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(CNN)The Bootleg Fire in Oregon has burned more than 360,000 acres and is so big that it’s creating its own weather.

Here’s what you need to know to Get Up to Speed and On with Your Day. (You can also get “5 Things You Need to Know Today” delivered to your inbox daily. Sign up here.)1. CoronavirusOminous signs of a coronavirus backslide are piling up in the US. The American Academy of Pediatrics released new guidance yesterday recommending everyone over the age of 2 wear a mask while in school, regardless of vaccination status. That’s a stricter position than the one the CDC took earlier this month. One reason for the tighter precaution? Many school-aged children are not eligible for a Covid-19 vaccination yet, and recent virus surges have overwhelmingly affected unvaccinated people. The average of new daily cases in the US this week is up 66% from last week and 145% from two weeks ago. The Dow also fell about 725 points yesterday in the biggest drop of the year as Delta variant fears spread to investors. London mayor's biggest problem with eased Covid-19 restrictionsLondon mayor's biggest problem with eased Covid-19 restrictionsLondon mayor's biggest problem with eased Covid-19 restrictionsJUST WATCHEDLondon mayor’s biggest problem with eased Covid-19 restrictionsReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

London mayor’s biggest problem with eased Covid-19 restrictions 01:52Read More 2. CyberattacksThe US and its allies in Europe and Asia have accused China of widespread malfeasance in cyberspace, including through a massive hack of Microsoft’s email system and other ransomware attacks. That’s a significant escalation of the White House’s fight against cyberattacks, but the Biden administration hasn’t yet decided how, or if, it will punish Beijing for these alleged hacks. China called the accusations “politically motivated smears.” Meanwhile, a ​​major law firm with an array of high-profile corporate clients announced it was hit by ransomware in February. Campbell Conroy & O’Neil said the hack may have leaked critical information like Social Security numbers, health insurance information and even biometric data (which can be things like fingerprints). US blames China for hacks, opening new front in cyberoffensiveUS blames China for hacks, opening new front in cyberoffensiveUS blames China for hacks, opening new front in cyberoffensiveJUST WATCHEDUS blames China for hacks, opening new front in cyberoffensiveReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

US blames China for hacks, opening new front in cyberoffensive 03:503. InfrastructurePresident Biden’s much-touted bipartisan infrastructure bill is in peril as Democrats try to muster a united front to pass it in the Senate and Republicans grow impatient with the process. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has set up a test vote tomorrow for the bill. But Senate GOP leaders are threatening to block that vote unless negotiators writing the bill can strike a deal. In June, the White House and a bipartisan Senate group agreed to a $579 billion framework to build roads, bridges, railroads and airports, along with water, power and broadband infrastructure projects. But lawmakers have squabbled over how to pay for it, and the plan has been pared down several times. Senator explains why IRS enforcement was pulled from infrastructure proposalSenator explains why IRS enforcement was pulled from infrastructure proposalSenator explains why IRS enforcement was pulled from infrastructure proposalJUST WATCHEDSenator explains why IRS enforcement was pulled from infrastructure proposalReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Senator explains why IRS enforcement was pulled from infrastructure proposal 02:25 4. HaitiHaiti’s acting Prime Minister Claude Joseph has agreed to step down amid a power struggle that has gripped the nation since the shocking July 7 assassination of President Jovenel Moise. Joseph has been negotiating with his political rival Ariel Henry over who should lead. Now, Henry will become prime minister, Joseph will retain his original role as Haiti’s foreign minister and work begins to reform Haiti’s hollowed-out governing bodies. Henry has promised Haitians a new coalition government and is being urged to set up elections as soon as possible. But some activists and civil groups worry that in the current political environment, free and fair elections just aren’t possible.On GPS: Gen Petraeus weighs in on Haiti crisisOn GPS: Gen Petraeus weighs in on Haiti crisisexp GPS 0718 Petraeus Afghanistan Haiti_00001617JUST WATCHEDOn GPS: Gen Petraeus weighs in on Haiti crisisReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

