was Penn's work in "Mystic River" that earned him his first Academy Award. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsSean Penn (2004): The Oscar race for best actor was a tough one when Sean Penn faced off with Jude Law for “Cold Mountain” and Bill Murray for “Lost in Translation,” among others. In the end, it was Penn’s work in “Mystic River” that earned him his first Academy Award.Hide Caption 77 of 93<strong>Jamie Foxx (2005):</strong> Before "Ray," Jamie Foxx was known primarily as a comedian -- the kind who would star in a popcorn flick like "Booty Call." But after his portrayal of singer Ray Charles in a musical biography, people realized he had been underestimated as an actor. The academy started paying attention, too, and gave Foxx two nominations for the 2005 ceremony: one for best actor for "Ray" and another for best supporting actor for "Collateral." He didn't win in the best supporting category, but we bet he's been able to live with that loss. <strong>Jamie Foxx (2005):</strong> Before "Ray," Jamie Foxx was known primarily as a comedian -- the kind who would star in a popcorn flick like "Booty Call." But after his portrayal of singer Ray Charles in a musical biography, people realized he had been underestimated as an actor. The academy started paying attention, too, and gave Foxx two nominations for the 2005 ceremony: one for best actor for "Ray" and another for best supporting actor for "Collateral." He didn't win in the best supporting category, but we bet he's been able to live with that loss. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsJamie Foxx (2005): Before “Ray,” Jamie Foxx was known primarily as a comedian — the kind who would star in a popcorn flick like “Booty Call.” But after his portrayal of singer Ray Charles in a musical biography, people realized he had been underestimated as an actor. The academy started paying attention, too, and gave Foxx two nominations for the 2005 ceremony: one for best actor for “Ray” and another for best supporting actor for “Collateral.” He didn’t win in the best supporting category, but we bet he’s been able to live with that loss. Hide Caption 78 of 93<strong>Philip Seymour Hoffman (2006):</strong> <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/02/showbiz/philip-seymour-hoffman-appreciation/">Philip Seymour Hoffman</a>'s portrayal of writer Truman Capote in "Capote" was the kind of rock-solid immersion audiences had come to expect from the actor. He got his due with the best actor award -- his only Oscar. <strong>Philip Seymour Hoffman (2006):</strong> <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/02/showbiz/philip-seymour-hoffman-appreciation/">Philip Seymour Hoffman</a>'s portrayal of writer Truman Capote in "Capote" was the kind of rock-solid immersion audiences had come to expect from the actor. He got his due with the best actor award -- his only Oscar. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsPhilip Seymour Hoffman (2006): Philip Seymour Hoffman‘s portrayal of writer Truman Capote in “Capote” was the kind of rock-solid immersion audiences had come to expect from the actor. He got his due with the best actor award — his only Oscar. Hide Caption 79 of 93<strong>Forest Whitaker (2007):</strong> Until "The Last King of Scotland," Forest Whitaker had been completely overlooked by the academy. But after he turned in a masterful portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin, academy voters handed him the Oscar.<strong>Forest Whitaker (2007):</strong> Until "The Last King of Scotland," Forest Whitaker had been completely overlooked by the academy. But after he turned in a masterful portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin, academy voters handed him the Oscar. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsForest Whitaker (2007): Until “The Last King of Scotland,” Forest Whitaker had been completely overlooked by the academy. But after he turned in a masterful portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin, academy voters handed him the Oscar.Hide Caption 80 of 93<strong>Daniel Day-Lewis (2008):</strong> If Daniel Day-Lewis is in the running, chances are there will be an award for him. The actor won his second best actor Oscar for "There Will Be Blood." He receives the award from Helen Mirren at the 2008 ceremony.<strong>Daniel Day-Lewis (2008):</strong> If Daniel Day-Lewis is in the running, chances are there will be an award for him. The actor won his second best actor Oscar for "There Will Be Blood." He receives the award from Helen Mirren at the 2008 ceremony. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsDaniel Day-Lewis (2008): If Daniel Day-Lewis is in the running, chances are there will be an award for him. The actor won his second best actor Oscar for “There Will Be Blood.” He receives the award from Helen Mirren at the 2008 ceremony.Hide Caption 81 of 93<strong>Sean Penn (2009):</strong> Sean Penn, here with best actress Kate Winslet, left, and best supporting actress Penelope Cruz, gave the performance of a lifetime as openly gay politician and activist Harvey Milk in "Milk." The academy rewarded Penn with his second best actor Oscar at the 2009 ceremony. <strong>Sean Penn (2009):</strong> Sean Penn, here with best actress Kate Winslet, left, and best supporting actress Penelope Cruz, gave the performance of a lifetime as openly gay politician and activist Harvey Milk in "Milk." The academy rewarded Penn with his second best actor Oscar at the 2009 ceremony. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsSean Penn (2009): Sean Penn, here with best actress Kate Winslet, left, and best supporting actress Penelope Cruz, gave the performance of a lifetime as openly gay politician and activist Harvey Milk in “Milk.” The academy rewarded Penn with his second best actor Oscar at the 2009 ceremony. Hide Caption 82 of 93<strong>Jeff Bridges (2010):</strong> Jeff Bridges was understandably ecstatic when he won the best actor Oscar for "Crazy Heart." Bridges had been nominated four times before, and, with competition from George Clooney in "Up in the Air" and Jeremy Renner in "The Hurt Locker," his wasn't an obvious win. So when his name was called at the 2010 ceremony, <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2010/SHOWBIZ/Movies/03/07/">Bridges relished the moment in his acceptance speech</a>: "Thank you, mom and dad, for turning me on to such a groovy profession," he said.<strong>Jeff Bridges (2010):</strong> Jeff Bridges was understandably ecstatic when he won the best actor Oscar for "Crazy Heart." Bridges had been nominated four times before, and, with competition from George Clooney in "Up in the Air" and Jeremy Renner in "The Hurt Locker," his wasn't an obvious win. So when his name was called at the 2010 ceremony, <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2010/SHOWBIZ/Movies/03/07/">Bridges relished the moment in his acceptance speech</a>: "Thank you, mom and dad, for turning me on to such a groovy profession," he said. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsJeff Bridges (2010): Jeff Bridges was understandably ecstatic when he won the best actor Oscar for “Crazy Heart.” Bridges had been nominated four times before, and, with competition from George Clooney in “Up in the Air” and Jeremy Renner in “The Hurt Locker,” his wasn’t an obvious win. So when his name was called at the 2010 ceremony, Bridges relished the moment in his acceptance speech: “Thank you, mom and dad, for turning me on to such a groovy profession,” he said.Hide Caption 83 of 93<strong>Colin Firth (2011):</strong> Colin Firth's portrayal of King George VI's fight to overcome a speech impediment beat out Jesse Eisenberg ("The Social Network") and James Franco ("127 Hours"), among others, to win the best actor Oscar. <strong>Colin Firth (2011):</strong> Colin Firth's portrayal of King George VI's fight to overcome a speech impediment beat out Jesse Eisenberg ("The Social Network") and James Franco ("127 Hours"), among others, to win the best actor Oscar. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsColin Firth (2011): Colin Firth’s portrayal of King George VI’s fight to overcome a speech impediment beat out Jesse Eisenberg (“The Social Network”) and James Franco (“127 Hours”), among others, to win the best actor Oscar. Hide Caption 84 of 93<strong>Jean Dujardin (2012):</strong> "The Artist," a silent, black-and-white movie, was a celebration of old-school film. Its star, French actor Jean Dujardin, seemed to have a virtual lock on the best actor Oscar, even though he was competing against the likes of George Clooney and Brad Pitt. When awards night arrived in 2012, Dujardin walked away with the prize. <strong>Jean Dujardin (2012):</strong> "The Artist," a silent, black-and-white movie, was a celebration of old-school film. Its star, French actor Jean Dujardin, seemed to have a virtual lock on the best actor Oscar, even though he was competing against the likes of George Clooney and Brad Pitt. When awards night arrived in 2012, Dujardin walked away with the prize. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsJean Dujardin (2012): “The Artist,” a silent, black-and-white movie, was a celebration of old-school film. Its star, French actor Jean Dujardin, seemed to have a virtual lock on the best actor Oscar, even though he was competing against the likes of George Clooney and Brad Pitt. When awards night arrived in 2012, Dujardin walked away with the prize. Hide Caption 85 of 93<strong>Daniel Day-Lewis (2013):</strong> Once again, the Oscar race for best actor was jam-packed with amazing performances, from Bradley Cooper in "Silver Linings Playbook" to Denzel Washington in "Flight." But Daniel Day-Lewis completely transformed himself into the 16th U.S. president for Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln," and he walked away with the honors at the 2013 ceremony, becoming the first three-time best actor winner.<strong>Daniel Day-Lewis (2013):</strong> Once again, the Oscar race for best actor was jam-packed with amazing performances, from Bradley Cooper in "Silver Linings Playbook" to Denzel Washington in "Flight." But Daniel Day-Lewis completely transformed himself into the 16th U.S. president for Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln," and he walked away with the honors at the 2013 ceremony, becoming the first three-time best actor winner. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsDaniel Day-Lewis (2013): Once again, the Oscar race for best actor was jam-packed with amazing performances, from Bradley Cooper in “Silver Linings Playbook” to Denzel Washington in “Flight.” But Daniel Day-Lewis completely transformed himself into the 16th U.S. president for Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln,” and he walked away with the honors at the 2013 ceremony, becoming the first three-time best actor winner.Hide Caption 86 of 93<strong>Matthew McConaughey (2014):</strong> Matthew McConaughey won for his role in "Dallas Buyers Club." He played Ron Woodroof, an HIV-positive man who smuggles drugs to AIDS patients. Co-star Jared Leto was named best supporting actor.<strong>Matthew McConaughey (2014):</strong> Matthew McConaughey won for his role in "Dallas Buyers Club." He played Ron Woodroof, an HIV-positive man who smuggles drugs to AIDS patients. Co-star Jared Leto was named best supporting actor. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsMatthew McConaughey (2014): Matthew McConaughey won for his role in “Dallas Buyers Club.” He played Ron Woodroof, an HIV-positive man who smuggles drugs to AIDS patients. Co-star Jared Leto was named best supporting actor.Hide Caption 87 of 93<strong>Eddie Redmayne (2015):</strong> Eddie Redmayne played renowned cosmologist Stephen Hawking in "The Theory of Everything."<strong>Eddie Redmayne (2015):</strong> Eddie Redmayne played renowned cosmologist Stephen Hawking in "The Theory of Everything." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsEddie Redmayne (2015): Eddie Redmayne played renowned cosmologist Stephen Hawking in “The Theory of Everything.”Hide Caption 88 of 93<strong>Leonardo DiCaprio (2016):</strong> Veteran actor Leonardo DiCaprio won his first Oscar after playing a vengeful frontiersman in "The Revenant."<strong>Leonardo DiCaprio (2016):</strong> Veteran actor Leonardo DiCaprio won his first Oscar after playing a vengeful frontiersman in "The Revenant." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsLeonardo DiCaprio (2016): Veteran actor Leonardo DiCaprio won his first Oscar after playing a vengeful frontiersman in “The Revenant.”Hide Caption 89 of 93<strong>Casey Affleck (2017):</strong> Casey Affleck won for his tragic and stoic performance in "Manchester By The Sea." At the beginning of the speech, he thanked fellow nominee Denzel Washington for being someone who "taught him how to act."<strong>Casey Affleck (2017):</strong> Casey Affleck won for his tragic and stoic performance in "Manchester By The Sea." At the beginning of the speech, he thanked fellow nominee Denzel Washington for being someone who "taught him how to act." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsCasey Affleck (2017): Casey Affleck won for his tragic and stoic performance in “Manchester By The Sea.” At the beginning of the speech, he thanked fellow nominee Denzel Washington for being someone who “taught him how to act.”Hide Caption 90 of 93<strong>Gary Oldman (2018):</strong> Decorated actor Gary Oldman won his first Oscar for his role as Winston Churchill in the World War II-era film "Darkest Hour."<strong>Gary Oldman (2018):</strong> Decorated actor Gary Oldman won his first Oscar for his role as Winston Churchill in the World War II-era film "Darkest Hour." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsGary Oldman (2018): Decorated actor Gary Oldman won his first Oscar for his role as Winston Churchill in the World War II-era film “Darkest Hour.”Hide Caption 91 of 93<strong>Rami Malek (2019):</strong> Rami Malek, who played late singer Freddie Mercury in the film "Bohemian Rhapsody," is just the second actor of Arab descent nominated for an Oscar, after "Lawrence of Arabia" star Omar Sharif. Malek is the first to win. "I am the son of immigrants from Egypt, a first-generation American," he said. "And part of my story is being written right now. And I could not be more grateful to each and every one of you, and everyone who believed in me for this moment. It's something I will treasure for the rest of my life."<strong>Rami Malek (2019):</strong> Rami Malek, who played late singer Freddie Mercury in the film "Bohemian Rhapsody," is just the second actor of Arab descent nominated for an Oscar, after "Lawrence of Arabia" star Omar Sharif. Malek is the first to win. "I am the son of immigrants from Egypt, a first-generation American," he said. "And part of my story is being written right now. And I could not be more grateful to each and every one of you, and everyone who believed in me for this moment. It's something I will treasure for the rest of my life." Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsRami Malek (2019): Rami Malek, who played late singer Freddie Mercury in the film “Bohemian Rhapsody,” is just the second actor of Arab descent nominated for an Oscar, after “Lawrence of Arabia” star Omar Sharif. Malek is the first to win. “I am the son of immigrants from Egypt, a first-generation American,” he said. “And part of my story is being written right now. And I could not be more grateful to each and every one of you, and everyone who believed in me for this moment. It’s something I will treasure for the rest of my life.”Hide Caption 92 of 93<strong>Joaquin Phoenix (2020):</strong> Phoenix became the second person to win an Oscar for playing the comic-book character Joker. The first person to win for playing the Joker was the late Heath Ledger.<strong>Joaquin Phoenix (2020):</strong> Phoenix became the second person to win an Oscar for playing the comic-book character Joker. The first person to win for playing the Joker was the late Heath Ledger. Photos: Oscar-winning best actorsJoaquin Phoenix (2020): Phoenix became the second person to win an Oscar for playing the comic-book character Joker. The first person to win for playing the Joker was the late Heath Ledger.Hide Caption 93 of 9301 oscar best actor RESTRICTED02 oscar best actor RESTRICTED03 oscar best actor 04 oscar best actor RESTRICTED05 oscar best actor RESTRICTED06 oscar best actor RESTRICTED07 oscar best actor RESTRICTED08 oscar best actor RESTRICTED09 oscar best actor RESTRICTED10 oscar best actor RESTRICTED11 oscar best actor 12 oscar best actor RESTRICTED13 oscar best actor14 oscar best actor 15 oscar best actor RESTRICTED16 oscar best actor RESTRICTED17 oscar best actor RESTRICTED18 oscar best actor 19 oscar best actor RESTRICTED20 oscar best actor 21 oscar best actor 22 oscar best actor RESTRICTED23 oscar best actor RESTRICTED24 oscar best actor RESTRICTED25 oscar best actor 26 oscar best actor27 oscar best actor RESTRICTED28 oscar best actor 29 oscar best actor RESTRICTED30 oscar best actor31 oscar best actor RESTRICTED32 oscar best actor 33 oscar best actor34 oscar best actor RESTRICTED35 oscar best actor RESTRICTED36 oscar best actor37 oscar best actor 38 oscar best actor 39 oscar best actor RESTRICTED40 oscar best actor41 oscar best actor RESTRICTED42 oscar best actor RESTRICTED43 oscar best actor 44 oscar best actor 45 oscar best actor RESTRICTED45 oscar best picture47 oscar best actor RESTRICTED48 oscar best actor RESTRICTED49 oscar best actor RESTRICTED50 oscar best actor51 oscar best actor RESTRICTED52 oscar best actor RESTRICTED53 oscar best actor RESTRICTED54 oscar best actor RESTRICTED55 oscar best actor 56 oscar best actor RESTRICTED57 oscar best actor RESTRICTED58 oscar best actor RESTRICTED59 oscar best actor RESTRICTED60 oscar best actor RESTRICTED61 oscar best actor 62 oscar best actor RESTRICTED63 oscar best actor RESTRICTED64 oscar best actor RESTRICTED65 oscar best actor RESTRICTED66 oscar best actor RESTRICTED67 oscar best actor 68 oscar best actor69 oscar best actor RESTRICTED70 oscar best actor71 oscar best actor 72 oscar best actor RESTRICTED73 oscar best actor RESTRICTED74 oscar best actor 75 oscar best actor RESTRICTED76 oscar best actor 77 oscar best actor 78 oscar best actor79 oscar best actor 80 oscar best actor 81 oscar best actor82 oscar best actor83 oscar best actor84 oscar best actor85 oscar best actor86 oscar best actorMcConaughey oscar 2014best actor redmayne01 leonardo dicaprio 0229oscars 2017 casey affleck24 oscars show gary oldman17 oscars show 2019Joaquin PhoenixOscar-winning best actressesOscar-winning best actresses Photos: Oscar-winning best actresses<strong>Janet Gaynor (1929):</strong> Douglas Fairbanks Sr. hands Janet Gaynor her best actress Oscar in 1929 for Gaynor's performance in the 1927 film ''Sunrise." It was the first best actress Oscar ever awarded.<strong>Janet Gaynor (1929):</strong> Douglas Fairbanks Sr. hands Janet Gaynor her best actress Oscar in 1929 for Gaynor's performance in the 1927 film ''Sunrise." It was the first best actress Oscar ever awarded. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJanet Gaynor (1929): Douglas Fairbanks Sr. hands Janet Gaynor her best actress Oscar in 1929 for Gaynor’s performance in the 1927 film ”Sunrise.” It was the first best actress Oscar ever awarded.Hide Caption 1 of 93<strong>Mary Pickford (1930):</strong> In 1930, there were actually two Oscar ceremonies. Actress Mary Pickford, seen here, receives her best actress Oscar in April 1930 for her performance in the 1929 film "Coquette."<strong>Mary Pickford (1930):</strong> In 1930, there were actually two Oscar ceremonies. Actress Mary Pickford, seen here, receives her best actress Oscar in April 1930 for her performance in the 1929 film "Coquette." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesMary Pickford (1930): In 1930, there were actually two Oscar ceremonies. Actress Mary Pickford, seen here, receives her best actress Oscar in April 1930 for her performance in the 1929 film “Coquette.”Hide Caption 2 of 93<strong>Norma Shearer (1930):</strong> Norma Shearer receives a best actress Oscar in October 1930 for her role in "The Divorcee." Giving her the award is Conrad Nagel, who starred with her in the film released earlier that year.<strong>Norma Shearer (1930):</strong> Norma Shearer receives a best actress Oscar in October 1930 for her role in "The Divorcee." Giving her the award is Conrad Nagel, who starred with her in the film released earlier that year. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesNorma Shearer (1930): Norma Shearer receives a best actress Oscar in October 1930 for her role in “The Divorcee.” Giving her the award is Conrad Nagel, who starred with her in the film released earlier that year.Hide Caption 3 of 93<strong>Marie Dressler (1931):</strong> Marie Dressler and Lionel Barrymore collect their best actress and best actor Oscars in 1931. Dressler won for "Min and Bill" and Barrymore won for "A Free Soul."<strong>Marie Dressler (1931):</strong> Marie Dressler and Lionel Barrymore collect their best actress and best actor Oscars in 1931. Dressler won for "Min and Bill" and Barrymore won for "A Free Soul." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesMarie Dressler (1931): Marie Dressler and Lionel Barrymore collect their best actress and best actor Oscars in 1931. Dressler won for “Min and Bill” and Barrymore won for “A Free Soul.”Hide Caption 4 of 93<strong>Helen Hayes (1932):</strong> Film producer Louis B. Mayer presents the best actress Oscar to Helen Hayes for her role in "The Sin of Madelon Claudet."<strong>Helen Hayes (1932):</strong> Film producer Louis B. Mayer presents the best actress Oscar to Helen Hayes for her role in "The Sin of Madelon Claudet." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesHelen Hayes (1932): Film producer Louis B. Mayer presents the best actress Oscar to Helen Hayes for her role in “The Sin of Madelon Claudet.”Hide Caption 5 of 93<strong>Katharine Hepburn (1934):</strong> Douglas Fairbanks Jr. and Katharine Hepburn appear in the 1933 film "Morning Glory." Hepburn's performance earned her the best actress Oscar in 1934. There was no Academy Awards ceremony in 1933; films from that year and the last half of 1932 were eligible to win at the 1934 ceremony.<strong>Katharine Hepburn (1934):</strong> Douglas Fairbanks Jr. and Katharine Hepburn appear in the 1933 film "Morning Glory." Hepburn's performance earned her the best actress Oscar in 1934. There was no Academy Awards ceremony in 1933; films from that year and the last half of 1932 were eligible to win at the 1934 ceremony. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesKatharine Hepburn (1934): Douglas Fairbanks Jr. and Katharine Hepburn appear in the 1933 film “Morning Glory.” Hepburn’s performance earned her the best actress Oscar in 1934. There was no Academy Awards ceremony in 1933; films from that year and the last half of 1932 were eligible to win at the 1934 ceremony.Hide Caption 6 of 93<strong>Claudette Colbert (1935):</strong> Claudette Colbert won the best actress Oscar in 1935 for "It Happened One Night," a film that was the first to win all five of the major Academy Award categories -- best picture, best director, best actor, best actress and best screenplay.<strong>Claudette Colbert (1935):</strong> Claudette Colbert won the best actress Oscar in 1935 for "It Happened One Night," a film that was the first to win all five of the major Academy Award categories -- best picture, best director, best actor, best actress and best screenplay. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesClaudette Colbert (1935): Claudette Colbert won the best actress Oscar in 1935 for “It Happened One Night,” a film that was the first to win all five of the major Academy Award categories — best picture, best director, best actor, best actress and best screenplay.Hide Caption 7 of 93<strong>Bette Davis (1936):</strong> Bette Davis and film producer Jack L. Warner hold Davis' best actress Oscar at the ceremony held in 1936. Davis won her first Oscar for her role in the film "Dangerous."<strong>Bette Davis (1936):</strong> Bette Davis and film producer Jack L. Warner hold Davis' best actress Oscar at the ceremony held in 1936. Davis won her first Oscar for her role in the film "Dangerous." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesBette Davis (1936): Bette Davis and film producer Jack L. Warner hold Davis’ best actress Oscar at the ceremony held in 1936. Davis won her first Oscar for her role in the film “Dangerous.”Hide Caption 8 of 93<strong>Luise Rainer (1937):</strong> Luise Rainer, second from left, is seen at the 1937 ceremony with, from left, Louis B. Mayer, Louise Tracy and Frank Capra. Rainer won for "The Great Ziegfeld."<strong>Luise Rainer (1937):</strong> Luise Rainer, second from left, is seen at the 1937 ceremony with, from left, Louis B. Mayer, Louise Tracy and Frank Capra. Rainer won for "The Great Ziegfeld." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesLuise Rainer (1937): Luise Rainer, second from left, is seen at the 1937 ceremony with, from left, Louis B. Mayer, Louise Tracy and Frank Capra. Rainer won for “The Great Ziegfeld.”Hide Caption 9 of 93<strong>Luise Rainer (1938):</strong> For her performance in "The Good Earth," Luise Rainer won the best actress Oscar for the second consecutive year.<strong>Luise Rainer (1938):</strong> For her performance in "The Good Earth," Luise Rainer won the best actress Oscar for the second consecutive year. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesLuise Rainer (1938): For her performance in “The Good Earth,” Luise Rainer won the best actress Oscar for the second consecutive year.Hide Caption 10 of 93<strong>Bette Davis (1939):</strong> Bette Davis won her second Oscar in 1939, this time for "Jezebel."<strong>Bette Davis (1939):</strong> Bette Davis won her second Oscar in 1939, this time for "Jezebel." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesBette Davis (1939): Bette Davis won her second Oscar in 1939, this time for “Jezebel.”Hide Caption 11 of 93<strong>Vivien Leigh (1940):</strong> Vivien Leigh accepts her Oscar in 1940 for her performance in "Gone With the Wind."<strong>Vivien Leigh (1940):</strong> Vivien Leigh accepts her Oscar in 1940 for her performance in "Gone With the Wind." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesVivien Leigh (1940): Vivien Leigh accepts her Oscar in 1940 for her performance in “Gone With the Wind.”Hide Caption 12 of 93<strong>Ginger Rogers (1941):</strong> Actors James Stewart and Ginger Rogers smile after winning Oscars in 1941. Stewart won best actor for his performance in "The Philadelphia Story," while Rogers won best actress for her performance in "Kitty Foyle: The Natural History of a Woman."<strong>Ginger Rogers (1941):</strong> Actors James Stewart and Ginger Rogers smile after winning Oscars in 1941. Stewart won best actor for his performance in "The Philadelphia Story," while Rogers won best actress for her performance in "Kitty Foyle: The Natural History of a Woman." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesGinger Rogers (1941): Actors James Stewart and Ginger Rogers smile after winning Oscars in 1941. Stewart won best actor for his performance in “The Philadelphia Story,” while Rogers won best actress for her performance in “Kitty Foyle: The Natural History of a Woman.”Hide Caption 13 of 93<strong>Joan Fontaine (1942):</strong> Joan Fontaine looks at the best actress Oscar she won for her role in the film "Suspicion." <strong>Joan Fontaine (1942):</strong> Joan Fontaine looks at the best actress Oscar she won for her role in the film "Suspicion." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJoan Fontaine (1942): Joan Fontaine looks at the best actress Oscar she won for her role in the film “Suspicion.” Hide Caption 14 of 93<strong>Greer Garson (1943):</strong> After winning the best actress Oscar in 1943, Greer Garson gets a congratulatory kiss from her "Mrs. Miniver" co-star Walter Pidgeon.<strong>Greer Garson (1943):</strong> After winning the best actress Oscar in 1943, Greer Garson gets a congratulatory kiss from her "Mrs. Miniver" co-star Walter Pidgeon. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesGreer Garson (1943): After winning the best actress Oscar in 1943, Greer Garson gets a congratulatory kiss from her “Mrs. Miniver” co-star Walter Pidgeon.Hide Caption 15 of 93<strong>Jennifer Jones (1944):</strong> Jennifer Jones holds the best actress Oscar she won in 1944 for her performance in "Song of Bernadette." To her right is actress Ingrid Bergman.<strong>Jennifer Jones (1944):</strong> Jennifer Jones holds the best actress Oscar she won in 1944 for her performance in "Song of Bernadette." To her right is actress Ingrid Bergman. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJennifer Jones (1944): Jennifer Jones holds the best actress Oscar she won in 1944 for her performance in “Song of Bernadette.” To her right is actress Ingrid Bergman.Hide Caption 16 of 93<strong>Ingrid Bergman (1945):</strong> Ingrid Bergman didn't have to wait long to hold her own best actress award. Here, she poses with the Oscar she earned for her role in the film "Gaslight."<strong>Ingrid Bergman (1945):</strong> Ingrid Bergman didn't have to wait long to hold her own best actress award. Here, she poses with the Oscar she earned for her role in the film "Gaslight." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesIngrid Bergman (1945): Ingrid Bergman didn’t have to wait long to hold her own best actress award. Here, she poses with the Oscar she earned for her role in the film “Gaslight.”Hide Caption 17 of 93<strong>Joan Crawford (1946):</strong> Joan Crawford receives her Academy Award in bed because of an illness. She was recognized for her performance in the 1945 film "Mildred Pierce."<strong>Joan Crawford (1946):</strong> Joan Crawford receives her Academy Award in bed because of an illness. She was recognized for her performance in the 1945 film "Mildred Pierce." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJoan Crawford (1946): Joan Crawford receives her Academy Award in bed because of an illness. She was recognized for her performance in the 1945 film “Mildred Pierce.”Hide Caption 18 of 93<strong>Olivia de Havilland (1947):</strong> Olivia de Havilland receives her best actress Oscar from actor Ray Milland for her performance in "To Each His Own."<strong>Olivia de Havilland (1947):</strong> Olivia de Havilland receives her best actress Oscar from actor Ray Milland for her performance in "To Each His Own." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesOlivia de Havilland (1947): Olivia de Havilland receives her best actress Oscar from actor Ray Milland for her performance in “To Each His Own.”Hide Caption 19 of 93<strong>Loretta Young (1948):</strong> Loretta Young, second from left, won the best actress Oscar in 1948 for her role in "Farmer's Daughter."<strong>Loretta Young (1948):</strong> Loretta Young, second from left, won the best actress Oscar in 1948 for her role in "Farmer's Daughter." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesLoretta Young (1948): Loretta Young, second from left, won the best actress Oscar in 1948 for her role in “Farmer’s Daughter.”Hide Caption 20 of 93<strong>Jane Wyman (1949):</strong> Jane Wyman stands by a doorway backstage at the Academy Awards. She won her best actress Oscar for the film "Johnny Belinda."<strong>Jane Wyman (1949):</strong> Jane Wyman stands by a doorway backstage at the Academy Awards. She won her best actress Oscar for the film "Johnny Belinda." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJane Wyman (1949): Jane Wyman stands by a doorway backstage at the Academy Awards. She won her best actress Oscar for the film “Johnny Belinda.”Hide Caption 21 of 93<strong>Olivia de Havilland (1950):</strong> Olivia de Havilland looks at her two best actress Oscars. She won her second in 1950 for her role in "The Heiress."<strong>Olivia de Havilland (1950):</strong> Olivia de Havilland looks at her two best actress Oscars. She won her second in 1950 for her role in "The Heiress." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesOlivia de Havilland (1950): Olivia de Havilland looks at her two best actress Oscars. She won her second in 1950 for her role in “The Heiress.”Hide Caption 22 of 93<strong>Judy Holliday (1951):</strong> Judy Holliday bursts into tears in 1951 after winning the best actress Oscar for her performance in "Born Yesterday."<strong>Judy Holliday (1951):</strong> Judy Holliday bursts into tears in 1951 after winning the best actress Oscar for her performance in "Born Yesterday." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJudy Holliday (1951): Judy Holliday bursts into tears in 1951 after winning the best actress Oscar for her performance in “Born Yesterday.”Hide Caption 23 of 93<strong>Vivien Leigh (1952):</strong> Vivien Leigh appears with Karl Malden in "A Streetcar Named Desire." Her performance in the film earned her a second Oscar.<strong>Vivien Leigh (1952):</strong> Vivien Leigh appears with Karl Malden in "A Streetcar Named Desire." Her performance in the film earned her a second Oscar. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesVivien Leigh (1952): Vivien Leigh appears with Karl Malden in “A Streetcar Named Desire.” Her performance in the film earned her a second Oscar.Hide Caption 24 of 93<strong>Shirley Booth (1953):</strong> Shirley Booth wins the best actress Oscar for "Come Back, Little Sheba" in 1953.<strong>Shirley Booth (1953):</strong> Shirley Booth wins the best actress Oscar for "Come Back, Little Sheba" in 1953. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesShirley Booth (1953): Shirley Booth wins the best actress Oscar for “Come Back, Little Sheba” in 1953.Hide Caption 25 of 93<strong>Audrey Hepburn (1954):</strong> Audrey Hepburn is surrounded by reporters as she holds her best actress Oscar for "Roman Holiday."<strong>Audrey Hepburn (1954):</strong> Audrey Hepburn is surrounded by reporters as she holds her best actress Oscar for "Roman Holiday." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesAudrey Hepburn (1954): Audrey Hepburn is surrounded by reporters as she holds her best actress Oscar for “Roman Holiday.”Hide Caption 26 of 93<strong>Grace Kelly (1955):</strong> Grace Kelly poses with her Oscar after the Academy Awards ceremony in 1955. She won the statuette for her role in "The Country Girl."<strong>Grace Kelly (1955):</strong> Grace Kelly poses with her Oscar after the Academy Awards ceremony in 1955. She won the statuette for her role in "The Country Girl." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesGrace Kelly (1955): Grace Kelly poses with her Oscar after the Academy Awards ceremony in 1955. She won the statuette for her role in “The Country Girl.”Hide Caption 27 of 93<strong>Anna Magnani (1956):</strong> Anna Magnani enthusiastically holds the Oscar she won for "Rose Tattoo." The award was presented to her by U.S. Ambassador Clare Luce at the Villa Taverna in Rome. <strong>Anna Magnani (1956):</strong> Anna Magnani enthusiastically holds the Oscar she won for "Rose Tattoo." The award was presented to her by U.S. Ambassador Clare Luce at the Villa Taverna in Rome. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesAnna Magnani (1956): Anna Magnani enthusiastically holds the Oscar she won for “Rose Tattoo.” The award was presented to her by U.S. Ambassador Clare Luce at the Villa Taverna in Rome. Hide Caption 28 of 93<strong>Ingrid Bergman (1957):</strong> Ingrid Bergman, right, appears with Helen Hayes in a scene from the movie "Anastasia." Her performance earned her a second Oscar for best actress.<strong>Ingrid Bergman (1957):</strong> Ingrid Bergman, right, appears with Helen Hayes in a scene from the movie "Anastasia." Her performance earned her a second Oscar for best actress. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesIngrid Bergman (1957): Ingrid Bergman, right, appears with Helen Hayes in a scene from the movie “Anastasia.” Her performance earned her a second Oscar for best actress.Hide Caption 29 of 93<strong>Joanne Woodward (1958):</strong> Joanne Woodward smiles while holding her best actress Oscar (and a cigarette). She received the award for her role in the film "Three Faces of Eve."<strong>Joanne Woodward (1958):</strong> Joanne Woodward smiles while holding her best actress Oscar (and a cigarette). She received the award for her role in the film "Three Faces of Eve." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJoanne Woodward (1958): Joanne Woodward smiles while holding her best actress Oscar (and a cigarette). She received the award for her role in the film “Three Faces of Eve.”Hide Caption 30 of 93<strong>Susan Hayward (1959):</strong> From left, actor Burl Ives, actress Susan Hayward and actor David Niven pose with their Oscars in 1959. Hayward won for her role in "I Want to Live!"<strong>Susan Hayward (1959):</strong> From left, actor Burl Ives, actress Susan Hayward and actor David Niven pose with their Oscars in 1959. Hayward won for her role in "I Want to Live!" Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesSusan Hayward (1959): From left, actor Burl Ives, actress Susan Hayward and actor David Niven pose with their Oscars in 1959. Hayward won for her role in “I Want to Live!”Hide Caption 31 of 93<strong>Simone Signoret (1960):</strong> Actress Simone Signoret, seen here next to actor Rock Hudson at the Academy Awards ceremony in 1960, won the best actress Oscar for her role in "Room at the Top." <strong>Simone Signoret (1960):</strong> Actress Simone Signoret, seen here next to actor Rock Hudson at the Academy Awards ceremony in 1960, won the best actress Oscar for her role in "Room at the Top." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesSimone Signoret (1960): Actress Simone Signoret, seen here next to actor Rock Hudson at the Academy Awards ceremony in 1960, won the best actress Oscar for her role in “Room at the Top.” Hide Caption 32 of 93<strong>Elizabeth Taylor (1961):</strong> Elizabeth Taylor is seen with her Oscar after being named best actress for her part in "Butterfield 8."<strong>Elizabeth Taylor (1961):</strong> Elizabeth Taylor is seen with her Oscar after being named best actress for her part in "Butterfield 8." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesElizabeth Taylor (1961): Elizabeth Taylor is seen with her Oscar after being named best actress for her part in “Butterfield 8.”Hide Caption 33 of 93<strong>Sophia Loren (1962):</strong> Sophia Loren reacts after winning best actress for the film "La Ciociara."<strong>Sophia Loren (1962):</strong> Sophia Loren reacts after winning best actress for the film "La Ciociara." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesSophia Loren (1962): Sophia Loren reacts after winning best actress for the film “La Ciociara.”Hide Caption 34 of 93<strong>Anne Bancroft (1963):</strong> Anne Bancroft cries in her New York apartment as she accepts a congratulatory phone call following her win for "The Miracle Worker."<strong>Anne Bancroft (1963):</strong> Anne Bancroft cries in her New York apartment as she accepts a congratulatory phone call following her win for "The Miracle Worker." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesAnne Bancroft (1963): Anne Bancroft cries in her New York apartment as she accepts a congratulatory phone call following her win for “The Miracle Worker.”Hide Caption 35 of 93<strong>Patricia Neal (1964):</strong> Patricia Neal and her three children look at her Oscar statuette, which she won in 1964 for her role in "Hud." <strong>Patricia Neal (1964):</strong> Patricia Neal and her three children look at her Oscar statuette, which she won in 1964 for her role in "Hud." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesPatricia Neal (1964): Patricia Neal and her three children look at her Oscar statuette, which she won in 1964 for her role in “Hud.” Hide Caption 36 of 93<strong>Julie Andrews (1965): </strong>Julie Andrews looks at the Academy Award she won for "Mary Poppins'" in 1965. The role was her film debut.  <strong>Julie Andrews (1965): </strong>Julie Andrews looks at the Academy Award she won for "Mary Poppins'" in 1965. The role was her film debut.  Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJulie Andrews (1965): Julie Andrews looks at the Academy Award she won for “Mary Poppins'” in 1965. The role was her film debut. Hide Caption 37 of 93<strong>Julie Christie (1966):</strong> Julie Christie is seen with her Academy Award, which she won for her role in "Darling."<strong>Julie Christie (1966):</strong> Julie Christie is seen with her Academy Award, which she won for her role in "Darling." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJulie Christie (1966): Julie Christie is seen with her Academy Award, which she won for her role in “Darling.”Hide Caption 38 of 93<strong>Elizabeth Taylor (1967):</strong> Elizabeth Taylor holds up her second Oscar, this one for the film "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf."<strong>Elizabeth Taylor (1967):</strong> Elizabeth Taylor holds up her second Oscar, this one for the film "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesElizabeth Taylor (1967): Elizabeth Taylor holds up her second Oscar, this one for the film “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf.”Hide Caption 39 of 93<strong>Katharine Hepburn (1968):</strong> Katharine Hepburn and Cecil Kellaway appear in a scene from "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner." Hepburn won her second Oscar more than 30 years after her first.<strong>Katharine Hepburn (1968):</strong> Katharine Hepburn and Cecil Kellaway appear in a scene from "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner." Hepburn won her second Oscar more than 30 years after her first. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesKatharine Hepburn (1968): Katharine Hepburn and Cecil Kellaway appear in a scene from “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner.” Hepburn won her second Oscar more than 30 years after her first.Hide Caption 40 of 93<strong>Barbra Streisand (1969):</strong> Barbra Streisand gazes at the best actress statuette she won for "Funny Girl." There was a tie for the award in 1969, with the other winner being Katharine Hepburn.<strong>Barbra Streisand (1969):</strong> Barbra Streisand gazes at the best actress statuette she won for "Funny Girl." There was a tie for the award in 1969, with the other winner being Katharine Hepburn. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesBarbra Streisand (1969): Barbra Streisand gazes at the best actress statuette she won for “Funny Girl.” There was a tie for the award in 1969, with the other winner being Katharine Hepburn.Hide Caption 41 of 93<strong>Katharine Hepburn (1969):</strong> Katharine Hepburn and Peter O'Toole appear in "The Lion in Winter." The film earned Hepburn her third Oscar for best actress.<strong>Katharine Hepburn (1969):</strong> Katharine Hepburn and Peter O'Toole appear in "The Lion in Winter." The film earned Hepburn her third Oscar for best actress. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesKatharine Hepburn (1969): Katharine Hepburn and Peter O’Toole appear in “The Lion in Winter.” The film earned Hepburn her third Oscar for best actress.Hide Caption 42 of 93<strong>Maggie Smith (1970):</strong> Maggie Smith, who won for "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie," celebrates with her husband at the time, Robert Stephens.<strong>Maggie Smith (1970):</strong> Maggie Smith, who won for "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie," celebrates with her husband at the time, Robert Stephens. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesMaggie Smith (1970): Maggie Smith, who won for “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie,” celebrates with her husband at the time, Robert Stephens.Hide Caption 43 of 93<strong>Glenda Jackson (1971):</strong> Glenda Jackson won the best actress Oscar for her part in "Women In Love."<strong>Glenda Jackson (1971):</strong> Glenda Jackson won the best actress Oscar for her part in "Women In Love." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesGlenda Jackson (1971): Glenda Jackson won the best actress Oscar for her part in “Women In Love.”Hide Caption 44 of 93<strong>Jane Fonda (1972):</strong> Jane Fonda cradles the best actress Oscar she received for "Klute."<strong>Jane Fonda (1972):</strong> Jane Fonda cradles the best actress Oscar she received for "Klute." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJane Fonda (1972): Jane Fonda cradles the best actress Oscar she received for “Klute.”Hide Caption 45 of 93<strong>Liza Minnelli (1973):</strong> Liza Minnelli holds the Oscar she won for "Cabaret."<strong>Liza Minnelli (1973):</strong> Liza Minnelli holds the Oscar she won for "Cabaret." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesLiza Minnelli (1973): Liza Minnelli holds the Oscar she won for “Cabaret.”Hide Caption 46 of 93<strong>Glenda Jackson (1974):</strong> George Segal and Glenda Jackson appear in a scene from "A Touch of Class," which snagged Jackson the best actress Oscar in 1974.<strong>Glenda Jackson (1974):</strong> George Segal and Glenda Jackson appear in a scene from "A Touch of Class," which snagged Jackson the best actress Oscar in 1974. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesGlenda Jackson (1974): George Segal and Glenda Jackson appear in a scene from “A Touch of Class,” which snagged Jackson the best actress Oscar in 1974.Hide Caption 47 of 93<strong>Ellen Burstyn (1975):</strong> Ellen Burstyn, left, appears in "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore," which won her the best actress Oscar in 1975. <strong>Ellen Burstyn (1975):</strong> Ellen Burstyn, left, appears in "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore," which won her the best actress Oscar in 1975. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesEllen Burstyn (1975): Ellen Burstyn, left, appears in “Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore,” which won her the best actress Oscar in 1975. Hide Caption 48 of 93<strong>Louise Fletcher (1976):</strong> From left, producer Saul Zaentz, actor Jack Nicholson, actress Louise Fletcher and producer Michael Douglas pose with their Oscars at the 1976 Academy Awards ceremony. They all won for the film "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," which swept the major categories that year.<strong>Louise Fletcher (1976):</strong> From left, producer Saul Zaentz, actor Jack Nicholson, actress Louise Fletcher and producer Michael Douglas pose with their Oscars at the 1976 Academy Awards ceremony. They all won for the film "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," which swept the major categories that year. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesLouise Fletcher (1976): From left, producer Saul Zaentz, actor Jack Nicholson, actress Louise Fletcher and producer Michael Douglas pose with their Oscars at the 1976 Academy Awards ceremony. They all won for the film “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” which swept the major categories that year.Hide Caption 49 of 93<strong>Faye Dunaway (1977):</strong> Faye Dunaway rests by the Beverly Hills Hotel swimming pool the morning after she received the best actress Oscar for "Network."<strong>Faye Dunaway (1977):</strong> Faye Dunaway rests by the Beverly Hills Hotel swimming pool the morning after she received the best actress Oscar for "Network." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesFaye Dunaway (1977): Faye Dunaway rests by the Beverly Hills Hotel swimming pool the morning after she received the best actress Oscar for “Network.”Hide Caption 50 of 93<strong>Diane Keaton (1978):</strong> Diane Keaton places her Oscar on a restaurant table after the Academy Awards ceremony in 1978. She received the award for her role in "Annie Hall."<strong>Diane Keaton (1978):</strong> Diane Keaton places her Oscar on a restaurant table after the Academy Awards ceremony in 1978. She received the award for her role in "Annie Hall." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesDiane Keaton (1978): Diane Keaton places her Oscar on a restaurant table after the Academy Awards ceremony in 1978. She received the award for her role in “Annie Hall.”Hide Caption 51 of 93<strong>Jane Fonda (1979):</strong> Jane Fonda is ecstatic about winning her second Academy Award, this one for "Coming Home."<strong>Jane Fonda (1979):</strong> Jane Fonda is ecstatic about winning her second Academy Award, this one for "Coming Home." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJane Fonda (1979): Jane Fonda is ecstatic about winning her second Academy Award, this one for “Coming Home.”Hide Caption 52 of 93<strong>Sally Field (1980):</strong> Sally Field accepts the best actress Oscar for her role in "Norma Rae."<strong>Sally Field (1980):</strong> Sally Field accepts the best actress Oscar for her role in "Norma Rae." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesSally Field (1980): Sally Field accepts the best actress Oscar for her role in “Norma Rae.”Hide Caption 53 of 93<strong>Sissy Spacek (1981):</strong> Sissy Spacek accepts the best actress Oscar for her role in the film "Coal Miner's Daughter."<strong>Sissy Spacek (1981):</strong> Sissy Spacek accepts the best actress Oscar for her role in the film "Coal Miner's Daughter." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesSissy Spacek (1981): Sissy Spacek accepts the best actress Oscar for her role in the film “Coal Miner’s Daughter.”Hide Caption 54 of 93<strong>Katharine Hepburn (1982):</strong> Henry Fonda and Katharine Hepburn appear in a scene from "On Golden Pond," which won Hepburn her fourth Oscar for best actress.<strong>Katharine Hepburn (1982):</strong> Henry Fonda and Katharine Hepburn appear in a scene from "On Golden Pond," which won Hepburn her fourth Oscar for best actress. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesKatharine Hepburn (1982): Henry Fonda and Katharine Hepburn appear in a scene from “On Golden Pond,” which won Hepburn her fourth Oscar for best actress.Hide Caption 55 of 93<strong>Meryl Streep (1983):</strong> Meryl Streep holds her best actress Oscar for "Sophie's Choice." <strong>Meryl Streep (1983):</strong> Meryl Streep holds her best actress Oscar for "Sophie's Choice." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesMeryl Streep (1983): Meryl Streep holds her best actress Oscar for “Sophie’s Choice.” Hide Caption 56 of 93<strong>Shirley MacLaine (1984):</strong> Shirley MacLaine accepts her Oscar in 1984. She won for her performance in "Terms of Endearment." <strong>Shirley MacLaine (1984):</strong> Shirley MacLaine accepts her Oscar in 1984. She won for her performance in "Terms of Endearment." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesShirley MacLaine (1984): Shirley MacLaine accepts her Oscar in 1984. She won for her performance in “Terms of Endearment.” Hide Caption 57 of 93<strong>Sally Field (1985):</strong> Sally Field holds the best actress Oscar in the press room at the Academy Awards. She won the award, her second, for her role in "Places in the Heart."<strong>Sally Field (1985):</strong> Sally Field holds the best actress Oscar in the press room at the Academy Awards. She won the award, her second, for her role in "Places in the Heart." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesSally Field (1985): Sally Field holds the best actress Oscar in the press room at the Academy Awards. She won the award, her second, for her role in “Places in the Heart.”Hide Caption 58 of 93<strong>Geraldine Page (1986):</strong> Geraldine Page wins best actress for "The Trip to Bountiful."<strong>Geraldine Page (1986):</strong> Geraldine Page wins best actress for "The Trip to Bountiful." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesGeraldine Page (1986): Geraldine Page wins best actress for “The Trip to Bountiful.”Hide Caption 59 of 93<strong>Marlee Matlin (1987):</strong> Hearing-impaired actress Marlee Matlin uses sign language while holding the Academy Award she won for "Children of a Lesser God."<strong>Marlee Matlin (1987):</strong> Hearing-impaired actress Marlee Matlin uses sign language while holding the Academy Award she won for "Children of a Lesser God." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesMarlee Matlin (1987): Hearing-impaired actress Marlee Matlin uses sign language while holding the Academy Award she won for “Children of a Lesser God.”Hide Caption 60 of 93<strong>Cher (1988):</strong> Cher wears <em>that</em> dress in 1988, when she won the Academy Award for "Moonstruck."<strong>Cher (1988):</strong> Cher wears <em>that</em> dress in 1988, when she won the Academy Award for "Moonstruck." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesCher (1988): Cher wears that dress in 1988, when she won the Academy Award for “Moonstruck.”Hide Caption 61 of 93<strong>Jodie Foster (1989): </strong>Jodie Foster holds her Oscar in the press room after winning for her role in "The Accused."<strong>Jodie Foster (1989): </strong>Jodie Foster holds her Oscar in the press room after winning for her role in "The Accused." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJodie Foster (1989): Jodie Foster holds her Oscar in the press room after winning for her role in “The Accused.”Hide Caption 62 of 93<strong>Jessica Tandy (1990): </strong>Jessica Tandy acknowledges applause after receiving the Oscar for her role in "Driving Miss Daisy."<strong>Jessica Tandy (1990): </strong>Jessica Tandy acknowledges applause after receiving the Oscar for her role in "Driving Miss Daisy." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJessica Tandy (1990): Jessica Tandy acknowledges applause after receiving the Oscar for her role in “Driving Miss Daisy.”Hide Caption 63 of 93<strong>Kathy Bates (1991):</strong> Kathy Bates, far left, clutches the best actress award for her role in "Misery." To her left are fellow Oscar winners Jeremy Irons, Whoopi Goldberg and Joe Pesci.<strong>Kathy Bates (1991):</strong> Kathy Bates, far left, clutches the best actress award for her role in "Misery." To her left are fellow Oscar winners Jeremy Irons, Whoopi Goldberg and Joe Pesci. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesKathy Bates (1991): Kathy Bates, far left, clutches the best actress award for her role in “Misery.” To her left are fellow Oscar winners Jeremy Irons, Whoopi Goldberg and Joe Pesci.Hide Caption 64 of 93<strong>Jodie Foster (1992):</strong> Jodie Foster holds up her second Oscar, this one for her role in "The Silence of the Lambs."<strong>Jodie Foster (1992):</strong> Jodie Foster holds up her second Oscar, this one for her role in "The Silence of the Lambs." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJodie Foster (1992): Jodie Foster holds up her second Oscar, this one for her role in “The Silence of the Lambs.”Hide Caption 65 of 93<strong>Emma Thompson (1993):</strong> Emma Thompson poses with her Oscar after winning best actress for her role in "Howards End." <strong>Emma Thompson (1993):</strong> Emma Thompson poses with her Oscar after winning best actress for her role in "Howards End." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesEmma Thompson (1993): Emma Thompson poses with her Oscar after winning best actress for her role in “Howards End.” Hide Caption 66 of 93<strong>Holly Hunter (1994):</strong> Holly Hunter poses in the press room after being awarded the best actress Oscar for her performance in "The Piano."<strong>Holly Hunter (1994):</strong> Holly Hunter poses in the press room after being awarded the best actress Oscar for her performance in "The Piano." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesHolly Hunter (1994): Holly Hunter poses in the press room after being awarded the best actress Oscar for her performance in “The Piano.”Hide Caption 67 of 93<strong>Jessica Lange (1995):</strong> Jessica Lange holds the Oscar she won for her role in the film "Blue Sky." <strong>Jessica Lange (1995):</strong> Jessica Lange holds the Oscar she won for her role in the film "Blue Sky." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJessica Lange (1995): Jessica Lange holds the Oscar she won for her role in the film “Blue Sky.” Hide Caption 68 of 93<strong>Susan Sarandon (1996):</strong> Susan Sarandon accepts the Oscar for her role in "Dead Man Walking." <strong>Susan Sarandon (1996):</strong> Susan Sarandon accepts the Oscar for her role in "Dead Man Walking." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesSusan Sarandon (1996): Susan Sarandon accepts the Oscar for her role in “Dead Man Walking.” Hide Caption 69 of 93<strong>Frances McDormand (1997):</strong> Frances McDormand, who won best actress for her role in "Fargo," poses with Geoffrey Rush, who won best actor that year. <strong>Frances McDormand (1997):</strong> Frances McDormand, who won best actress for her role in "Fargo," poses with Geoffrey Rush, who won best actor that year. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesFrances McDormand (1997): Frances McDormand, who won best actress for her role in “Fargo,” poses with Geoffrey Rush, who won best actor that year. Hide Caption 70 of 93<strong>Helen Hunt (1998):</strong> Helen Hunt holds her Oscar after winning for "As Good As It Gets." <strong>Helen Hunt (1998):</strong> Helen Hunt holds her Oscar after winning for "As Good As It Gets." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesHelen Hunt (1998): Helen Hunt holds her Oscar after winning for “As Good As It Gets.” Hide Caption 71 of 93<strong>Gwyneth Paltrow (1999):</strong> Gwyneth Paltrow cries as she receives the best actress Oscar for "Shakespeare in Love." <strong>Gwyneth Paltrow (1999):</strong> Gwyneth Paltrow cries as she receives the best actress Oscar for "Shakespeare in Love." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesGwyneth Paltrow (1999): Gwyneth Paltrow cries as she receives the best actress Oscar for “Shakespeare in Love.” Hide Caption 72 of 93<strong>Hilary Swank (2000):</strong> Actor Roberto Benigni presents Hilary Swank, who won the best actress Oscar for the film "Boys Don't Cry."<strong>Hilary Swank (2000):</strong> Actor Roberto Benigni presents Hilary Swank, who won the best actress Oscar for the film "Boys Don't Cry." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesHilary Swank (2000): Actor Roberto Benigni presents Hilary Swank, who won the best actress Oscar for the film “Boys Don’t Cry.”Hide Caption 73 of 93<strong>Julia Roberts (2001):</strong> Julia Roberts holds her Oscar for her role in "Erin Brockovich." <strong>Julia Roberts (2001):</strong> Julia Roberts holds her Oscar for her role in "Erin Brockovich." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJulia Roberts (2001): Julia Roberts holds her Oscar for her role in “Erin Brockovich.” Hide Caption 74 of 93<strong>Halle Berry (2002):</strong> Halle Berry celebrates as she holds her Oscar for "Monster's Ball." Berry is the only African-American to win the Oscar for best actress.<strong>Halle Berry (2002):</strong> Halle Berry celebrates as she holds her Oscar for "Monster's Ball." Berry is the only African-American to win the Oscar for best actress. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesHalle Berry (2002): Halle Berry celebrates as she holds her Oscar for “Monster’s Ball.” Berry is the only African-American to win the Oscar for best actress.Hide Caption 75 of 93<strong>Nicole Kidman (2003):</strong> Nicole Kidman accepts her award for her role in "The Hours." <strong>Nicole Kidman (2003):</strong> Nicole Kidman accepts her award for her role in "The Hours." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesNicole Kidman (2003): Nicole Kidman accepts her award for her role in “The Hours.” Hide Caption 76 of 93<strong>Charlize Theron (2004):</strong> Charlize Theron poses with her Oscar after winning for the film "Monster."<strong>Charlize Theron (2004):</strong> Charlize Theron poses with her Oscar after winning for the film "Monster." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesCharlize Theron (2004): Charlize Theron poses with her Oscar after winning for the film “Monster.”Hide Caption 77 of 93<strong>Hilary Swank (2005):</strong> Hilary Swank grabbed her second Academy Award in 2005 for the film "Million Dollar Baby."<strong>Hilary Swank (2005):</strong> Hilary Swank grabbed her second Academy Award in 2005 for the film "Million Dollar Baby." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesHilary Swank (2005): Hilary Swank grabbed her second Academy Award in 2005 for the film “Million Dollar Baby.”Hide Caption 78 of 93<strong>Reese Witherspoon (2006):</strong> Reese Witherspoon kisses then-husband Ryan Phillippe before going on stage to accept the best actress award for "Walk the Line."<strong>Reese Witherspoon (2006):</strong> Reese Witherspoon kisses then-husband Ryan Phillippe before going on stage to accept the best actress award for "Walk the Line." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesReese Witherspoon (2006): Reese Witherspoon kisses then-husband Ryan Phillippe before going on stage to accept the best actress award for “Walk the Line.”Hide Caption 79 of 93<strong>Helen Mirren (2007):</strong> Director Taylor Hackford kisses his wife, Helen Mirren, after Mirren won the best actress Oscar for her role in "The Queen."<strong>Helen Mirren (2007):</strong> Director Taylor Hackford kisses his wife, Helen Mirren, after Mirren won the best actress Oscar for her role in "The Queen." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesHelen Mirren (2007): Director Taylor Hackford kisses his wife, Helen Mirren, after Mirren won the best actress Oscar for her role in “The Queen.”Hide Caption 80 of 93<strong>Marion Cotillard (2008):</strong> Marion Cotillard accepts the Oscar for her role in "La Vie en Rose." <strong>Marion Cotillard (2008):</strong> Marion Cotillard accepts the Oscar for her role in "La Vie en Rose." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesMarion Cotillard (2008): Marion Cotillard accepts the Oscar for her role in “La Vie en Rose.” Hide Caption 81 of 93<strong>Kate Winslet (2009):</strong> Kate Winslet reacts after winning the best actress Oscar for "The Reader." <strong>Kate Winslet (2009):</strong> Kate Winslet reacts after winning the best actress Oscar for "The Reader." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesKate Winslet (2009): Kate Winslet reacts after winning the best actress Oscar for “The Reader.” Hide Caption 82 of 93<strong>Sandra Bullock (2010):</strong> Best actress Sandra Bullock gives her acceptance speech after winning for "The Blind Side."<strong>Sandra Bullock (2010):</strong> Best actress Sandra Bullock gives her acceptance speech after winning for "The Blind Side." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesSandra Bullock (2010): Best actress Sandra Bullock gives her acceptance speech after winning for “The Blind Side.”Hide Caption 83 of 93<strong>Natalie Portman (2011):</strong> Natalie Portman poses in the press room after winning the best actress Oscar for "Black Swan."<strong>Natalie Portman (2011):</strong> Natalie Portman poses in the press room after winning the best actress Oscar for "Black Swan." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesNatalie Portman (2011): Natalie Portman poses in the press room after winning the best actress Oscar for “Black Swan.”Hide Caption 84 of 93<strong>Meryl Streep (2012):</strong> Meryl Streep, right, laughs with Sandra Bullock after Streep's win for her role in "The Iron Lady."<strong>Meryl Streep (2012):</strong> Meryl Streep, right, laughs with Sandra Bullock after Streep's win for her role in "The Iron Lady." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesMeryl Streep (2012): Meryl Streep, right, laughs with Sandra Bullock after Streep’s win for her role in “The Iron Lady.”Hide Caption 85 of 93<strong>Jennifer Lawrence (2013):</strong> Jennifer Lawrence charms the audience in 2013 as she accepts the best actress Oscar for her performance in "Silver Linings Playbook."<strong>Jennifer Lawrence (2013):</strong> Jennifer Lawrence charms the audience in 2013 as she accepts the best actress Oscar for her performance in "Silver Linings Playbook." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJennifer Lawrence (2013): Jennifer Lawrence charms the audience in 2013 as she accepts the best actress Oscar for her performance in “Silver Linings Playbook.”Hide Caption 86 of 93<strong>Cate Blanchett (2014):</strong> Cate Blanchett won an Oscar in 2014 for her turn as a modern-day Blanche DuBois in the Woody Allen film "Blue Jasmine."<strong>Cate Blanchett (2014):</strong> Cate Blanchett won an Oscar in 2014 for her turn as a modern-day Blanche DuBois in the Woody Allen film "Blue Jasmine." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesCate Blanchett (2014): Cate Blanchett won an Oscar in 2014 for her turn as a modern-day Blanche DuBois in the Woody Allen film “Blue Jasmine.”Hide Caption 87 of 93<strong>Julianne Moore (2015):</strong> Matthew McConaughey presents Julianne Moore with the Oscar at the 87th Academy Awards. She won for her role in "Still Alice."<strong>Julianne Moore (2015):</strong> Matthew McConaughey presents Julianne Moore with the Oscar at the 87th Academy Awards. She won for her role in "Still Alice." Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesJulianne Moore (2015): Matthew McConaughey presents Julianne Moore with the Oscar at the 87th Academy Awards. She won for her role in “Still Alice.”Hide Caption 88 of 93<strong>Brie Larson (2016):</strong> Brie Larson accepts the best actress award for her role in "Room." She portrayed a woman held captive with her young son.<strong>Brie Larson (2016):</strong> Brie Larson accepts the best actress award for her role in "Room." She portrayed a woman held captive with her young son. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesBrie Larson (2016): Brie Larson accepts the best actress award for her role in “Room.” She portrayed a woman held captive with her young son.Hide Caption 89 of 93<strong>Emma Stone (2017):</strong> Emma Stone accepts the award for her role in the musical "La La Land," which was nominated for 14 Oscars and won six of them.<strong>Emma Stone (2017):</strong> Emma Stone accepts the award for her role in the musical "La La Land," which was nominated for 14 Oscars and won six of them. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesEmma Stone (2017): Emma Stone accepts the award for her role in the musical “La La Land,” which was nominated for 14 Oscars and won six of them.Hide Caption 90 of 93<strong>Frances McDormand (2018):</strong> For her role in the film "Three Billboard Outside Ebbing, Missouri," McDormand won her second Oscar for best actress. She won her first in 1997 ("Fargo"). During her acceptance speech in 2018, McDormand asked all the women nominees in the room to stand up with her. "We all have stories to tell and projects to be financed," she said. <strong>Frances McDormand (2018):</strong> For her role in the film "Three Billboard Outside Ebbing, Missouri," McDormand won her second Oscar for best actress. She won her first in 1997 ("Fargo"). During her acceptance speech in 2018, McDormand asked all the women nominees in the room to stand up with her. "We all have stories to tell and projects to be financed," she said. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesFrances McDormand (2018): For her role in the film “Three Billboard Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” McDormand won her second Oscar for best actress. She won her first in 1997 (“Fargo”). During her acceptance speech in 2018, McDormand asked all the women nominees in the room to stand up with her. “We all have stories to tell and projects to be financed,” she said. Hide Caption 91 of 93<strong>Olivia Colman (2019):</strong> Colman, who won for her portrayal of Britain's Queen Anne in the black comedy "The Favourite," appeared stunned -- and, to be fair, most viewers were too -- when her name was read out by fellow actress Frances McDormand. "This is hilarious, I've got an Oscar," said Colman, fighting back tears.<strong>Olivia Colman (2019):</strong> Colman, who won for her portrayal of Britain's Queen Anne in the black comedy "The Favourite," appeared stunned -- and, to be fair, most viewers were too -- when her name was read out by fellow actress Frances McDormand. "This is hilarious, I've got an Oscar," said Colman, fighting back tears. Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesOlivia Colman (2019): Colman, who won for her portrayal of Britain’s Queen Anne in the black comedy “The Favourite,” appeared stunned — and, to be fair, most viewers were too — when her name was read out by fellow actress Frances McDormand. “This is hilarious, I’ve got an Oscar,” said Colman, fighting back tears.Hide Caption 92 of 93<strong>Renée Zellweger (2020):</strong> Zellweger won for her portrayal of actress Judy Garland in "Judy". With her win, she became the seventh female performer in history to have wins in both the lead and supporting actress categories. Zellweger won best supporting actress in 2004 ("Cold Mountain").<strong>Renée Zellweger (2020):</strong> Zellweger won for her portrayal of actress Judy Garland in "Judy". With her win, she became the seventh female performer in history to have wins in both the lead and supporting actress categories. Zellweger won best supporting actress in 2004 ("Cold Mountain"). Photos: Oscar-winning best actressesRenée Zellweger (2020): Zellweger won for her portrayal of actress Judy Garland in “Judy”. With her win, she became the seventh female performer in history to have wins in both the lead and supporting actress categories. Zellweger won best supporting actress in 2004 (“Cold Mountain”).Hide Caption 93 of 9301 oscar best actress RESTRICTED02 oscar best actress RESTRICTED03 oscar best actress RESTRICTED04 oscar best actress RESTRICTED05 oscar best actress RESTRICTED06 oscar best actress 07 oscar best actress08 oscar best actress RESTRICTED09 oscar best actress 10 oscar best actress RESTRICTED11 oscar best actress RESTRICTED12 oscar best actress RESTRICTED13 oscar best actress 14 oscar best actress RESTRICTED15 oscar best actress RESTRICTED16 oscar best actress17 oscar best actress18 oscar best actress19 oscar best actress RESTRICTED21 oscar best actor 21 oscar best actress 22 oscar best actress RESTRICTED23 oscar best actress RESTRICTED24 oscar best actress 25 oscar best actress RESTRICTED26 oscar best actress 27 oscar best actress 28 oscar best actress29 oscar best actress 30 oscar best actress RESTRICTED31 oscar best actress32 oscar best actress RESTRICTED33 oscar best actress34 oscar best actress35 oscar best actress RESTRICTED36 oscar best actress 37 oscar best actress 38 oscar best actress 39 oscar best actress 40 oscar best actress 41 oscar best actress RESTRICTED42 oscar best actress43 oscar best actress RESTRICTED44 oscar best actress 45 oscar best actress RESTRICTED46 oscar best actress RESTRICTED47 oscar best actress 48 oscar best actress49 oscar best actress RESTRICTED50 oscar best actress RESTRICTED51 oscar best actress 52 oscar best actress RESTRICTED53 oscar best actress RESTRICTED54 oscar best actress RESTRICTED55 oscar best actress RESTRICTED56 oscar best actress RESTRICTED57 oscar best actress RESTRICTED58 oscar best actress RESTRICTED59 oscar best actress RESTRICTED60 oscar best actress RESTRICTED61 oscar best actress RESTRICTED62 oscar best actress RESTRICTED63 oscar best actress64 oscar best actress RESTRICTED65 oscar best actress RESTRICTED66 oscar best actress 67 oscar best actress RESTRICTED68 oscar best actress 69 oscar best actress 70 oscar best actress71 oscar best actress72 oscar best actress73 oscar best actress 74 oscar best actress75 oscar best actress 76 oscar best actress 77 oscar best actress 78 oscar best actress 79 oscar best actress 80 oscar best actress 81 oscar best actress82 oscar best actress83 oscar best actress84 oscar best actress85 oscar best actress86 oscar best actresscate blanchett wins 12 oscars moments 201501 brie larson 022933 oscars show 201701 Frances McDormand oscar 030418 oscars show 201957 oscars show 2020 Oscar speeches that seized the moment Oscar speeches that seized the moment Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the moment"...This moment is so much bigger than me. This moment is for Dorothy Dandridge, Lena Horne, Diahann Carroll. It's for the women that stand beside me, Jada Pinkett, Angela Bassett, Vivica Fox. And it's for every nameless, faceless woman of color that now has a chance because this door tonight has been opened..." -- Halle Berry, accepting the best leading actress award for her work in "Monsters Ball" at the 74th Academy Awards on March 24, 2002 at the Kodak Theater"...This moment is so much bigger than me. This moment is for Dorothy Dandridge, Lena Horne, Diahann Carroll. It's for the women that stand beside me, Jada Pinkett, Angela Bassett, Vivica Fox. And it's for every nameless, faceless woman of color that now has a chance because this door tonight has been opened..." -- Halle Berry, accepting the best leading actress award for her work in "Monsters Ball" at the 74th Academy Awards on March 24, 2002 at the Kodak Theater Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentHalle Berry (2002) – “…This moment is so much bigger than me. This moment is for Dorothy Dandridge, Lena Horne, Diahann Carroll. It’s for the women that stand beside me, Jada Pinkett, Angela Bassett, Vivica Fox. And it’s for every nameless, faceless woman of color that now has a chance because this door tonight has been opened…” — Halle Berry, accepting the best leading actress award for her work in “Monsters Ball” at the 74th Academy Awards on March 24, 2002 at the Kodak TheaterHide Caption 1 of 20"...I'd like to accept this trophy in the name of all those thousands of disabled veterans who are laying in hospitals all over the country." -- Actor Harold Russell, accepting a special award at the 19th Academy Awards on March 13,1947. Russell, a disabled veteran of World War II, won two awards that night -- one for his performance in the 1946 movie ''The Best Years of Our Lives" and an honorary statue. "...I'd like to accept this trophy in the name of all those thousands of disabled veterans who are laying in hospitals all over the country." -- Actor Harold Russell, accepting a special award at the 19th Academy Awards on March 13,1947. Russell, a disabled veteran of World War II, won two awards that night -- one for his performance in the 1946 movie ''The Best Years of Our Lives" and an honorary statue. Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentHarold Russell (1947) – “…I’d like to accept this trophy in the name of all those thousands of disabled veterans who are laying in hospitals all over the country.” — Actor Harold Russell, accepting a special award at the 19th Academy Awards on March 13,1947. Russell, a disabled veteran of World War II, won two awards that night — one for his performance in the 1946 movie ”The Best Years of Our Lives” and an honorary statue. Hide Caption 2 of 20"Hello. My name is Sacheen Littlefeather. I'm Apache and I am president of the National Native American Affirmative Image Committee. I'm representing Marlon Brando this evening and he has asked me to tell you in a very long speech, which I cannot share with you presently because of time but I will be glad to share with the press afterwards, that he very regretfully cannot accept this very generous award. And the reasons for this being are the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry ... and on television in movie reruns, and also with recent happenings at Wounded Knee...." -- Sacheen Littlefeather (aka Marie Cruz), declining the best actor award at the 45th Academy Awards on behalf of Marlon Brando on March 27, 1973 at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion"Hello. My name is Sacheen Littlefeather. I'm Apache and I am president of the National Native American Affirmative Image Committee. I'm representing Marlon Brando this evening and he has asked me to tell you in a very long speech, which I cannot share with you presently because of time but I will be glad to share with the press afterwards, that he very regretfully cannot accept this very generous award. And the reasons for this being are the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry ... and on television in movie reruns, and also with recent happenings at Wounded Knee...." -- Sacheen Littlefeather (aka Marie Cruz), declining the best actor award at the 45th Academy Awards on behalf of Marlon Brando on March 27, 1973 at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentSacheen Littlefeather (aka Marie Cruz), accepting on behalf of Marlon Brando (1973) – “Hello. My name is Sacheen Littlefeather. I’m Apache and I am president of the National Native American Affirmative Image Committee. I’m representing Marlon Brando this evening and he has asked me to tell you in a very long speech, which I cannot share with you presently because of time but I will be glad to share with the press afterwards, that he very regretfully cannot accept this very generous award. And the reasons for this being are the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry … and on television in movie reruns, and also with recent happenings at Wounded Knee….” — Sacheen Littlefeather (aka Marie Cruz), declining the best actor award at the 45th Academy Awards on behalf of Marlon Brando on March 27, 1973 at Dorothy Chandler PavilionHide Caption 3 of 20"...It is ironic that we are here at a time just before Vietnam is about to be liberated. I will now read a short wire that I have been asked to read by the Vietnamese people. It is sent by Ambassador Dinh Ba Thi, who is the chief of the Provisional Revolutionary Government's delegation to Paris, the Paris political talks. It says: 'Please transmit to all our friends in America our recognition of all that they have done on behalf of peace and for the application of the Paris Accords on Vietnam. These actions serve the legitimate interest of the American people and the Vietnamese people. Greetings of friendship to all the American people.' Thank you very much." -- Burt Schneider (pictured, right), accepting the best documentary feature award for his work on "Hearts and Minds" at the 47th Academy Awards on April 8, 1975 at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion <br />"...It is ironic that we are here at a time just before Vietnam is about to be liberated. I will now read a short wire that I have been asked to read by the Vietnamese people. It is sent by Ambassador Dinh Ba Thi, who is the chief of the Provisional Revolutionary Government's delegation to Paris, the Paris political talks. It says: 'Please transmit to all our friends in America our recognition of all that they have done on behalf of peace and for the application of the Paris Accords on Vietnam. These actions serve the legitimate interest of the American people and the Vietnamese people. Greetings of friendship to all the American people.' Thank you very much." -- Burt Schneider (pictured, right), accepting the best documentary feature award for his work on "Hearts and Minds" at the 47th Academy Awards on April 8, 1975 at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion <br /> Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentPeter Davis and Burt Schneider (1975) – “…It is ironic that we are here at a time just before Vietnam is about to be liberated. I will now read a short wire that I have been asked to read by the Vietnamese people. It is sent by Ambassador Dinh Ba Thi, who is the chief of the Provisional Revolutionary Government’s delegation to Paris, the Paris political talks. It says: ‘Please transmit to all our friends in America our recognition of all that they have done on behalf of peace and for the application of the Paris Accords on Vietnam. These actions serve the legitimate interest of the American people and the Vietnamese people. Greetings of friendship to all the American people.’ Thank you very much.” — Burt Schneider (pictured, right), accepting the best documentary feature award for his work on “Hearts and Minds” at the 47th Academy Awards on April 8, 1975 at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Hide Caption 4 of 20"...Two, out of millions, who gave their lives and were prepared to sacrifice everything in the fight against fascist and racist Nazi Germany. And I salute you and I pay tribute to you and I think you should be very proud that in the last few weeks you've stood firm and you have refused to be intimidated by the threats of a small bunch of Zionist hoodlums whose behavior is an insult to the stature of Jews all over the world and to their great and heroic record of struggle against fascism and oppression. And I salute that record, and I salute all of you for having stood firm and dealt a final blow against that period when Nixon and McCarthy launched a worldwide witch hunt against those who tried to express in their lives and their work the truth that they believed in. I salute you, and I thank you, and I pledge to you that I will continue to fight against anti-Semitism and fascism." -- Vanessa Redgrave, accepting the best supporting actress award for her role in "Julia" at the 50th Academy Awards on April 3, 1978 at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion"...Two, out of millions, who gave their lives and were prepared to sacrifice everything in the fight against fascist and racist Nazi Germany. And I salute you and I pay tribute to you and I think you should be very proud that in the last few weeks you've stood firm and you have refused to be intimidated by the threats of a small bunch of Zionist hoodlums whose behavior is an insult to the stature of Jews all over the world and to their great and heroic record of struggle against fascism and oppression. And I salute that record, and I salute all of you for having stood firm and dealt a final blow against that period when Nixon and McCarthy launched a worldwide witch hunt against those who tried to express in their lives and their work the truth that they believed in. I salute you, and I thank you, and I pledge to you that I will continue to fight against anti-Semitism and fascism." -- Vanessa Redgrave, accepting the best supporting actress award for her role in "Julia" at the 50th Academy Awards on April 3, 1978 at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentVanessa Redgrave (1978) – “…Two, out of millions, who gave their lives and were prepared to sacrifice everything in the fight against fascist and racist Nazi Germany. And I salute you and I pay tribute to you and I think you should be very proud that in the last few weeks you’ve stood firm and you have refused to be intimidated by the threats of a small bunch of Zionist hoodlums whose behavior is an insult to the stature of Jews all over the world and to their great and heroic record of struggle against fascism and oppression. And I salute that record, and I salute all of you for having stood firm and dealt a final blow against that period when Nixon and McCarthy launched a worldwide witch hunt against those who tried to express in their lives and their work the truth that they believed in. I salute you, and I thank you, and I pledge to you that I will continue to fight against anti-Semitism and fascism.” — Vanessa Redgrave, accepting the best supporting actress award for her role in “Julia” at the 50th Academy Awards on April 3, 1978 at Dorothy Chandler PavilionHide Caption 5 of 20"[Speaking simultaneously in sign language:] I'm so happy. I wanted to win very much because I'm so proud of "Coming Home," and I want many people to see the movie. I'm signing part of what I'm saying tonight because, while we were making the movie, we all became more aware of the problems of the handicapped. Over 14 million people are deaf. They are the invisible handicapped and can't share this evening, so this is my way of acknowledging them...." -- Jane Fonda, accepting the best leading actress award for her role in "Coming Home" at the 51st Academy Awards on April 9, 1979 at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion<br />"[Speaking simultaneously in sign language:] I'm so happy. I wanted to win very much because I'm so proud of "Coming Home," and I want many people to see the movie. I'm signing part of what I'm saying tonight because, while we were making the movie, we all became more aware of the problems of the handicapped. Over 14 million people are deaf. They are the invisible handicapped and can't share this evening, so this is my way of acknowledging them...." -- Jane Fonda, accepting the best leading actress award for her role in "Coming Home" at the 51st Academy Awards on April 9, 1979 at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion<br /> Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentJane Fonda (1979) – “[Speaking simultaneously in sign language:] I’m so happy. I wanted to win very much because I’m so proud of “Coming Home,” and I want many people to see the movie. I’m signing part of what I’m saying tonight because, while we were making the movie, we all became more aware of the problems of the handicapped. Over 14 million people are deaf. They are the invisible handicapped and can’t share this evening, so this is my way of acknowledging them….” — Jane Fonda, accepting the best leading actress award for her role in “Coming Home” at the 51st Academy Awards on April 9, 1979 at Dorothy Chandler PavilionHide Caption 6 of 20"...I think that through this award you're really acknowledging the Vietnam veteran. And I think what you're saying is that for the first time, you really understand what happened over there. And I think what you're saying is that it should never, ever in our lifetimes happen again. And if it does, then those American boys died over there for nothing, because America learned nothing from the Vietnam War." -- Oliver Stone, accepting the best director award for his work on "Platoon" at the 59th Academy Awards on March 30, 1987 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion "...I think that through this award you're really acknowledging the Vietnam veteran. And I think what you're saying is that for the first time, you really understand what happened over there. And I think what you're saying is that it should never, ever in our lifetimes happen again. And if it does, then those American boys died over there for nothing, because America learned nothing from the Vietnam War." -- Oliver Stone, accepting the best director award for his work on "Platoon" at the 59th Academy Awards on March 30, 1987 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentOliver Stone (1987) – “…I think that through this award you’re really acknowledging the Vietnam veteran. And I think what you’re saying is that for the first time, you really understand what happened over there. And I think what you’re saying is that it should never, ever in our lifetimes happen again. And if it does, then those American boys died over there for nothing, because America learned nothing from the Vietnam War.” — Oliver Stone, accepting the best director award for his work on “Platoon” at the 59th Academy Awards on March 30, 1987 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Hide Caption 7 of 20"...I know that my work in this case is magnified by the fact that the streets of heaven are too crowded with angels. We know their names. They number a thousand for each one of the red ribbons that we wear here tonight. They finally rest in the warm embrace of the gracious creator of us all. A healing embrace that cools their fevers, that clears their skin, and allows their eyes to see the simple, self-evident, common sense truth that is made manifest by the benevolent creator of us all and was written down on paper by wise men, tolerant men, in the city of Philadelphia two hundred years ago. God bless you all. God have mercy on us all. And God bless America." -- Tom Hanks, accepting the best actor award for his role in "Philadelphia" at the 66th Academy Awards on March 21, 1994 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion"...I know that my work in this case is magnified by the fact that the streets of heaven are too crowded with angels. We know their names. They number a thousand for each one of the red ribbons that we wear here tonight. They finally rest in the warm embrace of the gracious creator of us all. A healing embrace that cools their fevers, that clears their skin, and allows their eyes to see the simple, self-evident, common sense truth that is made manifest by the benevolent creator of us all and was written down on paper by wise men, tolerant men, in the city of Philadelphia two hundred years ago. God bless you all. God have mercy on us all. And God bless America." -- Tom Hanks, accepting the best actor award for his role in "Philadelphia" at the 66th Academy Awards on March 21, 1994 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentTom Hanks (1994) – “…I know that my work in this case is magnified by the fact that the streets of heaven are too crowded with angels. We know their names. They number a thousand for each one of the red ribbons that we wear here tonight. They finally rest in the warm embrace of the gracious creator of us all. A healing embrace that cools their fevers, that clears their skin, and allows their eyes to see the simple, self-evident, common sense truth that is made manifest by the benevolent creator of us all and was written down on paper by wise men, tolerant men, in the city of Philadelphia two hundred years ago. God bless you all. God have mercy on us all. And