On GPS: Gen Petraeus weighs in on Haiti crisis 04:02 5. Condo collapseSearch crews are reaching the bottom of the wreckage of the collapsed condo building in Surfside, Florida, but they say they won’t stop until every victim is located. As the community mourns, investigators and structural engineers are preparing to take a hard look at the collapse, which won’t be fully possible until search efforts conclude. Experts say there are several possible theories for how the collapse occurred. The disaster has ignited new fears among other residents in the area — and the roughly 30 million condo residents across the country — about the structural integrity of their buildings.Condo owners across country feel uneasy after Surfside collapseCondo owners across country feel uneasy after Surfside collapseCondo owners across country feel uneasy after Surfside collapseJUST WATCHEDCondo owners across country feel uneasy after Surfside collapseReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Condo owners across country feel uneasy after Surfside collapse 04:37BREAKFAST BROWSEMost romantic relationships start as friendships, study findsIf you’re looking for some courage to, ah, make a confession, here it is!2020 was a record year for stress, hitting moms with kids at home hardestToday in “News that is Surprising to Absolutely No One” ….This 90-second deep breathing exercise will help relieve stressThis 90-second deep breathing exercise will help relieve stressThis 90-second deep breathing exercise will help relieve stressJUST WATCHEDThis 90-second deep breathing exercise will help relieve stressReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

This 90-second deep breathing exercise will help relieve stress 03:323 women said they found out they had the same cheating boyfriend, so they converted a school bus and went on a road tripThe friendships? The vibes? The 30-year-old remodeled school bus? You’re looking at a feel-good film right here. 100-pound tropical fish discovered on a beach in OregonAah! Last year we had to put a stop to scary bugs; is this year gonna be scary fish? Coffee won’t give you dangerous heart flutters, study says Time to move on to another low-grade health anxiety!It's thumbs up today, but the news on coffee has not always been positive. Take a look at the arguments for and against coffee through the centuries.It's thumbs up today, but the news on coffee has not always been positive. Take a look at the arguments for and against coffee through the centuries. Photos: Coffee's health historyIt’s thumbs up today, but the news on coffee has not always been positive. Take a look at the arguments for and against coffee through the centuries.Hide Caption 1 of 15Legend has it that coffee was discovered by Kaldi, an Ethiopian goatherd, after he caught his suddenly frisky goats eating glossy green leaves and red berries and then tried it for himself. Legend has it that coffee was discovered by Kaldi, an Ethiopian goatherd, after he caught his suddenly frisky goats eating glossy green leaves and red berries and then tried it for himself. Photos: Coffee's health history1500s headline: Coffee makes you frisky – Legend has it that coffee was discovered by Kaldi, an Ethiopian goatherd, after he caught his suddenly frisky goats eating glossy green leaves and red berries and then tried it for himself. Hide Caption 2 of 15But it was the Arabs who started coffeehouses, and that's where coffee got its first black mark. Patrons of coffeehouses were said to be more likely to gamble and engage in "criminally unorthodox sexual situations," according to author <a href="https://www.washington.edu/uwpress/search/books/HATCOF.html" target="_blank">Ralph Hattox</a>. But it was the Arabs who started coffeehouses, and that's where coffee got its first black mark. Patrons of coffeehouses were said to be more likely to gamble and engage in "criminally unorthodox sexual situations," according to author <a href="https://www.washington.edu/uwpress/search/books/HATCOF.html" target="_blank">Ralph Hattox</a>. Photos: Coffee's health history1500s headline: Coffee leads to illegal sex – But it was the Arabs who started coffeehouses, and that’s where coffee got its first black mark. Patrons of coffeehouses were said to be more likely to gamble and engage in “criminally unorthodox sexual situations,” according to author Ralph Hattox. Hide Caption 3 of 15As the popularity of coffee grew and spread, the medical community began to extol its benefits. It was especially popular in England as a cure for alcoholism, one of the biggest medical problems of the time.As the popularity of coffee grew and spread, the medical community began to extol its benefits. It was especially popular in England as a cure for alcoholism, one of the biggest medical problems of the time. Photos: Coffee's health history1600s headline: Coffee cures alcoholism – As the popularity of coffee grew and spread, the medical community began to extol its benefits. It was especially popular in England as a cure for alcoholism, one of the biggest medical problems of the time.Hide Caption 4 of 15This 1652 ad by London coffee shop owner Pasqua Rosée popularized coffee's healthy status, claiming that coffee could aid digestion, prevent and cure gout and scurvy, help coughs, headaches and stomachaches, and even prevent miscarriages. This 1652 ad by London coffee shop owner Pasqua Rosée popularized coffee's healthy status, claiming that coffee could aid digestion, prevent and cure gout and scurvy, help coughs, headaches and stomachaches, and even prevent miscarriages. Photos: Coffee's health history1600s headline: Coffee cures all? – This 1652 ad by London coffee shop owner Pasqua Rosée popularized coffee’s healthy status, claiming that coffee could aid digestion, prevent and cure gout and scurvy, help coughs, headaches and stomachaches, and even prevent miscarriages. Hide Caption 5 of 15By 1730, tea had replaced coffee in London as the daily drink of choice. That preference continued in the colonies until 1773, when the famous Boston Tea Party made it unpatriotic to drink tea. Coffee houses popped up everywhere, and the marvelous stimulant qualities of the brew were said to contribute to the ability of the colonists to work longer hours. By 1730, tea had replaced coffee in London as the daily drink of choice. That preference continued in the colonies until 1773, when the famous Boston Tea Party made it unpatriotic to drink tea. Coffee houses popped up everywhere, and the marvelous stimulant qualities of the brew were said to contribute to the ability of the colonists to work longer hours. Photos: Coffee's health history1700s headline: Coffee helps you work longer – By 1730, tea had replaced coffee in London as the daily drink of choice. That preference continued in the colonies until 1773, when the famous Boston Tea Party made it unpatriotic to drink tea. Coffee houses popped up everywhere, and the marvelous stimulant qualities of the brew were said to contribute to the ability of the colonists to work longer hours. Hide Caption 6 of 15In the mid-1800s, America was at war with itself, and one side effect was that coffee supplies ran short. Enter toasted grain-based beverage substitutes such as Kellogg's "Caramel Coffee" and C.W. Post's "Postum" (still manufactured), which advertised with anti-coffee tirades to boost sales. In the mid-1800s, America was at war with itself, and one side effect was that coffee supplies ran short. Enter toasted grain-based beverage substitutes such as Kellogg's "Caramel Coffee" and C.W. Post's "Postum" (still manufactured), which advertised with anti-coffee tirades to boost sales. Photos: Coffee's health history1800s headline: Coffee shortage – In the mid-1800s, America was at war with itself, and one side effect was that coffee supplies ran short. Enter toasted grain-based beverage substitutes such as Kellogg’s “Caramel Coffee” and C.W. Post’s “Postum” (still manufactured), which advertised with anti-coffee tirades to boost sales. Hide Caption 7 of 15Postum's ads <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=Hy0YIUYybOsC&pg=PA131&lpg=PA131&dq=19th-century+inventor+C.+W.+Post+on+coffee+bad+for+you&source=bl&ots=g2hh-151v4&sig=puGib3_29lDVz6F027IKRlnTNNY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CCkQ6AEwAmoVChMIiY25raukxwIVSVw-Ch14BwLK#v=onepage&q&f=false" target="_blank">against coffee</a> were especially negative, claiming that coffee was as bad as morphine, cocaine, nicotine or strychnine and could cause blindness. Postum's ads <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=Hy0YIUYybOsC&pg=PA131&lpg=PA131&dq=19th-century+inventor+C.+W.+Post+on+coffee+bad+for+you&source=bl&ots=g2hh-151v4&sig=puGib3_29lDVz6F027IKRlnTNNY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CCkQ6AEwAmoVChMIiY25raukxwIVSVw-Ch14BwLK#v=onepage&q&f=false" target="_blank">against coffee</a> were especially negative, claiming that coffee was as bad as morphine, cocaine, nicotine or strychnine and could cause blindness. Photos: Coffee's health history1800s headline: Coffee will make you go blind – Postum’s ads against coffee were especially negative, claiming that coffee was as bad as morphine, cocaine, nicotine or strychnine and could cause blindness. Hide Caption 8 of 15Medical concerns and negative public beliefs about the benefits of coffee rose in the early 1900s. Good Housekeeping magazine <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=ve5AAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA113#v=onepage&q&f=false" target="_blank">wrote about how coffee stunts growth</a>. <br />Medical concerns and negative public beliefs about the benefits of coffee rose in the early 1900s. Good Housekeeping magazine <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=ve5AAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA113#v=onepage&q&f=false" target="_blank">wrote about how coffee stunts growth</a>. <br /> Photos: Coffee's health history1916 headline: Coffee stunts your growth – Medical concerns and negative public beliefs about the benefits of coffee rose in the early 1900s. Good Housekeeping magazine wrote about how coffee stunts growth. Hide Caption 9 of 15In a 1927 Science magazine article, 80,000 elementary and junior high kids were asked about their coffee drinking habits. Researchers found