God bless America.” — Tom Hanks, accepting the best actor award for his role in “Philadelphia” at the 66th Academy Awards on March 21, 1994 at the Dorothy Chandler PavilionHide Caption 8 of 20"...I have been in a place for six incredible years where winning meant a crust of bread and to live another day. Since the blessed day of my liberation I have asked the question, why am I here? I am no better. In my mind's eye I see those years and days and those who never lived to see the magic of a boring evening at home. On their behalf I wish to thank you for honoring their memory, and you cannot do it in any better way than when you return to your homes tonight to realize that each of you who know the joy of freedom are winners." -- Gerda Weissmann Klein, the subject of documentary short winner "One Survivor Remembers." She spoke on stage with winner Kary Atholis at the 68th Academy Awards on March 25, 1996 at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion"...I have been in a place for six incredible years where winning meant a crust of bread and to live another day. Since the blessed day of my liberation I have asked the question, why am I here? I am no better. In my mind's eye I see those years and days and those who never lived to see the magic of a boring evening at home. On their behalf I wish to thank you for honoring their memory, and you cannot do it in any better way than when you return to your homes tonight to realize that each of you who know the joy of freedom are winners." -- Gerda Weissmann Klein, the subject of documentary short winner "One Survivor Remembers." She spoke on stage with winner Kary Atholis at the 68th Academy Awards on March 25, 1996 at Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentGerda Weissmann Klein, on stage with Kary Atholis (1996) – “…I have been in a place for six incredible years where winning meant a crust of bread and to live another day. Since the blessed day of my liberation I have asked the question, why am I here? I am no better. In my mind’s eye I see those years and days and those who never lived to see the magic of a boring evening at home. On their behalf I wish to thank you for honoring their memory, and you cannot do it in any better way than when you return to your homes tonight to realize that each of you who know the joy of freedom are winners.” — Gerda Weissmann Klein, the subject of documentary short winner “One Survivor Remembers.” She spoke on stage with winner Kary Atholis at the 68th Academy Awards on March 25, 1996 at Dorothy Chandler PavilionHide Caption 9 of 20"...I want to thank the Academy for this honor to a film on the abortion subject and Miramax for having the courage to make this movie in the first place....and everyone at Planned Parenthood and the National Abortion Rights League." -- John Irving, accepting the best adapted screenplay award for his work on "The Cider House Rules" at the 72nd Academy Awards on March 26, 2000 at the Shrine Auditorium & Expo Center"...I want to thank the Academy for this honor to a film on the abortion subject and Miramax for having the courage to make this movie in the first place....and everyone at Planned Parenthood and the National Abortion Rights League." -- John Irving, accepting the best adapted screenplay award for his work on "The Cider House Rules" at the 72nd Academy Awards on March 26, 2000 at the Shrine Auditorium & Expo Center Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentJohn Irving (2000) – “…I want to thank the Academy for this honor to a film on the abortion subject and Miramax for having the courage to make this movie in the first place….and everyone at Planned Parenthood and the National Abortion Rights League.” — John Irving, accepting the best adapted screenplay award for his work on “The Cider House Rules” at the 72nd Academy Awards on March 26, 2000 at the Shrine Auditorium & Expo CenterHide Caption 10 of 20"I've invited my fellow documentary nominees on the stage with us, and we would like to--they are here in solidarity with me because we like nonfiction. We like nonfiction and we live in fictitious times. We live in the time where we have fictitious election results that elects a fictitious president. We live in a time where we have a man sending us to war for fictitious reasons, whether it's the fiction of duct tape or the fictitious of orange alerts. We are against this war, Mr. Bush! Shame on you, Mr. Bush! Shame on you! And any time you've got the Pope and the Dixie Chicks against you, your time is up!" -- Michael Moore, accepting the best documentary feature award for his work on "Bowlng for Columbine" at the 75th Academy Awards on March 23, 2003 at the Kodak Theatre"I've invited my fellow documentary nominees on the stage with us, and we would like to--they are here in solidarity with me because we like nonfiction. We like nonfiction and we live in fictitious times. We live in the time where we have fictitious election results that elects a fictitious president. We live in a time where we have a man sending us to war for fictitious reasons, whether it's the fiction of duct tape or the fictitious of orange alerts. We are against this war, Mr. Bush! Shame on you, Mr. Bush! Shame on you! And any time you've got the Pope and the Dixie Chicks against you, your time is up!" -- Michael Moore, accepting the best documentary feature award for his work on "Bowlng for Columbine" at the 75th Academy Awards on March 23, 2003 at the Kodak Theatre Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentMichael Moore (2003) – “I’ve invited my fellow documentary nominees on the stage with us, and we would like to–they are here in solidarity with me because we like nonfiction. We like nonfiction and we live in fictitious times. We live in the time where we have fictitious election results that elects a fictitious president. We live in a time where we have a man sending us to war for fictitious reasons, whether it’s the fiction of duct tape or the fictitious of orange alerts. We are against this war, Mr. Bush! Shame on you, Mr. Bush! Shame on you! And any time you’ve got the Pope and the Dixie Chicks against you, your time is up!” — Michael Moore, accepting the best documentary feature award for his work on “Bowlng for Columbine” at the 75th Academy Awards on March 23, 2003 at the Kodak TheatreHide Caption 11 of 20"...For those who saw the signs of hatred as our cars drove in tonight, I think that it is a good time for those who voted for the ban against gay marriage to sit and reflect and anticipate their great shame and the shame in their grandchildren's eyes if they continue that way of support. We've got to have equal rights for everyone." -- Sean Penn, accepting the best actor in a leading role award for his role in "Milk" at the 81st Academy Awards on February 22, 2009 at the Kodak Theater<br />"...For those who saw the signs of hatred as our cars drove in tonight, I think that it is a good time for those who voted for the ban against gay marriage to sit and reflect and anticipate their great shame and the shame in their grandchildren's eyes if they continue that way of support. We've got to have equal rights for everyone." -- Sean Penn, accepting the best actor in a leading role award for his role in "Milk" at the 81st Academy Awards on February 22, 2009 at the Kodak Theater<br /> Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentSean Penn (2009) – “…For those who saw the signs of hatred as our cars drove in tonight, I think that it is a good time for those who voted for the ban against gay marriage to sit and reflect and anticipate their great shame and the shame in their grandchildren’s eyes if they continue that way of support. We’ve got to have equal rights for everyone.” — Sean Penn, accepting the best actor in a leading role award for his role in “Milk” at the 81st Academy Awards on February 22, 2009 at the Kodak TheaterHide Caption 12 of 20When Louie Psihoyos and Fisher Stevens won the best documentary feature award for "The Cove" at the 82nd Academy Awards on March 7, 2010, they were accompanied on stage by producer Paula DuPré Pesmen and film subject Ric O'Barry. O'Barry walked on stage carrying a sign that prompted the audience to text for more information on how to help curtail the dolphin slaughter depicted in the film.When Louie Psihoyos and Fisher Stevens won the best documentary feature award for "The Cove" at the 82nd Academy Awards on March 7, 2010, they were accompanied on stage by producer Paula DuPré Pesmen and film subject Ric O'Barry. O'Barry walked on stage carrying a sign that prompted the audience to text for more information on how to help curtail the dolphin slaughter depicted in the film. Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the moment'The Cove' (2010) – When Louie Psihoyos and Fisher Stevens won the best documentary feature award for “The Cove” at the 82nd Academy Awards on March 7, 2010, they were accompanied on stage by producer Paula DuPré Pesmen and film subject Ric O’Barry. O’Barry walked on stage carrying a sign that prompted the audience to text for more information on how to help curtail the dolphin slaughter depicted in the film.Hide Caption 13 of 20"I must start by pointing out that three years after a horrific financial crisis caused by massive fraud not a single financial executive has gone to jail, and that's wrong...." -- Charles Ferguson, accepting the best documentary feature award for his work on "Inside Job" at the 83rd Academy Awards on February 27, 2011 at the Kodak theater"I must start by pointing out that three years after a horrific financial crisis caused by massive fraud not a single financial executive has gone to jail, and that's wrong...." -- Charles Ferguson, accepting the best documentary feature award for his work on "Inside Job" at the 83rd Academy Awards on February 27, 2011 at the Kodak theater Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentCharles Ferguson (2011) – “I must start by pointing out that three years after a horrific financial crisis caused by massive fraud not a single financial executive has gone to jail, and that’s wrong….” — Charles Ferguson, accepting the best documentary feature award for his work on “Inside Job” at the 83rd Academy Awards on February 27, 2011 at the Kodak theaterHide Caption 14 of 20"...This is for the 36 million people who have lost the battle to AIDS. And to those of you out there who have ever felt injustice because of who you are or who you love, tonight I stand here in front of the world with you and for you." -- Jared Leto, accepting the best actor in a supporting role award for his role in "Dallas Buyers Club" at the 86th Academy Awards on March 2, 2014 at the Dolby Theater"...This is for the 36 million people who have lost the battle to AIDS. And to those of you out there who have ever felt injustice because of who you are or who you love, tonight I stand here in front of the world with you and for you." -- Jared Leto, accepting the best actor in a supporting role award for his role in "Dallas Buyers Club" at the 86th Academy Awards on March 2, 2014 at the Dolby Theater Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentJared Leto (2014) – “…This is for the 36 million people who have lost the battle to AIDS. And to those of you out there who have ever felt injustice because of who you are or who you love, tonight I stand here in front of the world with you and for you.” — Jared Leto, accepting the best actor in a supporting role award for his role in “Dallas Buyers Club” at the 86th Academy Awards on March 2, 2014 at the Dolby TheaterHide Caption 15 of 20"...Alan Turing never got to stand on a stage like this and look out at all of these disconcertingly attractive faces, and I do. And that's the most unfair thing I think I've ever heard. So, in this brief time here, what I want to use it to do is to say this: When I was sixteen years old I tried to kill myself, because I felt weird and I felt different and I felt like I did not belong. And now I'm standing here. And so I would like for this moment to be for that kid out there who feels like she's weird or she's different or she doesn't fit in anywhere. Yes, you do. I promise you do. You do. Stay weird. Stay different. And then when it's your turn and you are standing on this stage, please pass the same message to the next person who comes along." -- Graham Moore, accepting the best adapted screenplay award for his work on "The Imitation Game" at the 87th Academy Awards on February 22, 2015 at the Dolby Theatre"...Alan Turing never got to stand on a stage like this and look out at all of these disconcertingly attractive faces, and I do. And that's the most unfair thing I think I've ever heard. So, in this brief time here, what I want to use it to do is to say this: When I was sixteen years old I tried to kill myself, because I felt weird and I felt different and I felt like I did not belong. And now I'm standing here. And so I would like for this moment to be for that kid out there who feels like she's weird or she's different or she doesn't fit in anywhere. Yes, you do. I promise you do. You do. Stay weird. Stay different. And then when it's your turn and you are standing on this stage, please pass the same message to the next person who comes along." -- Graham Moore, accepting the best adapted screenplay award for his work on "The Imitation Game" at the 87th Academy Awards on February 22, 2015 at the Dolby Theatre Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentGraham Moore (2015) – “…Alan Turing never got to stand on a stage like this and look out at all of these disconcertingly attractive faces, and I do. And that’s the most unfair thing I think I’ve ever heard. So, in this brief time here, what I want to use it to do is to say this: When I was sixteen years old I tried to kill myself, because I felt weird and I felt different and I felt like I did not belong. And now I’m standing here. And so I would like for this moment to be for that kid out there who feels like she’s weird or she’s different or she doesn’t fit in anywhere. Yes, you do. I promise you do. You do. Stay weird. Stay different. And then when it’s your turn and you are standing on this stage, please pass the same message to the next person who comes along.” — Graham Moore, accepting the best adapted screenplay award for his work on “The Imitation Game” at the 87th Academy Awards on February 22, 2015 at the Dolby TheatreHide Caption 16 of 20"...To every woman who gave birth. To every taxpayer and citizen of this nation, we have fought for everybody else's equal rights. It's our time to have wage equality once and for all and equal rights for women in the United States of America." -- Patricia Arquette, accepting the best supporting actress award for her role in "Boyhood" at the 87th Academy Awards on February 22, 2015 at Dolby Theater "...To every woman who gave birth. To every taxpayer and citizen of this nation, we have fought for everybody else's equal rights. It's our time to have wage equality