the "startling" fact that most of them drank more than a cup of coffee a day, which was compared with scholarship with mostly negative results. In a 1927 Science magazine article, 80,000 elementary and junior high kids were asked about their coffee drinking habits. Researchers found the "startling" fact that most of them drank more than a cup of coffee a day, which was compared with scholarship with mostly negative results. Photos: Coffee's health history1927 headline: Coffee will give you bad grades, kids – In a 1927 Science magazine article, 80,000 elementary and junior high kids were asked about their coffee drinking habits. Researchers found the “startling” fact that most of them drank more than a cup of coffee a day, which was compared with scholarship with mostly negative results. Hide Caption 10 of 15In 1978, the same year Baseball Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio began selling Mr. Coffee on TV, a <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/339084" target="_blank">New England Journal of Medicine</a> study found a short-term rise in blood pressure after three cups of coffee. <br /><br />And a<a href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM197307122890203#t=articleTop" target="_blank"> 1973 study</a> found that drinking one to five cups of coffee a day increased risk of heart attacks by 60%, while drinking six or more cups a day doubled that risk to 120%. In 1978, the same year Baseball Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio began selling Mr. Coffee on TV, a <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/339084" target="_blank">New England Journal of Medicine</a> study found a short-term rise in blood pressure after three cups of coffee. <br /><br />And a<a href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM197307122890203#t=articleTop" target="_blank"> 1973 study</a> found that drinking one to five cups of coffee a day increased risk of heart attacks by 60%, while drinking six or more cups a day doubled that risk to 120%. Photos: Coffee's health history1970s headline: Coffee is as serious as a heart attack – In 1978, the same year Baseball Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio began selling Mr. Coffee on TV, a New England Journal of Medicine study found a short-term rise in blood pressure after three cups of coffee. And a 1973 study found that drinking one to five cups of coffee a day increased risk of heart attacks by 60%, while drinking six or more cups a day doubled that risk to 120%. Hide Caption 11 of 15Now begins the era of the meta-analysis, in which researchers look at hundreds of studies and apply scientific principles to find those which do the best job of randomizing and controlling for compounding factors, such as smoking. The results for coffee: mostly good.<br /><br />But first, a couple of negatives: A <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11369742" target="_blank">2001 study</a> found a 20% increase in risk of urinary tract cancer for coffee drinkers but not tea drinkers. That finding was repeated in a <a href="http://www.nature.com/articles/srep09051" target="_blank">2015 meta-analysis</a>. So if this is a risk factor in your family history, you might want to switch to tea.<br /><br />And a 2010 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19362749" target="_blank">meta-analysis</a> found a correlation between coffee consumption and lung disease, but the study found it impossible to completely eliminate the confounding effects of smoking.Now begins the era of the meta-analysis, in which researchers look at hundreds of studies and apply scientific principles to find those which do the best job of randomizing and controlling for compounding factors, such as smoking. The results for coffee: mostly good.<br /><br />But first, a couple of negatives: A <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11369742" target="_blank">2001 study</a> found a 20% increase in risk of urinary tract cancer for coffee drinkers but not tea drinkers. That finding was repeated in a <a href="http://www.nature.com/articles/srep09051" target="_blank">2015 meta-analysis</a>. So if this is a risk factor in your family history, you might want to switch to tea.<br /><br />And a 2010 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19362749" target="_blank">meta-analysis</a> found a correlation between coffee consumption and lung disease, but the study found it impossible to completely eliminate the confounding effects of smoking. Photos: Coffee's health history2000 era headline: Time for meta-analysis – Now begins the era of the meta-analysis, in which researchers look at hundreds of studies and apply scientific principles to find those which do the best job of randomizing and controlling for compounding factors, such as smoking. The results for coffee: mostly good.But first, a couple of negatives: A 2001 study found a 20% increase in risk of urinary tract cancer for coffee drinkers but not tea drinkers. That finding was repeated in a 2015 meta-analysis. So if this is a risk factor in your family history, you might want to switch to tea.And a 2010 meta-analysis found a correlation between coffee consumption and lung disease, but the study found it impossible to completely eliminate the confounding effects of smoking.Hide Caption 12 of 15A<a href="http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/174/9/993.long" target="_blank"> meta-analysis</a> of 11 studies on the link between stroke risk and coffee consumption between 1966 and 2011, with nearly a half a million participants, found no negative connection. And a 2012 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3526718/" target="_blank">meta-analysis</a> of studies between 2001 and 2011 found four or more cups a day had a preventative effect on your risk for stroke.  <br /><br />This <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016508507005689" target="_blank">meta-analysis </a>showed that drinking two cups of black coffee a day could reduce the risk of liver cancer by 43%. Those findings were <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1542356513006095" target="_blank">replicated</a> in 2013 in two <a href="http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-230X/13/34" target="_blank">other studies. </a><br /><br />As for prostate cancer, a <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21586702" target="_blank">2011 study</a> followed nearly 59,000 men from 1986 to 2006 and found drinking coffee to be highly associated with lower risk for the lethal form of the disease. A<a href="http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/174/9/993.long" target="_blank"> meta-analysis</a> of 11 studies on the link between stroke risk and coffee consumption between 1966 and 2011, with nearly a half a million participants, found no negative connection. And a 2012 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3526718/" target="_blank">meta-analysis</a> of studies between 2001 and 2011 found four or more cups a day had a preventative effect on your risk for stroke.  <br /><br />This <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016508507005689" target="_blank">meta-analysis </a>showed that drinking two cups of black coffee a day could reduce the risk of liver cancer by 43%. Those findings were <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1542356513006095" target="_blank">replicated</a> in 2013 in two <a href="http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-230X/13/34" target="_blank">other studies. </a><br /><br />As for prostate cancer, a <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21586702" target="_blank">2011 study</a> followed nearly 59,000 men from 1986 to 2006 and found drinking coffee to be highly associated with lower risk for the lethal form of the disease. Photos: Coffee's health history2007-2013 headlines: Coffee reduces risk of stroke and some cancers – A meta-analysis of 11 studies on the link between stroke risk and coffee consumption between 1966 and 2011, with nearly a half a million participants, found no negative connection. And a 2012 meta-analysis of studies between 2001 and 2011 found four or more cups a day had a preventative effect on your risk for stroke. This meta-analysis showed that drinking two cups of black coffee a day could reduce the risk of liver cancer by 43%. Those findings were replicated in 2013 in two other studies. As for prostate cancer, a 2011 study followed nearly 59,000 men from 1986 to 2006 and found drinking coffee to be highly associated with lower risk for the lethal form of the disease. Hide Caption 13 of 15A similar analysis of studies on<a href="http://circheartfailure.ahajournals.org/content/5/4/401.long" target="_blank"> heart failure</a> found four cups a day provided the lowest risk for heart failure, and you had to drink a whopping 10 cups a day to get a bad association.<br /><br />And overall heart disease? A <a href="http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/129/6/643.long" target="_blank">meta-analysis</a> of 36 studies with more than 1.2 million participants found that moderate coffee drinking seemed to be associated with a low risk for heart disease; plus, there wasn't a higher risk among those who drank more than five cups a day.A similar analysis of studies on<a href="http://circheartfailure.ahajournals.org/content/5/4/401.long" target="_blank"> heart failure</a> found four cups a day provided the lowest risk for heart failure, and you had to drink a whopping 10 cups a day to get a bad association.