once and for all and equal rights for women in the United States of America." -- Patricia Arquette, accepting the best supporting actress award for her role in "Boyhood" at the 87th Academy Awards on February 22, 2015 at Dolby Theater Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentPatricia Arquette (2015) – “…To every woman who gave birth. To every taxpayer and citizen of this nation, we have fought for everybody else’s equal rights. It’s our time to have wage equality once and for all and equal rights for women in the United States of America.” — Patricia Arquette, accepting the best supporting actress award for her role in “Boyhood” at the 87th Academy Awards on February 22, 2015 at Dolby Theater Hide Caption 17 of 20"Nina Simone said it's an artist's duty to reflect the times in which we live. We wrote this song for a film that was based on events that were fifty years ago, but we say that 'Selma' is now because the struggle for justice is right now. We know that the Voting Rights Act that they fought for fifty years ago is being compromised right now in this country today. We know that right now the struggle for freedom and justice is real. We live in the most incarcerated country in the world. There are more black men under correctional control today than were under slavery in 1850. When people are marching with our song, we want to tell you we are with you, we see you, we love you, and march on." -- John Legend, accepting the best original song award with Common for their work on "Selma" at the 87th Academy Awards on February 22, 2015 at the Dolby Theater"Nina Simone said it's an artist's duty to reflect the times in which we live. We wrote this song for a film that was based on events that were fifty years ago, but we say that 'Selma' is now because the struggle for justice is right now. We know that the Voting Rights Act that they fought for fifty years ago is being compromised right now in this country today. We know that right now the struggle for freedom and justice is real. We live in the most incarcerated country in the world. There are more black men under correctional control today than were under slavery in 1850. When people are marching with our song, we want to tell you we are with you, we see you, we love you, and march on." -- John Legend, accepting the best original song award with Common for their work on "Selma" at the 87th Academy Awards on February 22, 2015 at the Dolby Theater Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the moment”Nina Simone said it’s an artist’s duty to reflect the times in which we live. We wrote this song for a film that was based on events that were fifty years ago, but we say that ‘Selma’ is now because the struggle for justice is right now. We know that the Voting Rights Act that they fought for fifty years ago is being compromised right now in this country today. We know that right now the struggle for freedom and justice is real. We live in the most incarcerated country in the world. There are more black men under correctional control today than were under slavery in 1850. When people are marching with our song, we want to tell you we are with you, we see you, we love you, and march on.” — John Legend, accepting the best original song award with Common for their work on “Selma” at the 87th Academy Awards on February 22, 2015 at the Dolby TheaterHide Caption 18 of 20"...I'm so happy, I'm thrilled, actually, that we were able to hopefully shine a light on Alzheimer's disease. So many people with this disease feel isolated and marginalized, and one of the wonderful things about movies is it makes us feel seen and not alone. And people with Alzheimer's deserve to be seen, so that we can find a cure...." -- Julianne Moore, accepting the best actress award for her role in "Still Alice" at the 87th Academy Awards on February 22, 2015 at the Dolby Theater"...I'm so happy, I'm thrilled, actually, that we were able to hopefully shine a light on Alzheimer's disease. So many people with this disease feel isolated and marginalized, and one of the wonderful things about movies is it makes us feel seen and not alone. And people with Alzheimer's deserve to be seen, so that we can find a cure...." -- Julianne Moore, accepting the best actress award for her role in "Still Alice" at the 87th Academy Awards on February 22, 2015 at the Dolby Theater Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the momentJulianne Moore (2015) – “…I’m so happy, I’m thrilled, actually, that we were able to hopefully shine a light on Alzheimer’s disease. So many people with this disease feel isolated and marginalized, and one of the wonderful things about movies is it makes us feel seen and not alone. And people with Alzheimer’s deserve to be seen, so that we can find a cure….” — Julianne Moore, accepting the best actress award for her role in “Still Alice” at the 87th Academy Awards on February 22, 2015 at the Dolby TheaterHide Caption 19 of 20"...Climate change is real. It is happening right now. It is the most urgent threat facing our entire species and we need to work collectively together and stop procrastinating. We need to support leaders around the world who do not speak for the big polluters or the big corporations, but who speak for all of humanity. For the indigenous people of the world. For the billions and billions of underprivileged people who will be most affected by this. For our children's children. And for those people out there whose voices have been drowned out by the politics of greed. I thank you all for this amazing award tonight. Let us not take this planet for granted. I do not take tonight for granted." -- Leonardo DiCaprio, accepting the best leading actor award for his role in "The Revenant" at the 88th Academy Awards on February 28, 2016 at the Dolby Theater "...Climate change is real. It is happening right now. It is the most urgent threat facing our entire species and we need to work collectively together and stop procrastinating. We need to support leaders around the world who do not speak for the big polluters or the big corporations, but who speak for all of humanity. For the indigenous people of the world. For the billions and billions of underprivileged people who will be most affected by this. For our children's children. And for those people out there whose voices have been drowned out by the politics of greed. I thank you all for this amazing award tonight. Let us not take this planet for granted. I do not take tonight for granted." -- Leonardo DiCaprio, accepting the best leading actor award for his role in "The Revenant" at the 88th Academy Awards on February 28, 2016 at the Dolby Theater Photos: Oscar speeches that seized the moment”…Climate change is real. It is happening right now. It is the most urgent threat facing our entire species and we need to work collectively together and stop procrastinating. We need to support leaders around the world who do not speak for the big polluters or the big corporations, but who speak for all of humanity. For the indigenous people of the world. For the billions and billions of underprivileged people who will be most affected by this. For our children’s children. And for those people out there whose voices have been drowned out by the politics of greed. I thank you all for this amazing award tonight. Let us not take this planet for granted. I do not take tonight for granted.” — Leonardo DiCaprio, accepting the best leading actor award for his role in “The Revenant” at the 88th Academy Awards on February 28, 2016 at the Dolby Theater Hide Caption 20 of 2010 Memorable Oscar speeches 022001 Memorable Oscar speeches 0220 RESTRICTED02 Memorable Oscar speeches 0220 RESTRICTED 03 Memorable Oscar speeches 0220 RESTRICTED 04 Memorable Oscar speeches 0220 RESTRICTED05 Memorable Oscar speeches 0220 RESTRICTED06 Memorable Oscar speeches 0220 RESTRICTED 07 Memorable Oscar speeches 022008 Memorable Oscar Speeches 0220 RESTRICTED 09 Memorable Oscar speeches 022011 Memorable Oscar Speeches 0220 RESTRICTED12 Memorable Oscar Speeches 022013 Memorable Oscar speeches 022014 Memorable Oscar speeches 022015 Memorable Oscar speeches 022016 Memorable Oscar speeches 022017 Memorable Oscar speeches 022018 Memorable Oscar speeches 022019 Memorable Oscar speeches 0220 RESTRICTED 20 Memorable Oscar speeches 0220Other FactsPricewaterhouseCoopers accounting firm has tallied the ballots since 1934. Newspaper headlines announced the winners before the ceremony until 1941, when the sealed envelope system was put in place. Prior to a PwC envelope mix-up in 2017, when an error was made during the award announcement for Best Picture, only two partners from the firm knew the results until the envelopes were opened. After 2017, new procedures were adopted, which include adding a third balloting partner to also memorize the list of winners. The third partner sits with Oscar producers in the control room while the other two balloting partners are posted on opposite sides of the stage. Additionally, the PwC partners are prohibited from using cellphones and social media backstage during the show.Walt Disney is the most honored person in Oscar history. He received 59 nominations and 26 competitive awards throughout his career.Composer John Williams is the most nominated living person – 51 nominations (including 5 wins).Meryl Streep is the most nominated performer in Academy history with 21 nominations.Jack Nicholson is the most nominated male performer in Academy history with 12 nominations.Katharine Hepburn had the most Oscar wins for a performer, with four.Daniel Day-Lewis is the only person to have three Best Actor Oscars.Tatum O’Neal is the youngest person to ever win a competitive Oscar at 10 years, 148 days old.Only three films have won Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Writing: in 1934, “It Happened One Night”; in 1975, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”; and in 1991, “The Silence of the Lambs.”No one film has ever taken home all six top prizes, Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actress.Scientific and Technical Awards are given out in a separate ceremony for methods, discoveries or inventions that contribute to the arts and sciences of motion pictures.TimelineMay 16, 1929 – The first Academy Awards are held in the Blossom Room at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel. Tickets cost $5.1929 – The first Best Picture award goes to “Wings.”1929 – The first statuette ever presented is to Emil Jannings, for his Best Actor performance in “The Last Command.”1937 – The first presentation of the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award is given to Darryl F. Zanuck.1938 – Due to extensive flooding in Los Angeles, the ceremony is delayed for one week.March 19, 1953 – First televised ceremony is from the Pantages Theater in Hollywood.1966 – The awards are first broadcast in color.1968 – Due to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., the ceremony is moved forward two days as the original date is the day of King’s funeral.1976-present – ABC broadcasts the Oscars. 1981 – Due to the assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan, the ceremony is postponed 24 hours.2001 – The Best Animated Feature Film category is added.June 23, 2009 – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announces that beginning in 2010, 10 films will receive nominations in the Best Picture category, instead of five. June 26, 2009 – The Academy announces that beginning in 2010, new rules governing the Best Song category may eliminate that category in any given year. Also, the Irving G. Thalberg and Jean Hersholt honorary awards will be given at a separate ceremony in November.June 14, 2011 – The Academy announces new rules governing the Best Picture category, the number of movies nominated may vary from 5 – 10 in any given year and will not be known until the nominees are announced. The new rule goes into effect in 2012.November 9, 2011 – Eddie Murphy drops out as host of the Oscars in February 2012, one day after producer Brett Ratner quits the show, because of a remark he made that was considered homophobic.January 18, 2016 – Following criticism two years in a row about the lack of diversity with Oscar nominees, Cheryl Boone Isaacs, the president of the Academy, issues a statement saying that “in the coming days and weeks we will conduct a review of our membership recruitment in order to bring about much-needed diversity in our 2016 class and beyond.”January 24, 2017 – The romantic musical, “La La Land,” picks up 14 Oscar nominations, tying the record held by “All About Eve” and “Titanic.” After complaints in 2016 about a lack of diversity, six Black actors receive nominations for their performances, a record.February 26, 2017 – Following the moment “La La Land” is mistakenly announced as best picture, “Moonlight” becomes the first film with an all-Black cast to win the Academy Award for best picture. Additionally, Mahershala Ali is the first Muslim actor to win best supporting actor.August 8, 2018 – In a letter to members, the Academy announces that it is adding a new category in 2019 for outstanding achievement in popular film. The letter doesn’t specify the criteria for a “popular” film. September 6, 2018 – The Academy announces that it is rethinking the decision to add a popular film category. Academy CEO Dawn Hudson says in a statement, “There has been a wide range of reactions to the introduction of a new award, and we recognize the need for further discussion with our members.”December 6, 2018 – Kevin Hart steps down from hosting the Oscars after past homophobic tweets surface. February 5, 2019 – ABC confirms that the Academy Awards will be hostless. This will be the first time in 30 years that the ceremony will be without a host. February 9, 2020 – “Parasite” becomes the first non-English film to win an Oscar for Best Picture. It is also the first film to win both Best International Feature and Best Picture.February 9, 2020 – The 92nd Academy Awards draws an average of 23.6 million views, the lowest ratings in the show’s history.June 15, 2020 – For the first time in 40 years, the Academy postpones the 93rd Oscars. The last time the Oscars were postponed was in 1981, when the ceremony was delayed 24 hours because of an assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan. In addition to the delay, the Academy agrees to extend the eligibility window for films, which usually corresponds to the calendar year. For the 2021 Oscars, the new window will be extended until February 28, 2021.September 8, 2020 – The Academy announces that movies must meet certain criteria in terms of representation in order to be eligible for the Academy Award for best picture beginning in 2024. Introduced under an initiative called Aperture 2025, the organization says the goal is to “encourage equitable representation on and off screen in order to better reflect the diversity of the movie-going audience.”

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