<br /><br />And overall heart disease? A <a href="http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/129/6/643.long" target="_blank">meta-analysis</a> of 36 studies with more than 1.2 million participants found that moderate coffee drinking seemed to be associated with a low risk for heart disease; plus, there wasn't a higher risk among those who drank more than five cups a day. Photos: Coffee's health historyA similar analysis of studies on heart failure found four cups a day provided the lowest risk for heart failure, and you had to drink a whopping 10 cups a day to get a bad association.And overall heart disease? A meta-analysis of 36 studies with more than 1.2 million participants found that moderate coffee drinking seemed to be associated with a low risk for heart disease; plus, there wasn’t a higher risk among those who drank more than five cups a day.Hide Caption 14 of 15How about coffee's effects on your overall risk of death? One 2013 analysis of <a href="http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9205090&fileId=S0007114513003814" target="_blank">20 studies</a>, and another that included <a href="http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9627964&fileId=S1368980014001438" target="_blank">17 studies</a>, both of which included more than a million people, found that drinking coffee reduced your total mortality risk slightly.<br /><br />And as a sign of the times, in 2015, the<a href="http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-scientific-report/PDFs/Scientific-Report-of-the-2015-Dietary-Guidelines-Advisory-Committee.pdf" target="_blank"> US Department of Agriculture</a> agreed that "coffee can be incorporated into a healthy lifestyle," especially if you stay within three and five cups a day (a maximum of 400 milligrams of caffeine) and avoid fattening cream and sugar. You can read its analysis of data <a href="http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-scientific-report/10-chapter-5/d5-4.asp" target="_blank">here.</a>How about coffee's effects on your overall risk of death? One 2013 analysis of <a href="http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9205090&fileId=S0007114513003814" target="_blank">20 studies</a>, and another that included <a href="http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9627964&fileId=S1368980014001438" target="_blank">17 studies</a>, both of which included more than a million people, found that drinking coffee reduced your total mortality risk slightly.<br /><br />And as a sign of the times, in 2015, the<a href="http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-scientific-report/PDFs/Scientific-Report-of-the-2015-Dietary-Guidelines-Advisory-Committee.pdf" target="_blank"> US Department of Agriculture</a> agreed that "coffee can be incorporated into a healthy lifestyle," especially if you stay within three and five cups a day (a maximum of 400 milligrams of caffeine) and avoid fattening cream and sugar. You can read its analysis of data <a href="http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-scientific-report/10-chapter-5/d5-4.asp" target="_blank">here.</a> Photos: Coffee's health history2015 headline: Coffee is practically a health food – How about coffee’s effects on your overall risk of death? One 2013 analysis of 20 studies, and another that included 17 studies, both of which included more than a million people, found that drinking coffee reduced your total mortality risk slightly.And as a sign of the times, in 2015, the US Department of Agriculture agreed that “coffee can be incorporated into a healthy lifestyle,” especially if you stay within three and five cups a day (a maximum of 400 milligrams of caffeine) and avoid fattening cream and sugar. You can read its analysis of data here.Hide Caption 15 of 1506 coffee health RESTRICTED04 coffee health RESTRICTED03 coffee health RESTRICTED02 coffee health RESTRICTED17 coffee health08 coffee health 18 coffee health RESTRICTED12 coffee health13 coffee health RESTRICTED01 coffee health RESTRICTED07 coffee health RESTRICTED14 coffee health RESTRICTED15 coffee health16 coffee health10 coffee healthTODAY’S NUMBER60,000That’s how many people can partake now in the Hajj in Saudi Arabia. The limit is one of several coronavirus precautions countries are taking during Eid al-Adha, one of the most important festivals of the Islamic calendar, marking the height of the annual pilgrimage to Mecca. Eid Mubarak.Muslims pray at the Namira Mosque as they take part in the annual Hajj pilgrimage on Monday, July 19.Muslims pray at the Namira Mosque as they take part in the annual Hajj pilgrimage on Monday, July 19. Photos: Pandemic limits Hajj pilgrimage for a second year in a rowMuslims pray at the Namira Mosque as they take part in the annual Hajj pilgrimage on Monday, July 19.Hide Caption 1 of 13A pilgrim prays at Mount Arafat on Monday.A pilgrim prays at Mount Arafat on Monday. Photos: Pandemic limits Hajj pilgrimage for a second year in a rowA pilgrim prays at Mount Arafat on Monday.Hide Caption 2 of 13Thousands of pilgrims leave after prayers at the Namira Mosque on Monday.Thousands of pilgrims leave after prayers at the Namira Mosque on Monday. Photos: Pandemic limits Hajj pilgrimage for a second year in a rowThousands of pilgrims leave after prayers at the Namira Mosque on Monday.Hide Caption 3 of 13Saudi police guard the entrance to Mount Arafat on Monday.Saudi police guard the entrance to Mount Arafat on Monday. Photos: Pandemic limits Hajj pilgrimage for a second year in a rowSaudi police guard the entrance to Mount Arafat on Monday.Hide Caption 4 of 13A pilgrim walks in a corridor of a tent camp as a doctor works in a camp clinic in Mina, near the holy city of Mecca, on Sunday.A pilgrim walks in a corridor of a tent camp as a doctor works in a camp clinic in Mina, near the holy city of Mecca, on Sunday. Photos: Pandemic limits Hajj pilgrimage for a second year in a rowA pilgrim walks in a corridor of a tent camp as a doctor works in a camp clinic in Mina, near the holy city of Mecca, on Sunday.Hide Caption 5 of 13Pilgrims pray in front of the Al-Safa mountain at the Grand Mosque on Sunday.Pilgrims pray in front of the Al-Safa mountain at the Grand Mosque on Sunday. Photos: Pandemic limits Hajj pilgrimage for a second year in a rowPilgrims pray in front of the Al-Safa mountain at the Grand Mosque on Sunday.Hide Caption 6 of 13Workers at the Grand Mosque disinfect the grounds around the Kaaba on Saturday.Workers at the Grand Mosque disinfect the grounds around the Kaaba on Saturday. Photos: Pandemic limits Hajj pilgrimage for a second year in a rowWorkers at the Grand Mosque disinfect the grounds around the Kaaba on Saturday.Hide Caption 7 of 13A woman receives calls Wednesday at the National Center for Security Operations in Mecca.A woman receives calls Wednesday at the National Center for Security Operations in Mecca. Photos: Pandemic limits Hajj pilgrimage for a second year in a rowA woman receives calls Wednesday at the National Center for Security Operations in Mecca.Hide Caption 8 of 13Sudanese workers disinfect tents in Mina as they prepare for Hajj pilgrims on Wednesday.Sudanese workers disinfect tents in Mina as they prepare for Hajj pilgrims on Wednesday. Photos: Pandemic limits Hajj pilgrimage for a second year in a rowSudanese workers disinfect tents in Mina as they prepare for Hajj pilgrims on Wednesday.Hide Caption 9 of 13Saudi workers embroider Islamic calligraphy, using either pure silver threads or silver threads plated with gold, as they prepare the Kiswa, or drape, that covers the Kaaba during Hajj.Saudi workers embroider Islamic calligraphy, using either pure silver threads or silver threads plated with gold, as they prepare the Kiswa, or drape, that covers the Kaaba during Hajj. Photos: Pandemic limits Hajj pilgrimage for a second year in a rowSaudi workers embroider Islamic calligraphy, using either pure silver threads or silver threads plated with gold, as they prepare the Kiswa, or drape, that covers the Kaaba during Hajj.Hide Caption 10 of 13Tents are set up in Mina on Tuesday.Tents are set up in Mina on Tuesday. Photos: Pandemic limits Hajj pilgrimage for a second year in a rowTents are set up in Mina on Tuesday.Hide Caption 11 of 13Security personnel use smart screens to watch pilgrims at a reception center in Mecca on July 12.Security personnel use smart screens to watch pilgrims at a reception center in Mecca on July 12. Photos: Pandemic limits Hajj pilgrimage for a second year in a rowSecurity personnel use smart screens to watch pilgrims at a reception center in Mecca on July 12.Hide Caption 12 of 13Workers set up accommodations for pilgrims at the Mina tent camp on July 12.Workers set up accommodations for pilgrims at the Mina tent camp on July 12. Photos: Pandemic limits Hajj pilgrimage for a second year in a rowWorkers set up accommodations for pilgrims at the Mina tent camp on July 12.Hide Caption 13 of 130719 Hajj150719 Hajj130719 Hajj100719 Hajj 140719 Hajj90719 Hajj80719 Hajj70719 Hajj60719 Hajj 50719 Hajj40719 Hajj30719 Hajj20719 Hajj1TODAY’S QUOTE”You know, we have lots of problems here and now on Earth and we need to work on those, and we always need to look to the future.”Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, on criticism that his Blue Origin flight and other billionaire-backed space ventures are a waste of funds that could be used to help a struggling planet. Bezos and his team blast off for a short space flight today around 9 a.m. ET. Here’s how to watch.This is what will happen during Jeff Bezos' flight to spaceThis is what will happen during Jeff Bezos' flight to spaceThis is what will happen during Jeff Bezos' flight to spaceJUST WATCHEDThis is what will happen during Jeff Bezos’ flight to spaceReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

This is what will happen during Jeff Bezos’ flight to space 06:09TODAY’S WEATHERMore dry storms for the WestMore dry storms for the WestMore dry storms for the WestJUST WATCHEDMore dry storms for the WestReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

More dry storms for the West 02:13Check your local forecast here>>>AND FINALLYTalk about virtual learning!Do you kind of know what string theory is but, you know, not really? This short breakdown is actually fascinating — promise! (Click here to view.)

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https://www.cnn.com/2021/07/20/us/five-things-july-20-trnd/index.html

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