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(CNN)Since President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration won’t be a heavily attended in-person event, his team is working on turning it into something different: A prime-time TV special.

Here’s what you need to know to Get Up to Speed and On with Your Day. (You can also get “5 Things You Need to Know Today” delivered to your inbox daily. Sign up here.)1. ImpeachmentPresident Trump has been impeached for a second time. Ten House Republicans joined their Democratic colleagues in charging Trump with “incitement of insurrection” for his role in last week’s violence at the Capitol. The final House vote was 232 to 197. Now, you remember what comes next: The article moves to the Senate, but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said Trump won’t face his trial until after Biden is sworn in next week. So, no, this impeachment won’t force Trump out of office. Biden and his team are looking to keep the Senate trial swift, as Congress will be dealing with other important tasks, like Covid-19 relief and confirmation of Cabinet nominees.House Republicans who voted for impeachment explain whyHouse Republicans who voted for impeachment explain whyHouse Republicans who voted for impeachment explain whyJUST WATCHEDHouse Republicans who voted for impeachment explain whyReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

House Republicans who voted for impeachment explain why 02:48Read More2. Capitol riot investigationInvestigators are now looking into the possibility that the Capitol riot was more than just a protest that spiraled out of control. Evidence uncovered so far, including weapons and tactics seen on surveillance video, suggests the breach may have been planned. Questions also have been raised about whether rioters had “insider” help. At least one protest organizer said he coordinated with three House Republicans. The Department of Justice is using tactics it typically employs in counterterrorism investigations to apprehend and charge suspects. With a slew of new charges, including for Olympic medalist Klete Keller and a man seen on video wearing a “Camp Auschwitz” sweatshirt, the number of new federal criminal cases is up to 32, with possibly hundreds more expected.'Nothing like I've seen:' Bash reacts to video of resting troops in Capitol'Nothing like I've seen:' Bash reacts to video of resting troops in CapitolCapitol Hill National Guard security resting protection Bash vpx_00004417JUST WATCHED’Nothing like I’ve seen:’ Bash reacts to video of resting troops in CapitolReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

‘Nothing like I’ve seen:’ Bash reacts to video of resting troops in Capitol 00:573. Coronavirus Pharmacies are offering their help as the US struggles with its Covid-19 rollout. Pharmacists nationwide would have the capacity to administer 100 million doses of the Covid-19 vaccine once supply is available, the CEO of the National Association of Chain Drug Stores said, giving important backup to overwhelmed health care systems. The World Health Organization is also asking wealthier countries to share vaccines with lower-income countries, urging kindness and global solidarity. In the 36 days since countries started vaccinating, 28 million vaccine doses have been administered in 46 countries. Only one of these countries is low-income, a WHO official said. There have been 5 million new Covid-19 cases and 85,000 deaths across the globe in the past week alone.Pandemic takes devastating toll on Black-owned businessesPandemic takes devastating toll on Black-owned businessesPandemic takes devastating toll on Black-owned businessesJUST WATCHEDPandemic takes devastating toll on Black-owned businessesReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Pandemic takes devastating toll on Black-owned businesses 02:464. Flint Former Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder and ex-Flint Public Works Director Howard Croft have been charged in the Flint water crisis that left 12 people dead and sickened at least 80. Each faces two misdemeanor counts of willful neglect of duty. Flint has been exposed to extremely high levels of lead since 2014, when city and state officials switched the city’s water supply from the Detroit Water System to the contaminated Flint River in an effort to cut costs. The Environmental Protection Agency detected the lead in 2015 after residents complained. Snyder apologized in 2016 for the Michigan government’s role in the crisis. Last year, the state reached a $600 million settlement with victims. Criminal charges against other officials were dropped in 2019.The story behind the Flint water crisisThe story behind the Flint water crisisThe story behind the Flint water crisisJUST WATCHEDThe story behind the Flint water crisisReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

The story behind the Flint water crisis 02:015. ISISAfghanistan’s intelligence agency says it has foiled an ISIS attempt to assassinate a US diplomat in Kabul. The country’s National Directorate of Security reported that four ISIS members were planning to attack the US Charge d’Affaires in Kabul, Ross Wilson, along with Afghan senior officials on Monday. Public details on how they planned to carry out the killings are scarce, but all four would-be attackers have been arrested. The US State Department called the reports “deeply troubling” and reiterated the US commitment to peace in the region.BREAKFAST BROWSEThere may be fewer galaxies in the universe than we thoughtIt’s always nice to know our vast, unexplored universe is just slightly less populated than assumed. Shown here is a phenomenon known as zodiacal light, which is caused by sunlight reflecting off tiny dust particles in the inner solar system.Shown here is a phenomenon known as zodiacal light, which is caused by sunlight reflecting off tiny dust particles in the inner solar system. Photos: Wonders of the universeShown here is a phenomenon known as zodiacal light, which is caused by sunlight reflecting off tiny dust particles in the inner solar system.Hide Caption 1 of 200This artist's impression of the distant galaxy ID2299 shows some of its gas being ejected by a "tidal tail" as a result of a merger between two galaxies. This artist's impression of the distant galaxy ID2299 shows some of its gas being ejected by a "tidal tail" as a result of a merger between two galaxies. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis artist’s impression of the distant galaxy ID2299 shows some of its gas being ejected by a “tidal tail” as a result of a merger between two galaxies. Hide Caption 2 of 200This diagram shows the two most important companion galaxies to the Milky Way: the Large Magellanic Cloud (left) and the Small Magellanic Cloud. It was made using data from the European Space Agency Gaia satellite.This diagram shows the two most important companion galaxies to the Milky Way: the Large Magellanic Cloud (left) and the Small Magellanic Cloud. It was made using data from the European Space Agency Gaia satellite. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis diagram shows the two most important companion galaxies to the Milky Way: the Large Magellanic Cloud (left) and the Small Magellanic Cloud. It was made using data from the European Space Agency Gaia satellite.Hide Caption 3 of 200The Blue Ring Nebula is thought to be a never-before-seen phase that occurs after the merger of two stars. Debris flowing out from the merger was sliced by a disk around one of the stars, creating two cones of material glowing in ultraviolet light.The Blue Ring Nebula is thought to be a never-before-seen phase that occurs after the merger of two stars. Debris flowing out from the merger was sliced by a disk around one of the stars, creating two cones of material glowing in ultraviolet light. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Blue Ring Nebula is thought to be a never-before-seen phase that occurs after the merger of two stars. Debris flowing out from the merger was sliced by a disk around one of the stars, creating two cones of material glowing in ultraviolet light.Hide Caption 4 of 200The red supergiant star Betelgeuse, in the constellation of Orion, experienced unprecedented dimming late in 2019. This image was taken in January using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope.The red supergiant star Betelgeuse, in the constellation of Orion, experienced unprecedented dimming late in 2019. This image was taken in January using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe red supergiant star Betelgeuse, in the constellation of Orion, experienced unprecedented dimming late in 2019. This image was taken in January using the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope.Hide Caption 5 of 200This is an infrared image of Apep, a Wolf-Rayet star binary system located 8,000 light-years from Earth.This is an infrared image of Apep, a Wolf-Rayet star binary system located 8,000 light-years from Earth. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an infrared image of Apep, a Wolf-Rayet star binary system located 8,000 light-years from Earth.Hide Caption 6 of 200An artist's illustration, left, helps visualize the details of an unusual star system, GW Orionis, in the Orion constellation. The system's circumstellar disk is broken, resulting in misaligned rings around its three stars.An artist's illustration, left, helps visualize the details of an unusual star system, GW Orionis, in the Orion constellation. The system's circumstellar disk is broken, resulting in misaligned rings around its three stars. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s illustration, left, helps visualize the details of an unusual star system, GW Orionis, in the Orion constellation. The system’s circumstellar disk is broken, resulting in misaligned rings around its three stars.Hide Caption 7 of 200This is a simulation of two spiral black holes that merge and emit gravitational waves. This is a simulation of two spiral black holes that merge and emit gravitational waves. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is a simulation of two spiral black holes that merge and emit gravitational waves. Hide Caption 8 of 200This artist's illustration shows the unexpected dimming of the star Betelgeuse.This artist's illustration shows the unexpected dimming of the star Betelgeuse. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis artist’s illustration shows the unexpected dimming of the star Betelgeuse.Hide Caption 9 of 200This extremely distant galaxy, which looks similar to our own Milky Way, appears like a ring of light.This extremely distant galaxy, which looks similar to our own Milky Way, appears like a ring of light. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis extremely distant galaxy, which looks similar to our own Milky Way, appears like a ring of light.Hide Caption 10 of 200This artist's interpretation shows the calcium-rich supernova 2019ehk. The orange represents the calcium-rich material created in the explosion. Purple reveals gas shed by the star right before the explosion.This artist's interpretation shows the calcium-rich supernova 2019ehk. The orange represents the calcium-rich material created in the explosion. Purple reveals gas shed by the star right before the explosion. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis artist’s interpretation shows the calcium-rich supernova 2019ehk. The orange represents the calcium-rich material created in the explosion. Purple reveals gas shed by the star right before the explosion.Hide Caption 11 of 200The blue dot at the center of this image marks the approximate location of a supernova event which occurred 140 million light-years from Earth, where a white dwarf exploded and created an ultraviolet flash. It was located close to tail of the Draco constellation. The blue dot at the center of this image marks the approximate location of a supernova event which occurred 140 million light-years from Earth, where a white dwarf exploded and created an ultraviolet flash. It was located close to tail of the Draco constellation. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe blue dot at the center of this image marks the approximate location of a supernova event which occurred 140 million light-years from Earth, where a white dwarf exploded and created an ultraviolet flash. It was located close to tail of the Draco constellation. Hide Caption 12 of 200This radar image captured by NASA's Magellan mission to Venus in 1991 shows a corona, a large circular structure 120 miles in diameter, named Aine Corona. This radar image captured by NASA's Magellan mission to Venus in 1991 shows a corona, a large circular structure 120 miles in diameter, named Aine Corona. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis radar image captured by NASA’s Magellan mission to Venus in 1991 shows a corona, a large circular structure 120 miles in diameter, named Aine Corona. Hide Caption 13 of 200When a star's mass is ejected during a supernova, it expands quickly. Eventually, it will slow and form a hot bubble of glowing gas. A white dwarf will emerge from this gas bubble and move across the galaxy. When a star's mass is ejected during a supernova, it expands quickly. Eventually, it will slow and form a hot bubble of glowing gas. A white dwarf will emerge from this gas bubble and move across the galaxy. Photos: Wonders of the universeWhen a star’s mass is ejected during a supernova, it expands quickly. Eventually, it will slow and form a hot bubble of glowing gas. A white dwarf will emerge from this gas bubble and move across the galaxy. Hide Caption 14 of 200The afterglow of short gamma ray burst that was detected 10 billion light-years away is shown here in a circle. This image was taken by the Gemini-North telescope.The afterglow of short gamma ray burst that was detected 10 billion light-years away is shown here in a circle. This image was taken by the Gemini-North telescope. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe afterglow of short gamma ray burst that was detected 10 billion light-years away is shown here in a circle. This image was taken by the Gemini-North telescope.Hide Caption 15 of 200This Hubble Space Telescope image shows NGC 7513, a barred spiral galaxy 60 million light-years away. Due to the expansion of the universe, the galaxy appears to be moving away from the Milky Way at an accelerate rate.This Hubble Space Telescope image shows NGC 7513, a barred spiral galaxy 60 million light-years away. Due to the expansion of the universe, the galaxy appears to be moving away from the Milky Way at an accelerate rate. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis Hubble Space Telescope image shows NGC 7513, a barred spiral galaxy 60 million light-years away. Due to the expansion of the universe, the galaxy appears to be moving away from the Milky Way at an accelerate rate.Hide Caption 16 of 200This artist's concept illustration shows what the luminous blue variable star in the Kinman Dwarf galaxy may have looked like before it mysteriously disappeared.This artist's concept illustration shows what the luminous blue variable star in the Kinman Dwarf galaxy may have looked like before it mysteriously disappeared. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis artist’s concept illustration shows what the luminous blue variable star in the Kinman Dwarf galaxy may have looked like before it mysteriously disappeared.Hide Caption 17 of 200This is an artist's illustration of a supermassive black hole and its surrounding disk of gas. Inside this disk are two smaller black holes orbiting one another. Researchers identified a flare of light suspected to have come from one such binary pair soon after they merged into a larger black hole. This is an artist's illustration of a supermassive black hole and its surrounding disk of gas. Inside this disk are two smaller black holes orbiting one another. Researchers identified a flare of light suspected to have come from one such binary pair soon after they merged into a larger black hole. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s illustration of a supermassive black hole and its surrounding disk of gas. Inside this disk are two smaller black holes orbiting one another. Researchers identified a flare of light suspected to have come from one such binary pair soon after they merged into a larger black hole. Hide Caption 18 of 200This image, taken from a video, shows what happens as two objects of different masses merge together and create gravitational waves. This image, taken from a video, shows what happens as two objects of different masses merge together and create gravitational waves. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis image, taken from a video, shows what happens as two objects of different masses merge together and create gravitational waves. Hide Caption 19 of 200This is an artist's impression showing the detection of a repeating fast radio burst seen in blue, which is in orbit with an astrophysical object seen in pink. This is an artist's impression showing the detection of a repeating fast radio burst seen in blue, which is in orbit with an astrophysical object seen in pink. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s impression showing the detection of a repeating fast radio burst seen in blue, which is in orbit with an astrophysical object seen in pink. Hide Caption 20 of 200Fast radio bursts, which make a splash by leaving their host galaxy in a bright burst of radio waves, helped detect "missing matter" in the universe.Fast radio bursts, which make a splash by leaving their host galaxy in a bright burst of radio waves, helped detect "missing matter" in the universe. Photos: Wonders of the universeFast radio bursts, which make a splash by leaving their host galaxy in a bright burst of radio waves, helped detect “missing matter” in the universe.Hide Caption 21 of 200A new type of explosion was found in a tiny galaxy 500 million light-years away from Earth. This type of explosion is referred to as a fast blue optical transient.A new type of explosion was found in a tiny galaxy 500 million light-years away from Earth. This type of explosion is referred to as a fast blue optical transient. Photos: Wonders of the universeA new type of explosion was found in a tiny galaxy 500 million light-years away from Earth. This type of explosion is referred to as a fast blue optical transient.Hide Caption 22 of 200 Astronomers have discovered a rare type of galaxy described as a "cosmic ring of fire." This artist's illustration shows the galaxy as it existed 11 billion years ago. Astronomers have discovered a rare type of galaxy described as a "cosmic ring of fire." This artist's illustration shows the galaxy as it existed 11 billion years ago. Photos: Wonders of the universe Astronomers have discovered a rare type of galaxy described as a “cosmic ring of fire.” This artist’s illustration shows the galaxy as it existed 11 billion years ago.Hide Caption 23 of 200This is an artist's impression of the Wolfe Disk, a massive rotating disk galaxy in the early universe. This is an artist's impression of the Wolfe Disk, a massive rotating disk galaxy in the early universe. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s impression of the Wolfe Disk, a massive rotating disk galaxy in the early universe. Hide Caption 24 of 200A bright yellow "twist" near the center of this image shows where a planet may be forming around the AB Aurigae star. The image was captured by the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope.A bright yellow "twist" near the center of this image shows where a planet may be forming around the AB Aurigae star. The image was captured by the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. Photos: Wonders of the universeA bright yellow “twist” near the center of this image shows where a planet may be forming around the AB Aurigae star. The image was captured by the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope.Hide Caption 25 of 200This artist's illustration shows the orbits of two stars and an invisible black hole 1,000 light-years from Earth. This system includes one star (small orbit seen in blue) orbiting a newly discovered black hole (orbit in red), as well as a third star in a wider orbit (also in blue). This artist's illustration shows the orbits of two stars and an invisible black hole 1,000 light-years from Earth. This system includes one star (small orbit seen in blue) orbiting a newly discovered black hole (orbit in red), as well as a third star in a wider orbit (also in blue). Photos: Wonders of the universeThis artist’s illustration shows the orbits of two stars and an invisible black hole 1,000 light-years from Earth. This system includes one star (small orbit seen in blue) orbiting a newly discovered black hole (orbit in red), as well as a third star in a wider orbit (also in blue). Hide Caption 26 of 200This illustration shows a star's core, known as a white dwarf, pulled into orbit around a black hole. During each orbit, the black hole rips off more material from the star and pulls it into a glowing disk of material around the black hole. Before its encounter with the black hole, the star was a red giant in the last stages of stellar evolution.This illustration shows a star's core, known as a white dwarf, pulled into orbit around a black hole. During each orbit, the black hole rips off more material from the star and pulls it into a glowing disk of material around the black hole. Before its encounter with the black hole, the star was a red giant in the last stages of stellar evolution. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis illustration shows a star’s core, known as a white dwarf, pulled into orbit around a black hole. During each orbit, the black hole rips off more material from the star and pulls it into a glowing disk of material around the black hole. Before its encounter with the black hole, the star was a red giant in the last stages of stellar evolution.Hide Caption 27 of 200This artist's illustration shows the collision of two 125-mile-wide icy, dusty bodies orbiting the bright star Fomalhaut, located 25 light-years away. The observation of the aftermath of this collision was once thought to be an exoplanet. This artist's illustration shows the collision of two 125-mile-wide icy, dusty bodies orbiting the bright star Fomalhaut, located 25 light-years away. The observation of the aftermath of this collision was once thought to be an exoplanet. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis artist’s illustration shows the collision of two 125-mile-wide icy, dusty bodies orbiting the bright star Fomalhaut, located 25 light-years away. The observation of the aftermath of this collision was once thought to be an exoplanet. Hide Caption 28 of 200This is an artist's impression of the interstellar comet 2I/Borisov as it travels through our solar system. New observations detected carbon monixide in the cometary tail as the sun heated the comet.This is an artist's impression of the interstellar comet 2I/Borisov as it travels through our solar system. New observations detected carbon monixide in the cometary tail as the sun heated the comet. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s impression of the interstellar comet 2I/Borisov as it travels through our solar system. New observations detected carbon monixide in the cometary tail as the sun heated the comet.Hide Caption 29 of 200This rosette pattern is the orbit of a star, called S2, around the supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. This rosette pattern is the orbit of a star, called S2, around the supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis rosette pattern is the orbit of a star, called S2, around the supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. Hide Caption 30 of 200This is an artist's illustration of SN2016aps, which astronomers believe is the brightest supernova ever observed.This is an artist's illustration of SN2016aps, which astronomers believe is the brightest supernova ever observed. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s illustration of SN2016aps, which astronomers believe is the brightest supernova ever observed.Hide Caption 31 of 200This is an artist's illustration of a brown dwarf, or a "failed star" object, and its magnetic field. The brown dwarf's atmosphere and magnetic field rotate at different speeds, which allowed astronomers to determine wind speed on the object. This is an artist's illustration of a brown dwarf, or a "failed star" object, and its magnetic field. The brown dwarf's atmosphere and magnetic field rotate at different speeds, which allowed astronomers to determine wind speed on the object. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s illustration of a brown dwarf, or a “failed star” object, and its magnetic field. The brown dwarf’s atmosphere and magnetic field rotate at different speeds, which allowed astronomers to determine wind speed on the object. Hide Caption 32 of 200This artist's illustration shows an intermediate-mass black hole tearing into a star.This artist's illustration shows an intermediate-mass black hole tearing into a star. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis artist’s illustration shows an intermediate-mass black hole tearing into a star.Hide Caption 33 of 200This is an artist's impression of a large star known as HD74423 and its much smaller red dwarf companion in a binary star system. The large star appears to pulsate on one side only, and it's being distorted by the gravitational pull of its companion star into a teardrop shape. This is an artist's impression of a large star known as HD74423 and its much smaller red dwarf companion in a binary star system. The large star appears to pulsate on one side only, and it's being distorted by the gravitational pull of its companion star into a teardrop shape. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s impression of a large star known as HD74423 and its much smaller red dwarf companion in a binary star system. The large star appears to pulsate on one side only, and it’s being distorted by the gravitational pull of its companion star into a teardrop shape. Hide Caption 34 of 200This is an artist's impression of two white dwarfs in the process of merging. While astronomers expected that this might cause a supernova, they have found an instance of two white dwarf stars that survived merging.This is an artist's impression of two white dwarfs in the process of merging. While astronomers expected that this might cause a supernova, they have found an instance of two white dwarf stars that survived merging. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s impression of two white dwarfs in the process of merging. While astronomers expected that this might cause a supernova, they have found an instance of two white dwarf stars that survived merging.Hide Caption 35 of 200A combination of space and ground-based telescopes have found evidence for the biggest explosion seen in the universe. The explosion was created by a black hole located in the Ophiuchus cluster's central galaxy, which has blasted out jets and carved a large cavity in the surrounding hot gas. A combination of space and ground-based telescopes have found evidence for the biggest explosion seen in the universe. The explosion was created by a black hole located in the Ophiuchus cluster's central galaxy, which has blasted out jets and carved a large cavity in the surrounding hot gas. Photos: Wonders of the universeA combination of space and ground-based telescopes have found evidence for the biggest explosion seen in the universe. The explosion was created by a black hole located in the Ophiuchus cluster’s central galaxy, which has blasted out jets and carved a large cavity in the surrounding hot gas. Hide Caption 36 of 200This new ALMA image shows the outcome of a stellar fight: a complex and stunning gas environment surrounding the binary star system HD101584. This new ALMA image shows the outcome of a stellar fight: a complex and stunning gas environment surrounding the binary star system HD101584. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis new ALMA image shows the outcome of a stellar fight: a complex and stunning gas environment surrounding the binary star system HD101584. Hide Caption 37 of 200NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope captured the Tarantula Nebula in two wavelengths of infrared light. The red represents hot gas, while the blue regions are interstellar dust.NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope captured the Tarantula Nebula in two wavelengths of infrared light. The red represents hot gas, while the blue regions are interstellar dust. Photos: Wonders of the universeNASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope captured the Tarantula Nebula in two wavelengths of infrared light. The red represents hot gas, while the blue regions are interstellar dust.Hide Caption 38 of 200A white dwarf, left, is pulling material off of a brown dwarf, right, about 3,000 light-years from Earth.A white dwarf, left, is pulling material off of a brown dwarf, right, about 3,000 light-years from Earth. Photos: Wonders of the universeA white dwarf, left, is pulling material off of a brown dwarf, right, about 3,000 light-years from Earth.Hide Caption 39 of 200This image shows the orbits of the six G objects at the center of our galaxy, with the supermassive black hole indicated with a white cross. Stars, gas and dust are in the background.This image shows the orbits of the six G objects at the center of our galaxy, with the supermassive black hole indicated with a white cross. Stars, gas and dust are in the background. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis image shows the orbits of the six G objects at the center of our galaxy, with the supermassive black hole indicated with a white cross. Stars, gas and dust are in the background.Hide Caption 40 of 200After stars die, they expel their particles out into space, which form new stars in turn. In one case, stardust became embedded in a meteorite that fell to Earth. This illustration shows that stardust could flow from sources like the Egg Nebula to create the grains recovered from the meteorite, which landed in Australia.After stars die, they expel their particles out into space, which form new stars in turn. In one case, stardust became embedded in a meteorite that fell to Earth. This illustration shows that stardust could flow from sources like the Egg Nebula to create the grains recovered from the meteorite, which landed in Australia. Photos: Wonders of the universeAfter stars die, they expel their particles out into space, which form new stars in turn. In one case, stardust became embedded in a meteorite that fell to Earth. This illustration shows that stardust could flow from sources like the Egg Nebula to create the grains recovered from the meteorite, which landed in Australia.Hide Caption 41 of 200The former North Star, Alpha Draconis or Thuban, is circled here in an image of the northern sky. The former North Star, Alpha Draconis or Thuban, is circled here in an image of the northern sky. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe former North Star, Alpha Draconis or Thuban, is circled here in an image of the northern sky. Hide Caption 42 of 200Galaxy UGC 2885, nicknamed the "Godzilla galaxy," may be the largest one in the local universe.Galaxy UGC 2885, nicknamed the "Godzilla galaxy," may be the largest one in the local universe. Photos: Wonders of the universeGalaxy UGC 2885, nicknamed the “Godzilla galaxy,” may be the largest one in the local universe.Hide Caption 43 of 200The host galaxy of a newly traced repeating fast radio burst acquired with the 8-meter Gemini-North telescope. The host galaxy of a newly traced repeating fast radio burst acquired with the 8-meter Gemini-North telescope. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe host galaxy of a newly traced repeating fast radio burst acquired with the 8-meter Gemini-North telescope. Hide Caption 44 of 200The Milky Way's central region was imaged using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. The Milky Way's central region was imaged using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Milky Way’s central region was imaged using the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope. Hide Caption 45 of 200This is an artist's illustration of what MAMBO-9 would look like in visible light. The galaxy is very dusty and it has yet to build most of its stars. The two components show that the galaxy is in the process of merging.This is an artist's illustration of what MAMBO-9 would look like in visible light. The galaxy is very dusty and it has yet to build most of its stars. The two components show that the galaxy is in the process of merging. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s illustration of what MAMBO-9 would look like in visible light. The galaxy is very dusty and it has yet to build most of its stars. The two components show that the galaxy is in the process of merging.Hide Caption 46 of 200Astronomers have found a white dwarf star surrounded by a gas disk created from an ice giant planet being torn apart by its gravity. Astronomers have found a white dwarf star surrounded by a gas disk created from an ice giant planet being torn apart by its gravity. Photos: Wonders of the universeAstronomers have found a white dwarf star surrounded by a gas disk created from an ice giant planet being torn apart by its gravity. Hide Caption 47 of 200New measurements of the black hole at the center of the Holm 15A galaxy reveal it's 40 billion times more massive than our sun, making it the heaviest known black hole to be directly measured.New measurements of the black hole at the center of the Holm 15A galaxy reveal it's 40 billion times more massive than our sun, making it the heaviest known black hole to be directly measured. Photos: Wonders of the universeNew measurements of the black hole at the center of the Holm 15A galaxy reveal it’s 40 billion times more massive than our sun, making it the heaviest known black hole to be directly measured.Hide Caption 48 of 200This <a href="https://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2019/bhfeedback/" target="_blank">image</a>, which combines observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Karl Jansky Very Large Array, shows a black hole that is triggering star formation nearly one million light-years away from it. The large red bubble on the left is a hot gas bubble and the dots of light to the right of it are four galaxies where star formation has increased. The host galaxy of the black hole that released the gas bubble is the bright point of light to the right of the golden light at the center. This <a href="https://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2019/bhfeedback/" target="_blank">image</a>, which combines observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Karl Jansky Very Large Array, shows a black hole that is triggering star formation nearly one million light-years away from it. The large red bubble on the left is a hot gas bubble and the dots of light to the right of it are four galaxies where star formation has increased. The host galaxy of the black hole that released the gas bubble is the bright point of light to the right of the golden light at the center. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis image, which combines observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Karl Jansky Very Large Array, shows a black hole that is triggering star formation nearly one million light-years away from it. The large red bubble on the left is a hot gas bubble and the dots of light to the right of it are four galaxies where star formation has increased. The host galaxy of the black hole that released the gas bubble is the bright point of light to the right of the golden light at the center. Hide Caption 49 of 200A close-up view of an interstellar comet passing through our solar system can be seen on the left. On the right, astronomers used an image of Earth for comparison. A close-up view of an interstellar comet passing through our solar system can be seen on the left. On the right, astronomers used an image of Earth for comparison. Photos: Wonders of the universeA close-up view of an interstellar comet passing through our solar system can be seen on the left. On the right, astronomers used an image of Earth for comparison. Hide Caption 50 of 200The galaxy NGC 6240 hosts three supermassive black holes at its core. The galaxy NGC 6240 hosts three supermassive black holes at its core. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe galaxy NGC 6240 hosts three supermassive black holes at its core. Hide Caption 51 of 200Gamma-ray bursts are shown in this artist's illustration. They can be triggered by the collision or neutron stars or the explosion of a super massive star, collapsing into a black hole. Gamma-ray bursts are shown in this artist's illustration. They can be triggered by the collision or neutron stars or the explosion of a super massive star, collapsing into a black hole. Photos: Wonders of the universeGamma-ray bursts are shown in this artist’s illustration. They can be triggered by the collision or neutron stars or the explosion of a super massive star, collapsing into a black hole. Hide Caption 52 of 200Two gaseous clouds resembling peacocks have been found in neighboring dwarf galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud. In these images by the ALMA telescopes, red and green highlight molecular gas while blue shows ionized hydrogen gas.Two gaseous clouds resembling peacocks have been found in neighboring dwarf galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud. In these images by the ALMA telescopes, red and green highlight molecular gas while blue shows ionized hydrogen gas. Photos: Wonders of the universeTwo gaseous clouds resembling peacocks have been found in neighboring dwarf galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud. In these images by the ALMA telescopes, red and green highlight molecular gas while blue shows ionized hydrogen gas.Hide Caption 53 of 200An artist's impression of the Milky Way's big black hole flinging a star from the galaxy's center.An artist's impression of the Milky Way's big black hole flinging a star from the galaxy's center. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s impression of the Milky Way’s big black hole flinging a star from the galaxy’s center.Hide Caption 54 of 200The Jack-o'-lantern Nebula is on the edge of the Milky Way. Radiation from the massive star at its center created spooky-looking gaps in the nebula that make it look like a carved pumpkin.The Jack-o'-lantern Nebula is on the edge of the Milky Way. Radiation from the massive star at its center created spooky-looking gaps in the nebula that make it look like a carved pumpkin. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Jack-o’-lantern Nebula is on the edge of the Milky Way. Radiation from the massive star at its center created spooky-looking gaps in the nebula that make it look like a carved pumpkin.Hide Caption 55 of 200This new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captures two galaxies of equal size in a collision that appears to resemble a ghostly face. This observation was made on 19 June 2019 in visible light by the telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys.This new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captures two galaxies of equal size in a collision that appears to resemble a ghostly face. This observation was made on 19 June 2019 in visible light by the telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captures two galaxies of equal size in a collision that appears to resemble a ghostly face. This observation was made on 19 June 2019 in visible light by the telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys.Hide Caption 56 of 200A new SPHERE/VLT image of Hygiea, which could be the Solar System's smallest dwarf planet yet. As an object in the main asteroid belt, Hygiea satisfies right away three of the four requirements to be classified as a dwarf planet: it orbits around the Sun, it is not a moon and, unlike a planet, it has not cleared the neighbourhood around its orbit. The final requirement is that it have enough mass that its own gravity pulls it into a roughly spherical shape. This is what VLT observations have now revealed about Hygiea.A new SPHERE/VLT image of Hygiea, which could be the Solar System's smallest dwarf planet yet. As an object in the main asteroid belt, Hygiea satisfies right away three of the four requirements to be classified as a dwarf planet: it orbits around the Sun, it is not a moon and, unlike a planet, it has not cleared the neighbourhood around its orbit. The final requirement is that it have enough mass that its own gravity pulls it into a roughly spherical shape. This is what VLT observations have now revealed about Hygiea. Photos: Wonders of the universeA new SPHERE/VLT image of Hygiea, which could be the Solar System’s smallest dwarf planet yet. As an object in the main asteroid belt, Hygiea satisfies right away three of the four requirements to be classified as a dwarf planet: it orbits around the Sun, it is not a moon and, unlike a planet, it has not cleared the neighbourhood around its orbit. The final requirement is that it have enough mass that its own gravity pulls it into a roughly spherical shape. This is what VLT observations have now revealed about Hygiea.Hide Caption 57 of 200This is an artist's rendering of what a massive galaxy from the early universe might look like. The rendering shows that star formation in the galaxy is lighting up the surrounding gas. Image by James Josephides/Swinburne Astronomy Productions, Christina Williams/University of Arizona and Ivo Labbe/Swinburne.This is an artist's rendering of what a massive galaxy from the early universe might look like. The rendering shows that star formation in the galaxy is lighting up the surrounding gas. Image by James Josephides/Swinburne Astronomy Productions, Christina Williams/University of Arizona and Ivo Labbe/Swinburne. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s rendering of what a massive galaxy from the early universe might look like. The rendering shows that star formation in the galaxy is lighting up the surrounding gas. Image by James Josephides/Swinburne Astronomy Productions, Christina Williams/University of Arizona and Ivo Labbe/Swinburne.Hide Caption 58 of 200This is an artist's illustration of gas and dust disk around the star HD 163296. Gaps in the disk are likely the location of baby planets that are forming.This is an artist's illustration of gas and dust disk around the star HD 163296. Gaps in the disk are likely the location of baby planets that are forming. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s illustration of gas and dust disk around the star HD 163296. Gaps in the disk are likely the location of baby planets that are forming.Hide Caption 59 of 200This is a two-color composite image of comet 2I/Borisov captured by the Gemini North telescope on September 10.This is a two-color composite image of comet 2I/Borisov captured by the Gemini North telescope on September 10. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is a two-color composite image of comet 2I/Borisov captured by the Gemini North telescope on September 10.Hide Caption 60 of 200This illustration shows a young, forming planet in a "baby-proof" star system.This illustration shows a young, forming planet in a "baby-proof" star system. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis illustration shows a young, forming planet in a “baby-proof” star system.Hide Caption 61 of 200Using a simulation, astronomers shed light on the faint gaseous filaments that comprise the cosmic web in a massive galaxy cluster.Using a simulation, astronomers shed light on the faint gaseous filaments that comprise the cosmic web in a massive galaxy cluster. Photos: Wonders of the universeUsing a simulation, astronomers shed light on the faint gaseous filaments that comprise the cosmic web in a massive galaxy cluster.Hide Caption 62 of 200The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera  observed Saturn in June as the planet made its closest approach to Earth this year, at approximately 1.36 billion kilometers away.The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera  observed Saturn in June as the planet made its closest approach to Earth this year, at approximately 1.36 billion kilometers away. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera observed Saturn in June as the planet made its closest approach to Earth this year, at approximately 1.36 billion kilometers away.Hide Caption 63 of 200An artist's impression of the massive bursts of ionizing radiation exploding from the center of the Milky Way and impacting the Magellanic Stream.An artist's impression of the massive bursts of ionizing radiation exploding from the center of the Milky Way and impacting the Magellanic Stream. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s impression of the massive bursts of ionizing radiation exploding from the center of the Milky Way and impacting the Magellanic Stream.Hide Caption 64 of 200The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array captured this unprecedented image of two circumstellar disks, in which baby stars are growing, feeding off material from their surrounding birth disk. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array captured this unprecedented image of two circumstellar disks, in which baby stars are growing, feeding off material from their surrounding birth disk. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array captured this unprecedented image of two circumstellar disks, in which baby stars are growing, feeding off material from their surrounding birth disk. Hide Caption 65 of 200This is an artist's illustration of what a Neptune-size moon would look like orbiting the gas giant exoplanet Kepler-1625b in a star system 8,000 light-years from Earth. It could be the first exomoon ever discovered.This is an artist's illustration of what a Neptune-size moon would look like orbiting the gas giant exoplanet Kepler-1625b in a star system 8,000 light-years from Earth. It could be the first exomoon ever discovered. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s illustration of what a Neptune-size moon would look like orbiting the gas giant exoplanet Kepler-1625b in a star system 8,000 light-years from Earth. It could be the first exomoon ever discovered.Hide Caption 66 of 200This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a cloud of gas and dust full of bubbles, which are inflated by wind and radiation from massive young stars. Each bubble is filled with hundreds to thousands of stars, which form from dense clouds of gas and dust.This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a cloud of gas and dust full of bubbles, which are inflated by wind and radiation from massive young stars. Each bubble is filled with hundreds to thousands of stars, which form from dense clouds of gas and dust. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis infrared image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope shows a cloud of gas and dust full of bubbles, which are inflated by wind and radiation from massive young stars. Each bubble is filled with hundreds to thousands of stars, which form from dense clouds of gas and dust.Hide Caption 67 of 200This is an artist's impression of the path of the fast radio burst FRB 181112 traveling from a distant host galaxy to reach the Earth. It passed through the halo of a galaxy on the way.This is an artist's impression of the path of the fast radio burst FRB 181112 traveling from a distant host galaxy to reach the Earth. It passed through the halo of a galaxy on the way. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s impression of the path of the fast radio burst FRB 181112 traveling from a distant host galaxy to reach the Earth. It passed through the halo of a galaxy on the way.Hide Caption 68 of 200After passing too close to a supermassive black hole, the star in this artist's conception is torn into a thin stream of gas, which is then pulled back around the black hole and slams into itself, creating a bright shock and ejecting more hot material.After passing too close to a supermassive black hole, the star in this artist's conception is torn into a thin stream of gas, which is then pulled back around the black hole and slams into itself, creating a bright shock and ejecting more hot material. Photos: Wonders of the universeAfter passing too close to a supermassive black hole, the star in this artist’s conception is torn into a thin stream of gas, which is then pulled back around the black hole and slams into itself, creating a bright shock and ejecting more hot material.Hide Caption 69 of 200Comparison of GJ 3512 to the Solar System and other nearby red-dwarf planetary systems. Planets around a solar-mass stars can grow until they start accreting gas and become giant planets such as Jupiter, in a few millions of years. But we thought that small stars such asProxima, TRAPPIST-1, TeegardernÕs star and GJ 3512, could not form Jupiter mass planets.Comparison of GJ 3512 to the Solar System and other nearby red-dwarf planetary systems. Planets around a solar-mass stars can grow until they start accreting gas and become giant planets such as Jupiter, in a few millions of years. But we thought that small stars such asProxima, TRAPPIST-1, TeegardernÕs star and GJ 3512, could not form Jupiter mass planets. Photos: Wonders of the universeComparison of GJ 3512 to the Solar System and other nearby red-dwarf planetary systems. Planets around a solar-mass stars can grow until they start accreting gas and become giant planets such as Jupiter, in a few millions of years. But we thought that small stars such asProxima, TRAPPIST-1, TeegardernÕs star and GJ 3512, could not form Jupiter mass planets.Hide Caption 70 of 200A collision of three galaxies has set three supermassive black holes on a crash course with each other in a system one billion light-years from Earth. A collision of three galaxies has set three supermassive black holes on a crash course with each other in a system one billion light-years from Earth. Photos: Wonders of the universeA collision of three galaxies has set three supermassive black holes on a crash course with each other in a system one billion light-years from Earth. Hide Caption 71 of 200 2I/Borisov is the first interstellar comet observed in our solar system and only the second observed interstellar visitor to our solar system.  2I/Borisov is the first interstellar comet observed in our solar system and only the second observed interstellar visitor to our solar system. Photos: Wonders of the universe 2I/Borisov is the first interstellar comet observed in our solar system and only the second observed interstellar visitor to our solar system. Hide Caption 72 of 200KIC 8462852, also known as Boyajian's Star or Tabby's Star, is 1,000 light-years from us. It's 50% bigger than our sun and 1,000 degrees hotter. And it doesn't behave like any other star, dimming and brightening sporadically. Dust around the star, depicted here in an artist's illustration, may be the most likely cause of its strange behavior.KIC 8462852, also known as Boyajian's Star or Tabby's Star, is 1,000 light-years from us. It's 50% bigger than our sun and 1,000 degrees hotter. And it doesn't behave like any other star, dimming and brightening sporadically. Dust around the star, depicted here in an artist's illustration, may be the most likely cause of its strange behavior. Photos: Wonders of the universeKIC 8462852, also known as Boyajian’s Star or Tabby’s Star, is 1,000 light-years from us. It’s 50% bigger than our sun and 1,000 degrees hotter. And it doesn’t behave like any other star, dimming and brightening sporadically. Dust around the star, depicted here in an artist’s illustration, may be the most likely cause of its strange behavior.Hide Caption 73 of 200This is an artist's impression of a massive neutron star's pulse being delayed by the passage of a white dwarf star between the neutron star and Earth. Astronomers have detected the most massive neutron star to date due to this delay.This is an artist's impression of a massive neutron star's pulse being delayed by the passage of a white dwarf star between the neutron star and Earth. Astronomers have detected the most massive neutron star to date due to this delay. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s impression of a massive neutron star’s pulse being delayed by the passage of a white dwarf star between the neutron star and Earth. Astronomers have detected the most massive neutron star to date due to this delay.Hide Caption 74 of 200The European Southern Observatory's VISTA telescope captured a stunning image of the Large Magellanic Cloud, one of our nearest galactic neighbors. The near-infrared capability of the telescope showcases millions of individual stars.The European Southern Observatory's VISTA telescope captured a stunning image of the Large Magellanic Cloud, one of our nearest galactic neighbors. The near-infrared capability of the telescope showcases millions of individual stars. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe European Southern Observatory’s VISTA telescope captured a stunning image of the Large Magellanic Cloud, one of our nearest galactic neighbors. The near-infrared capability of the telescope showcases millions of individual stars.Hide Caption 75 of 200Astronomers believe Comet C/2019 Q4 could be the second known interstellar visitor to our solar system. It was first spotted on August 30 and imaged by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Hawaii's Big Island on September 10, 2019. Astronomers believe Comet C/2019 Q4 could be the second known interstellar visitor to our solar system. It was first spotted on August 30 and imaged by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Hawaii's Big Island on September 10, 2019. Photos: Wonders of the universeAstronomers believe Comet C/2019 Q4 could be the second known interstellar visitor to our solar system. It was first spotted on August 30 and imaged by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Hawaii’s Big Island on September 10, 2019. Hide Caption 76 of 200A star known as S0-2, represented as the blue and green object in this artist's illustration, made its closest approach to the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way in 2018. This provided a test for Einstein's theory of general relativity.A star known as S0-2, represented as the blue and green object in this artist's illustration, made its closest approach to the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way in 2018. This provided a test for Einstein's theory of general relativity. Photos: Wonders of the universeA star known as S0-2, represented as the blue and green object in this artist’s illustration, made its closest approach to the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way in 2018. This provided a test for Einstein’s theory of general relativity.Hide Caption 77 of 200This is a radio image of the Milky Way's galactic center. The radio bubbles discovered by MeerKAT extend vertically above and below the plane of the galaxy. This is a radio image of the Milky Way's galactic center. The radio bubbles discovered by MeerKAT extend vertically above and below the plane of the galaxy. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is a radio image of the Milky Way’s galactic center. The radio bubbles discovered by MeerKAT extend vertically above and below the plane of the galaxy. Hide Caption 78 of 200A kilanova was captured by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2016, seen here next to the red arrow. Kilanovae are massive explosions that create heavy elements like gold and platinum. A kilanova was captured by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2016, seen here next to the red arrow. Kilanovae are massive explosions that create heavy elements like gold and platinum. Photos: Wonders of the universeA kilanova was captured by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2016, seen here next to the red arrow. Kilanovae are massive explosions that create heavy elements like gold and platinum. Hide Caption 79 of 200This is an artist's depiction of a black hole about to swallow a neutron star. Detectors signaled this possible event on August 14.This is an artist's depiction of a black hole about to swallow a neutron star. Detectors signaled this possible event on August 14. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s depiction of a black hole about to swallow a neutron star. Detectors signaled this possible event on August 14.Hide Caption 80 of 200This artist's illustration shows LHS 3844b, a rocky nearby exoplanet. It's 1.3 times the mass of Earth and orbits a cool M-dwarf star. The planet's surface is probably dark and covered in cooled volcanic material, and there is no detectable atmosphere. This artist's illustration shows LHS 3844b, a rocky nearby exoplanet. It's 1.3 times the mass of Earth and orbits a cool M-dwarf star. The planet's surface is probably dark and covered in cooled volcanic material, and there is no detectable atmosphere. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis artist’s illustration shows LHS 3844b, a rocky nearby exoplanet. It’s 1.3 times the mass of Earth and orbits a cool M-dwarf star. The planet’s surface is probably dark and covered in cooled volcanic material, and there is no detectable atmosphere. Hide Caption 81 of 200An artist's concept of the explosion of a massive star within a dense stellar environment.An artist's concept of the explosion of a massive star within a dense stellar environment. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s concept of the explosion of a massive star within a dense stellar environment.Hide Caption 82 of 200Galaxy NGC 5866 is 44 million light-years from Earth. It appears flat because we can only see its edge in this image captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.Galaxy NGC 5866 is 44 million light-years from Earth. It appears flat because we can only see its edge in this image captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Photos: Wonders of the universeGalaxy NGC 5866 is 44 million light-years from Earth. It appears flat because we can only see its edge in this image captured by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope.Hide Caption 83 of 200The Hubble Space Telescope took a dazzling new portrait of Jupiter, showcasing its vivid colors and swirling cloud features in the atmosphere.The Hubble Space Telescope took a dazzling new portrait of Jupiter, showcasing its vivid colors and swirling cloud features in the atmosphere. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Hubble Space Telescope took a dazzling new portrait of Jupiter, showcasing its vivid colors and swirling cloud features in the atmosphere.Hide Caption 84 of 200This is an artist's impression of the ancient massive and distant galaxies observed with ALMA. This is an artist's impression of the ancient massive and distant galaxies observed with ALMA. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s impression of the ancient massive and distant galaxies observed with ALMA. Hide Caption 85 of 200Glowing gas clouds and newborn stars make up the Seagull Nebula in one of the Milky Way galaxy's spiral arms.Glowing gas clouds and newborn stars make up the Seagull Nebula in one of the Milky Way galaxy's spiral arms. Photos: Wonders of the universeGlowing gas clouds and newborn stars make up the Seagull Nebula in one of the Milky Way galaxy’s spiral arms.Hide Caption 86 of 200An artist's concept of what the first stars looked like soon after the Big Bang.An artist's concept of what the first stars looked like soon after the Big Bang. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s concept of what the first stars looked like soon after the Big Bang.Hide Caption 87 of 200Spiral galaxy NGC 2985 lies roughly over 70 million light years from our solar system in the constellation of Ursa Major. Spiral galaxy NGC 2985 lies roughly over 70 million light years from our solar system in the constellation of Ursa Major. Photos: Wonders of the universeSpiral galaxy NGC 2985 lies roughly over 70 million light years from our solar system in the constellation of Ursa Major. Hide Caption 88 of 200Early in the history of the universe, the Milky Way galaxy collided with a dwarf galaxy, left, which helped form our galaxy's ring and structure as it's known today.Early in the history of the universe, the Milky Way galaxy collided with a dwarf galaxy, left, which helped form our galaxy's ring and structure as it's known today. Photos: Wonders of the universeEarly in the history of the universe, the Milky Way galaxy collided with a dwarf galaxy, left, which helped form our galaxy’s ring and structure as it’s known today.Hide Caption 89 of 200An artist's illustration of a thin disc embedded in a supermassive black hole at the center of spiral galaxy NGC 3147, 130 million light-years away.An artist's illustration of a thin disc embedded in a supermassive black hole at the center of spiral galaxy NGC 3147, 130 million light-years away. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s illustration of a thin disc embedded in a supermassive black hole at the center of spiral galaxy NGC 3147, 130 million light-years away.Hide Caption 90 of 200Hubble captured this view of a spiral galaxy named NGC 972 that appears to be blooming with new star formation. The orange glow is created as hydrogen gas reacts to the intense light streaming outwards from nearby newborn stars.Hubble captured this view of a spiral galaxy named NGC 972 that appears to be blooming with new star formation. The orange glow is created as hydrogen gas reacts to the intense light streaming outwards from nearby newborn stars. Photos: Wonders of the universeHubble captured this view of a spiral galaxy named NGC 972 that appears to be blooming with new star formation. The orange glow is created as hydrogen gas reacts to the intense light streaming outwards from nearby newborn stars.Hide Caption 91 of 200This is jellyfish galaxy JO201.This is jellyfish galaxy JO201. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is jellyfish galaxy JO201.Hide Caption 92 of 200The Eta Carinae star system, located 7,500 light-years from Earth, experienced a great explosion in 1838 and the Hubble Space Telescope is still capturing the aftermath. This new ultraviolet image reveals the warm glowing gas clouds that resemble fireworks. The Eta Carinae star system, located 7,500 light-years from Earth, experienced a great explosion in 1838 and the Hubble Space Telescope is still capturing the aftermath. This new ultraviolet image reveals the warm glowing gas clouds that resemble fireworks. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Eta Carinae star system, located 7,500 light-years from Earth, experienced a great explosion in 1838 and the Hubble Space Telescope is still capturing the aftermath. This new ultraviolet image reveals the warm glowing gas clouds that resemble fireworks. Hide Caption 93 of 200'Oumuamua, the first observed interstellar visitor to our solar system, is shown in an artist's illustration.'Oumuamua, the first observed interstellar visitor to our solar system, is shown in an artist's illustration. Photos: Wonders of the universe’Oumuamua, the first observed interstellar visitor to our solar system, is shown in an artist’s illustration.Hide Caption 94 of 200This is an artist's rendering of ancient supernovae that bombarded Earth with cosmic energy millions of years ago. This is an artist's rendering of ancient supernovae that bombarded Earth with cosmic energy millions of years ago. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s rendering of ancient supernovae that bombarded Earth with cosmic energy millions of years ago. Hide Caption 95 of 200An artist's impression of CSIRO's Australian SKA Pathfinder radio telescope finding a fast radio burst and determining its precise location. An artist's impression of CSIRO's Australian SKA Pathfinder radio telescope finding a fast radio burst and determining its precise location. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s impression of CSIRO’s Australian SKA Pathfinder radio telescope finding a fast radio burst and determining its precise location. Hide Caption 96 of 200The Whirlpool galaxy has been captured in different light wavelengths. On the left is a visible light image. The next image combines visible and infrared light, while the two on the right show different wavelengths of infrared light.The Whirlpool galaxy has been captured in different light wavelengths. On the left is a visible light image. The next image combines visible and infrared light, while the two on the right show different wavelengths of infrared light. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Whirlpool galaxy has been captured in different light wavelengths. On the left is a visible light image. The next image combines visible and infrared light, while the two on the right show different wavelengths of infrared light.Hide Caption 97 of 200Electrically charged C60 molecules, in which 60 carbon atoms are arranged in a hollow sphere that resembles a soccer ball, was found by the Hubble Space Telescope in the interstellar medium between star systems. Electrically charged C60 molecules, in which 60 carbon atoms are arranged in a hollow sphere that resembles a soccer ball, was found by the Hubble Space Telescope in the interstellar medium between star systems. Photos: Wonders of the universeElectrically charged C60 molecules, in which 60 carbon atoms are arranged in a hollow sphere that resembles a soccer ball, was found by the Hubble Space Telescope in the interstellar medium between star systems. Hide Caption 98 of 200These are magnified galaxies behind large galaxy clusters. The pink halos reveal the gas surrounding the distant galaxies and its structure. The gravitational lensing effect of the clusters multiplies the images of the galaxies.These are magnified galaxies behind large galaxy clusters. The pink halos reveal the gas surrounding the distant galaxies and its structure. The gravitational lensing effect of the clusters multiplies the images of the galaxies. Photos: Wonders of the universeThese are magnified galaxies behind large galaxy clusters. The pink halos reveal the gas surrounding the distant galaxies and its structure. The gravitational lensing effect of the clusters multiplies the images of the galaxies.Hide Caption 99 of 200This artist's illustration shows a blue quasar at the center of a galaxy.This artist's illustration shows a blue quasar at the center of a galaxy. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis artist’s illustration shows a blue quasar at the center of a galaxy.Hide Caption 100 of 200The NICER detector on the International Space Station recorded 22 months of nighttime X-ray data to create this map of the entire sky. The NICER detector on the International Space Station recorded 22 months of nighttime X-ray data to create this map of the entire sky. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe NICER detector on the International Space Station recorded 22 months of nighttime X-ray data to create this map of the entire sky. Hide Caption 101 of 200NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope captured this mosaic of the star-forming Cepheus C and Cepheus B regions. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope captured this mosaic of the star-forming Cepheus C and Cepheus B regions. Photos: Wonders of the universeNASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope captured this mosaic of the star-forming Cepheus C and Cepheus B regions. Hide Caption 102 of 200Galaxy NGC 4485 collided with its larger galactic neighbor NGC 4490 millions of years ago, leading to the creation of new stars seen in the right side of the image.Galaxy NGC 4485 collided with its larger galactic neighbor NGC 4490 millions of years ago, leading to the creation of new stars seen in the right side of the image. Photos: Wonders of the universeGalaxy NGC 4485 collided with its larger galactic neighbor NGC 4490 millions of years ago, leading to the creation of new stars seen in the right side of the image.Hide Caption 103 of 200Astronomers developed a mosaic of the distant universe, called the Hubble Legacy Field, that documents 16 years of observations from the Hubble Space Telescope. The image contains 200,000 galaxies that stretch back through 13.3 billion years of time to just 500 million years after the Big Bang. Astronomers developed a mosaic of the distant universe, called the Hubble Legacy Field, that documents 16 years of observations from the Hubble Space Telescope. The image contains 200,000 galaxies that stretch back through 13.3 billion years of time to just 500 million years after the Big Bang. Photos: Wonders of the universeAstronomers developed a mosaic of the distant universe, called the Hubble Legacy Field, that documents 16 years of observations from the Hubble Space Telescope. The image contains 200,000 galaxies that stretch back through 13.3 billion years of time to just 500 million years after the Big Bang. Hide Caption 104 of 200A ground-based telescope's view of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a neighboring galaxy of our Milky Way. The inset was taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and shows one of the star clusters in the galaxy.A ground-based telescope's view of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a neighboring galaxy of our Milky Way. The inset was taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and shows one of the star clusters in the galaxy. Photos: Wonders of the universeA ground-based telescope’s view of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a neighboring galaxy of our Milky Way. The inset was taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and shows one of the star clusters in the galaxy.Hide Caption 105 of 200wonders of the universe 0419wonders of the universe 0419 Photos: Wonders of the universeHide Caption 106 of 200One of the brightest planetary nebulae on the sky and first discovered in 1878, nebula NGC 7027 can be seen toward the constellation of the Swan.One of the brightest planetary nebulae on the sky and first discovered in 1878, nebula NGC 7027 can be seen toward the constellation of the Swan. Photos: Wonders of the universeOne of the brightest planetary nebulae on the sky and first discovered in 1878, nebula NGC 7027 can be seen toward the constellation of the Swan.Hide Caption 107 of 200The asteroid 6478 Gault is seen with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, showing two narrow, comet-like tails of debris that tell us that the asteroid is slowly undergoing self-destruction. The bright streaks surrounding the asteroid are background stars. The Gault asteroid is located 214 million miles from the Sun, between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.The asteroid 6478 Gault is seen with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, showing two narrow, comet-like tails of debris that tell us that the asteroid is slowly undergoing self-destruction. The bright streaks surrounding the asteroid are background stars. The Gault asteroid is located 214 million miles from the Sun, between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe asteroid 6478 Gault is seen with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, showing two narrow, comet-like tails of debris that tell us that the asteroid is slowly undergoing self-destruction. The bright streaks surrounding the asteroid are background stars. The Gault asteroid is located 214 million miles from the Sun, between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.Hide Caption 108 of 200The ghostly shell in this image is a supernova, and the glowing trail leading away from it is a pulsar.The ghostly shell in this image is a supernova, and the glowing trail leading away from it is a pulsar. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe ghostly shell in this image is a supernova, and the glowing trail leading away from it is a pulsar.Hide Caption 109 of 200Hidden in one of the darkest corners of the Orion constellation, this Cosmic Bat is spreading its hazy wings through interstellar space two thousand light-years away. It is illuminated by the young stars nestled in its core — despite being shrouded by opaque clouds of dust, their bright rays still illuminate the nebula. Hidden in one of the darkest corners of the Orion constellation, this Cosmic Bat is spreading its hazy wings through interstellar space two thousand light-years away. It is illuminated by the young stars nestled in its core — despite being shrouded by opaque clouds of dust, their bright rays still illuminate the nebula. Photos: Wonders of the universeHidden in one of the darkest corners of the Orion constellation, this Cosmic Bat is spreading its hazy wings through interstellar space two thousand light-years away. It is illuminated by the young stars nestled in its core — despite being shrouded by opaque clouds of dust, their bright rays still illuminate the nebula. Hide Caption 110 of 200In this illustration, several dust rings circle the sun. These rings form when planets' gravities tug dust grains into orbit around the sun. Recently, scientists have detected a dust ring at Mercury's orbit. Others hypothesize the source of Venus' dust ring is a group of never-before-detected co-orbital asteroids.In this illustration, several dust rings circle the sun. These rings form when planets' gravities tug dust grains into orbit around the sun. Recently, scientists have detected a dust ring at Mercury's orbit. Others hypothesize the source of Venus' dust ring is a group of never-before-detected co-orbital asteroids. Photos: Wonders of the universeIn this illustration, several dust rings circle the sun. These rings form when planets’ gravities tug dust grains into orbit around the sun. Recently, scientists have detected a dust ring at Mercury’s orbit. Others hypothesize the source of Venus’ dust ring is a group of never-before-detected co-orbital asteroids.Hide Caption 111 of 200This is an artist's impression of globular star clusters surrounding the Milky Way. This is an artist's impression of globular star clusters surrounding the Milky Way. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s impression of globular star clusters surrounding the Milky Way. Hide Caption 112 of 200An artist's impression of life on a planet in orbit around a binary star system, visible as two suns in the sky. An artist's impression of life on a planet in orbit around a binary star system, visible as two suns in the sky. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s impression of life on a planet in orbit around a binary star system, visible as two suns in the sky. Hide Caption 113 of 200An artist's illustration of one of the most distant solar system objects yet observed, 2018 VG18 -- also known as "Farout." The pink hue suggests the presence of ice. We don't yet have an idea of what "FarFarOut" looks like. An artist's illustration of one of the most distant solar system objects yet observed, 2018 VG18 -- also known as "Farout." The pink hue suggests the presence of ice. We don't yet have an idea of what "FarFarOut" looks like. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s illustration of one of the most distant solar system objects yet observed, 2018 VG18 — also known as “Farout.” The pink hue suggests the presence of ice. We don’t yet have an idea of what “FarFarOut” looks like. Hide Caption 114 of 200This is an artist's concept of the tiny moon Hippocamp that was discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope. Only 20 miles across, it may actually be a broken-off fragment from a much larger neighboring moon, Proteus, seen as a crescent in the background. This is an artist's concept of the tiny moon Hippocamp that was discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope. Only 20 miles across, it may actually be a broken-off fragment from a much larger neighboring moon, Proteus, seen as a crescent in the background. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s concept of the tiny moon Hippocamp that was discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope. Only 20 miles across, it may actually be a broken-off fragment from a much larger neighboring moon, Proteus, seen as a crescent in the background. Hide Caption 115 of 200In this illustration, an asteroid (bottom left) breaks apart under the powerful gravity of LSPM J0207+3331, the oldest, coldest white dwarf known to be surrounded by a ring of dusty debris. Scientists think the system's infrared signal is best explained by two distinct rings composed of dust supplied by crumbling asteroids.In this illustration, an asteroid (bottom left) breaks apart under the powerful gravity of LSPM J0207+3331, the oldest, coldest white dwarf known to be surrounded by a ring of dusty debris. Scientists think the system's infrared signal is best explained by two distinct rings composed of dust supplied by crumbling asteroids. Photos: Wonders of the universeIn this illustration, an asteroid (bottom left) breaks apart under the powerful gravity of LSPM J0207+3331, the oldest, coldest white dwarf known to be surrounded by a ring of dusty debris. Scientists think the system’s infrared signal is best explained by two distinct rings composed of dust supplied by crumbling asteroids.Hide Caption 116 of 200An artist's impression of the warped and twisted Milky Way disk. This happens when the rotational forces of the massive center of the galaxy tug on the outer disk.An artist's impression of the warped and twisted Milky Way disk. This happens when the rotational forces of the massive center of the galaxy tug on the outer disk. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s impression of the warped and twisted Milky Way disk. This happens when the rotational forces of the massive center of the galaxy tug on the outer disk.Hide Caption 117 of 200This 1.3-kilometer (0.8-mile)-radius Kuiper Belt Object discovered by researchers on the edge of the solar system is believed to be the step between balls of dust and ice and fully formed planets.This 1.3-kilometer (0.8-mile)-radius Kuiper Belt Object discovered by researchers on the edge of the solar system is believed to be the step between balls of dust and ice and fully formed planets. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis 1.3-kilometer (0.8-mile)-radius Kuiper Belt Object discovered by researchers on the edge of the solar system is believed to be the step between balls of dust and ice and fully formed planets.Hide Caption 118 of 200A selfie taken by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover on Vera Rubin Ridge before it moves to a new location.A selfie taken by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover on Vera Rubin Ridge before it moves to a new location. Photos: Wonders of the universeA selfie taken by NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover on Vera Rubin Ridge before it moves to a new location.Hide Caption 119 of 200The Hubble Space Telescope found a dwarf galaxy hiding behind a big star cluster that's in our cosmic neighborhood. It's so old and pristine that researchers have dubbed it a "living fossil" from the early universe.The Hubble Space Telescope found a dwarf galaxy hiding behind a big star cluster that's in our cosmic neighborhood. It's so old and pristine that researchers have dubbed it a "living fossil" from the early universe. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Hubble Space Telescope found a dwarf galaxy hiding behind a big star cluster that’s in our cosmic neighborhood. It’s so old and pristine that researchers have dubbed it a “living fossil” from the early universe.Hide Caption 120 of 200How did massive black holes form in the early universe? The rotating gaseous disk of this dark matter halo breaks apart into three clumps that collapse under their own gravity to form supermassive stars. Those stars will quickly collapse and form massive black holes.How did massive black holes form in the early universe? The rotating gaseous disk of this dark matter halo breaks apart into three clumps that collapse under their own gravity to form supermassive stars. Those stars will quickly collapse and form massive black holes. Photos: Wonders of the universeHow did massive black holes form in the early universe? The rotating gaseous disk of this dark matter halo breaks apart into three clumps that collapse under their own gravity to form supermassive stars. Those stars will quickly collapse and form massive black holes.Hide Caption 121 of 200NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope captured this image of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our own Milky Way galaxy. Astrophysicists now believe it could collide with our galaxy in two billion years.NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope captured this image of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our own Milky Way galaxy. Astrophysicists now believe it could collide with our galaxy in two billion years. Photos: Wonders of the universeNASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope captured this image of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our own Milky Way galaxy. Astrophysicists now believe it could collide with our galaxy in two billion years.Hide Caption 122 of 200A mysterious bright object in the sky, dubbed "The Cow," was captured in real time by telescopes around the world. Astronomers believe that it could be the birth of a black hole or neutron star, or a new class of object.A mysterious bright object in the sky, dubbed "The Cow," was captured in real time by telescopes around the world. Astronomers believe that it could be the birth of a black hole or neutron star, or a new class of object. Photos: Wonders of the universeA mysterious bright object in the sky, dubbed “The Cow,” was captured in real time by telescopes around the world. Astronomers believe that it could be the birth of a black hole or neutron star, or a new class of object.Hide Caption 123 of 200An illustration depicts the detection of a repeating fast radio burst from a mysterious source 3 billion light-years from Earth. An illustration depicts the detection of a repeating fast radio burst from a mysterious source 3 billion light-years from Earth. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn illustration depicts the detection of a repeating fast radio burst from a mysterious source 3 billion light-years from Earth. Hide Caption 124 of 200Comet 46P/Wirtanen will pass within 7 million miles of Earth on December 16. It's ghostly green coma is the size of Jupiter, even though the comet itself is about three-quarters of a mile in diameter.Comet 46P/Wirtanen will pass within 7 million miles of Earth on December 16. It's ghostly green coma is the size of Jupiter, even though the comet itself is about three-quarters of a mile in diameter. Photos: Wonders of the universeComet 46P/Wirtanen will pass within 7 million miles of Earth on December 16. It’s ghostly green coma is the size of Jupiter, even though the comet itself is about three-quarters of a mile in diameter.Hide Caption 125 of 200This mosaic image of asteroid Bennu is composed of 12 PolyCam images collected on December 2 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles.This mosaic image of asteroid Bennu is composed of 12 PolyCam images collected on December 2 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis mosaic image of asteroid Bennu is composed of 12 PolyCam images collected on December 2 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles.Hide Caption 126 of 200This image of a globular cluster of stars by the Hubble Space Telescope is one of the most ancient collections of stars known. The cluster, called NGC 6752, is more than 10 billion years old. This image of a globular cluster of stars by the Hubble Space Telescope is one of the most ancient collections of stars known. The cluster, called NGC 6752, is more than 10 billion years old. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis image of a globular cluster of stars by the Hubble Space Telescope is one of the most ancient collections of stars known. The cluster, called NGC 6752, is more than 10 billion years old. Hide Caption 127 of 200An image of Apep captured with the VISIR camera on the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. This "pinwheel" star system is most likely doomed to end in a long-duration gamma-ray burst.An image of Apep captured with the VISIR camera on the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. This "pinwheel" star system is most likely doomed to end in a long-duration gamma-ray burst. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn image of Apep captured with the VISIR camera on the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope. This “pinwheel” star system is most likely doomed to end in a long-duration gamma-ray burst.Hide Caption 128 of 200An artist's impression of galaxy Abell 2597, showing the supermassive black hole expelling cold molecular gas like the pump of a giant intergalactic fountain.An artist's impression of galaxy Abell 2597, showing the supermassive black hole expelling cold molecular gas like the pump of a giant intergalactic fountain. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s impression of galaxy Abell 2597, showing the supermassive black hole expelling cold molecular gas like the pump of a giant intergalactic fountain.Hide Caption 129 of 200An image of the Wild Duck Cluster, where every star is roughly 250 million years old.An image of the Wild Duck Cluster, where every star is roughly 250 million years old. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn image of the Wild Duck Cluster, where every star is roughly 250 million years old.Hide Caption 130 of 200These images reveal the final stage of a union between pairs of galactic nuclei in the messy cores of colliding galaxies. These images reveal the final stage of a union between pairs of galactic nuclei in the messy cores of colliding galaxies. Photos: Wonders of the universeThese images reveal the final stage of a union between pairs of galactic nuclei in the messy cores of colliding galaxies. Hide Caption 131 of 200A radio image of hydrogen gas in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Astronomers believe that the dwarf galaxy is slowly dying and will eventually be consumed by the Milky Way. A radio image of hydrogen gas in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Astronomers believe that the dwarf galaxy is slowly dying and will eventually be consumed by the Milky Way. Photos: Wonders of the universeA radio image of hydrogen gas in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Astronomers believe that the dwarf galaxy is slowly dying and will eventually be consumed by the Milky Way. Hide Caption 132 of 200Further evidence of a supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy has been found. This visualization uses data from simulations of orbital motions of gas swirling around about 30% of the speed of light on a circular orbit around the black hole.Further evidence of a supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy has been found. This visualization uses data from simulations of orbital motions of gas swirling around about 30% of the speed of light on a circular orbit around the black hole. Photos: Wonders of the universeFurther evidence of a supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy has been found. This visualization uses data from simulations of orbital motions of gas swirling around about 30% of the speed of light on a circular orbit around the black hole.Hide Caption 133 of 200Does this look like a bat to you? This giant shadow comes from a bright star reflecting against the dusty disk surrounding it.Does this look like a bat to you? This giant shadow comes from a bright star reflecting against the dusty disk surrounding it. Photos: Wonders of the universeDoes this look like a bat to you? This giant shadow comes from a bright star reflecting against the dusty disk surrounding it.Hide Caption 134 of 200Hey, Bennu! NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission, on its way to meet the primitive asteroid Bennu, is sending back images as it gets closer to its December 3 target.Hey, Bennu! NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission, on its way to meet the primitive asteroid Bennu, is sending back images as it gets closer to its December 3 target. Photos: Wonders of the universeHey, Bennu! NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission, on its way to meet the primitive asteroid Bennu, is sending back images as it gets closer to its December 3 target.Hide Caption 135 of 200These three panels reveal a supernova before, during and after it happened 920 million light-years from Earth(from left to right). The supernova, dubbed iPTF14gqr, is unusual because although the star was massive, its explosion was quick and faint. Researchers believe this is due to a companion star that siphoned away its mass.These three panels reveal a supernova before, during and after it happened 920 million light-years from Earth(from left to right). The supernova, dubbed iPTF14gqr, is unusual because although the star was massive, its explosion was quick and faint. Researchers believe this is due to a companion star that siphoned away its mass. Photos: Wonders of the universeThese three panels reveal a supernova before, during and after it happened 920 million light-years from Earth(from left to right). The supernova, dubbed iPTF14gqr, is unusual because although the star was massive, its explosion was quick and faint. Researchers believe this is due to a companion star that siphoned away its mass.Hide Caption 136 of 200An artist's illustration of Planet X, which could be shaping the orbits of smaller extremely distant outer solar system objects like 2015 TG387.An artist's illustration of Planet X, which could be shaping the orbits of smaller extremely distant outer solar system objects like 2015 TG387. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s illustration of Planet X, which could be shaping the orbits of smaller extremely distant outer solar system objects like 2015 TG387.Hide Caption 137 of 200This is an artist's concept of what SIMP J01365663+0933473 might look like. It has 12.7 times the mass of Jupiter but a magnetic field 200 times more powerful than Jupiter's. This object is 20 light-years from Earth. It's on the boundary line between being a planet or being a brown dwarf.This is an artist's concept of what SIMP J01365663+0933473 might look like. It has 12.7 times the mass of Jupiter but a magnetic field 200 times more powerful than Jupiter's. This object is 20 light-years from Earth. It's on the boundary line between being a planet or being a brown dwarf. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an artist’s concept of what SIMP J01365663+0933473 might look like. It has 12.7 times the mass of Jupiter but a magnetic field 200 times more powerful than Jupiter’s. This object is 20 light-years from Earth. It’s on the boundary line between being a planet or being a brown dwarf.Hide Caption 138 of 200The Andromeda galaxy cannibalized and shredded the once-large galaxy M32p, leaving behind this compact galaxy remnant known as M32. It is completely unique and contains a wealth of young stars.The Andromeda galaxy cannibalized and shredded the once-large galaxy M32p, leaving behind this compact galaxy remnant known as M32. It is completely unique and contains a wealth of young stars. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Andromeda galaxy cannibalized and shredded the once-large galaxy M32p, leaving behind this compact galaxy remnant known as M32. It is completely unique and contains a wealth of young stars.Hide Caption 139 of 200Twelve new moons have been found around Jupiter. This graphic shows various groupings of the moons and their orbits, with the newly discovered ones shown in bold.Twelve new moons have been found around Jupiter. This graphic shows various groupings of the moons and their orbits, with the newly discovered ones shown in bold. Photos: Wonders of the universeTwelve new moons have been found around Jupiter. This graphic shows various groupings of the moons and their orbits, with the newly discovered ones shown in bold.Hide Caption 140 of 200Scientists and observatories around the world were able to trace a high-energy neutrino to a galaxy with a supermassive, rapidly spinning black hole at its center, known as a blazar. The galaxy sits to the left of Orion's shoulder in his constellation and is about 4 billion light-years from Earth. Scientists and observatories around the world were able to trace a high-energy neutrino to a galaxy with a supermassive, rapidly spinning black hole at its center, known as a blazar. The galaxy sits to the left of Orion's shoulder in his constellation and is about 4 billion light-years from Earth. Photos: Wonders of the universeScientists and observatories around the world were able to trace a high-energy neutrino to a galaxy with a supermassive, rapidly spinning black hole at its center, known as a blazar. The galaxy sits to the left of Orion’s shoulder in his constellation and is about 4 billion light-years from Earth. Hide Caption 141 of 200Planets don't just appear out of thin air -- but they do require gas, dust and other processes not fully understood by astronomers. This is an artist's impression of what "infant" planets look like forming around a young star.Planets don't just appear out of thin air -- but they do require gas, dust and other processes not fully understood by astronomers. This is an artist's impression of what "infant" planets look like forming around a young star. Photos: Wonders of the universePlanets don’t just appear out of thin air — but they do require gas, dust and other processes not fully understood by astronomers. This is an artist’s impression of what “infant” planets look like forming around a young star.Hide Caption 142 of 200These negative images of 2015 BZ509, which is circled in yellow, show the first known interstellar object that has become a permanent part of our solar system. The exo-asteroid was likely pulled into our solar system from another star system 4.5 billion years ago. It then settled into a retrograde orbit around Jupiter.These negative images of 2015 BZ509, which is circled in yellow, show the first known interstellar object that has become a permanent part of our solar system. The exo-asteroid was likely pulled into our solar system from another star system 4.5 billion years ago. It then settled into a retrograde orbit around Jupiter. Photos: Wonders of the universeThese negative images of 2015 BZ509, which is circled in yellow, show the first known interstellar object that has become a permanent part of our solar system. The exo-asteroid was likely pulled into our solar system from another star system 4.5 billion years ago. It then settled into a retrograde orbit around Jupiter.Hide Caption 143 of 200A close look at the diamond matrix in a meteorite that landed in Sudan in 2008. This is considered to be the first evidence of a proto-planet that helped form the terrestrial planets in our solar system. A close look at the diamond matrix in a meteorite that landed in Sudan in 2008. This is considered to be the first evidence of a proto-planet that helped form the terrestrial planets in our solar system. Photos: Wonders of the universeA close look at the diamond matrix in a meteorite that landed in Sudan in 2008. This is considered to be the first evidence of a proto-planet that helped form the terrestrial planets in our solar system. Hide Caption 144 of 2002004 EW95 is the first carbon-rich asteroid confirmed to exist in the Kuiper Belt and a relic of the primordial solar system. This curious object probably formed in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter before being flung billions of miles to its current home in the Kuiper Belt.2004 EW95 is the first carbon-rich asteroid confirmed to exist in the Kuiper Belt and a relic of the primordial solar system. This curious object probably formed in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter before being flung billions of miles to its current home in the Kuiper Belt. Photos: Wonders of the universe2004 EW95 is the first carbon-rich asteroid confirmed to exist in the Kuiper Belt and a relic of the primordial solar system. This curious object probably formed in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter before being flung billions of miles to its current home in the Kuiper Belt.Hide Caption 145 of 200The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is celebrating its 28th anniversary in space with this stunning and colorful image of the Lagoon Nebula 4,000 light-years from Earth. While the whole nebula is 55 light-years across, this image only reveals a portion of about four light-years. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is celebrating its 28th anniversary in space with this stunning and colorful image of the Lagoon Nebula 4,000 light-years from Earth. While the whole nebula is 55 light-years across, this image only reveals a portion of about four light-years. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is celebrating its 28th anniversary in space with this stunning and colorful image of the Lagoon Nebula 4,000 light-years from Earth. While the whole nebula is 55 light-years across, this image only reveals a portion of about four light-years. Hide Caption 146 of 200This is a more star-filled view of the Lagoon Nebula, using Hubble's infrared capabilities. The reason you can see more stars is because infrared is able to cut through the dust and gas clouds to reveal the abundance of both young stars within the nebula, as well as more distant stars in the background. This is a more star-filled view of the Lagoon Nebula, using Hubble's infrared capabilities. The reason you can see more stars is because infrared is able to cut through the dust and gas clouds to reveal the abundance of both young stars within the nebula, as well as more distant stars in the background. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is a more star-filled view of the Lagoon Nebula, using Hubble’s infrared capabilities. The reason you can see more stars is because infrared is able to cut through the dust and gas clouds to reveal the abundance of both young stars within the nebula, as well as more distant stars in the background. Hide Caption 147 of 200The Rosette Nebula is 5,000 light-years from Earth. The distinctive nebula, which some claim looks more like a skull, has a hole in the middle that creates the illusion of its rose-like shape. The Rosette Nebula is 5,000 light-years from Earth. The distinctive nebula, which some claim looks more like a skull, has a hole in the middle that creates the illusion of its rose-like shape. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Rosette Nebula is 5,000 light-years from Earth. The distinctive nebula, which some claim looks more like a skull, has a hole in the middle that creates the illusion of its rose-like shape. Hide Caption 148 of 200This inner slope of a Martian crater has several of the seasonal dark streaks called "recurrent slope lineae," or RSL, that a November 2017 report interprets as granular flows, rather than darkening due to flowing water. The image is from the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.This inner slope of a Martian crater has several of the seasonal dark streaks called "recurrent slope lineae," or RSL, that a November 2017 report interprets as granular flows, rather than darkening due to flowing water. The image is from the HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis inner slope of a Martian crater has several of the seasonal dark streaks called “recurrent slope lineae,” or RSL, that a November 2017 report interprets as granular flows, rather than darkening due to flowing water. The image is from the HiRISE camera on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.Hide Caption 149 of 200This artist's impression shows a supernova explosion, which contains the luminosity of 100 million suns. Supernova iPTF14hls, which has exploded multiple times, may be the most massive and longest-lasting ever observed. This artist's impression shows a supernova explosion, which contains the luminosity of 100 million suns. Supernova iPTF14hls, which has exploded multiple times, may be the most massive and longest-lasting ever observed. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis artist’s impression shows a supernova explosion, which contains the luminosity of 100 million suns. Supernova iPTF14hls, which has exploded multiple times, may be the most massive and longest-lasting ever observed. Hide Caption 150 of 200This illustration shows hydrocarbon compounds splitting into carbon and hydrogen inside ice giants, such as Neptune, turning into a "diamond (rain) shower."This illustration shows hydrocarbon compounds splitting into carbon and hydrogen inside ice giants, such as Neptune, turning into a "diamond (rain) shower." Photos: Wonders of the universeThis illustration shows hydrocarbon compounds splitting into carbon and hydrogen inside ice giants, such as Neptune, turning into a “diamond (rain) shower.”Hide Caption 151 of 200This striking image is the stellar nursery in the Orion Nebula, where stars are born. The red filament is a stretch of ammonia molecules measuring 50 light-years long. The blue represents the gas of the Orion Nebula. This image is a composite of observation from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explore telescope. "We still don't understand in detail how large clouds of gas in our Galaxy collapse to form new stars," said Rachel Friesen, one of the collaboration's co-Principal Investigators. "But ammonia is an excellent tracer of dense, star-forming gas." This striking image is the stellar nursery in the Orion Nebula, where stars are born. The red filament is a stretch of ammonia molecules measuring 50 light-years long. The blue represents the gas of the Orion Nebula. This image is a composite of observation from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explore telescope. "We still don't understand in detail how large clouds of gas in our Galaxy collapse to form new stars," said Rachel Friesen, one of the collaboration's co-Principal Investigators. "But ammonia is an excellent tracer of dense, star-forming gas." Photos: Wonders of the universeThis striking image is the stellar nursery in the Orion Nebula, where stars are born. The red filament is a stretch of ammonia molecules measuring 50 light-years long. The blue represents the gas of the Orion Nebula. This image is a composite of observation from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explore telescope. “We still don’t understand in detail how large clouds of gas in our Galaxy collapse to form new stars,” said Rachel Friesen, one of the collaboration’s co-Principal Investigators. “But ammonia is an excellent tracer of dense, star-forming gas.” Hide Caption 152 of 200This is an illustration of the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft approaching the sun. The NASA probe <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/31/us/nasa-sun-mission/" target="_blank">will explore the sun's atmosphere</a> in a mission that begins in the summer of 2018.This is an illustration of the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft approaching the sun. The NASA probe <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/31/us/nasa-sun-mission/" target="_blank">will explore the sun's atmosphere</a> in a mission that begins in the summer of 2018. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is an illustration of the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft approaching the sun. The NASA probe will explore the sun’s atmosphere in a mission that begins in the summer of 2018.Hide Caption 153 of 200See that tiny dot between Saturn's rings? That's Earth, as seen by the Cassini mission on April 12, 2017. "Cassini was 870 million miles away from Earth when the image was taken," according to NASA. "Although far too small to be visible in the image, the part of Earth facing Cassini at the time was the southern Atlantic Ocean." Much like the famous <a href="https://www.nasa.gov/jpl/voyager/pale-blue-dot-images-turn-25" target="_blank">"pale blue dot"</a> image captured by Voyager 1 in 1990, we are but a point of light when viewed from the furthest planet in the solar system.See that tiny dot between Saturn's rings? That's Earth, as seen by the Cassini mission on April 12, 2017. "Cassini was 870 million miles away from Earth when the image was taken," according to NASA. "Although far too small to be visible in the image, the part of Earth facing Cassini at the time was the southern Atlantic Ocean." Much like the famous <a href="https://www.nasa.gov/jpl/voyager/pale-blue-dot-images-turn-25" target="_blank">"pale blue dot"</a> image captured by Voyager 1 in 1990, we are but a point of light when viewed from the furthest planet in the solar system. Photos: Wonders of the universeSee that tiny dot between Saturn’s rings? That’s Earth, as seen by the Cassini mission on April 12, 2017. “Cassini was 870 million miles away from Earth when the image was taken,” according to NASA. “Although far too small to be visible in the image, the part of Earth facing Cassini at the time was the southern Atlantic Ocean.” Much like the famous “pale blue dot” image captured by Voyager 1 in 1990, we are but a point of light when viewed from the furthest planet in the solar system.Hide Caption 154 of 200NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, using infrared technology, reveals the <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/04/01/us/milky-way-hubble-feat/index.html">density of stars in the Milky Way.</a> According to NASA, the photo -- stitched together from nine images -- contains more than a half-million stars. The star cluster is the densest in the galaxy. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, using infrared technology, reveals the <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/04/01/us/milky-way-hubble-feat/index.html">density of stars in the Milky Way.</a> According to NASA, the photo -- stitched together from nine images -- contains more than a half-million stars. The star cluster is the densest in the galaxy. Photos: Wonders of the universeNASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, using infrared technology, reveals the density of stars in the Milky Way. According to NASA, the photo — stitched together from nine images — contains more than a half-million stars. The star cluster is the densest in the galaxy. Hide Caption 155 of 200This photo of Saturn's large icy moon, Tethys, was taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, which sent back some<a href="http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/27/tech/gallery/cassinis-top-discoveries/" target="_blank"> jaw-dropping images</a> from the ringed planet. This photo of Saturn's large icy moon, Tethys, was taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, which sent back some<a href="http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/27/tech/gallery/cassinis-top-discoveries/" target="_blank"> jaw-dropping images</a> from the ringed planet. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis photo of Saturn’s large icy moon, Tethys, was taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, which sent back some jaw-dropping images from the ringed planet. Hide Caption 156 of 200This is what Earth and its moon look like from Mars. The image is a composite of the best Earth image and the best moon image taken on November 20, 2016, by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The orbiter's camera takes images in three wavelength bands: infrared, red and blue-green. Mars was about 127 million miles from Earth when the images were taken.This is what Earth and its moon look like from Mars. The image is a composite of the best Earth image and the best moon image taken on November 20, 2016, by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The orbiter's camera takes images in three wavelength bands: infrared, red and blue-green. Mars was about 127 million miles from Earth when the images were taken. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is what Earth and its moon look like from Mars. The image is a composite of the best Earth image and the best moon image taken on November 20, 2016, by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The orbiter’s camera takes images in three wavelength bands: infrared, red and blue-green. Mars was about 127 million miles from Earth when the images were taken.Hide Caption 157 of 200PGC 1000714 was initially thought to be a common elliptical galaxy, but a closer analysis revealed the incredibly rare discovery of a Hoag-type galaxy. It has a round core encircled by two detached rings.PGC 1000714 was initially thought to be a common elliptical galaxy, but a closer analysis revealed the incredibly rare discovery of a Hoag-type galaxy. It has a round core encircled by two detached rings. Photos: Wonders of the universePGC 1000714 was initially thought to be a common elliptical galaxy, but a closer analysis revealed the incredibly rare discovery of a Hoag-type galaxy. It has a round core encircled by two detached rings.Hide Caption 158 of 200NASA's Cassini spacecraft took these images of the planet's mysterious hexagon-shaped jetstream in December 2016. The hexagon was discovered in images taken by the Voyager spacecraft in the early 1980s. It's estimated to have a diameter wider than two Earths.NASA's Cassini spacecraft took these images of the planet's mysterious hexagon-shaped jetstream in December 2016. The hexagon was discovered in images taken by the Voyager spacecraft in the early 1980s. It's estimated to have a diameter wider than two Earths. Photos: Wonders of the universeNASA’s Cassini spacecraft took these images of the planet’s mysterious hexagon-shaped jetstream in December 2016. The hexagon was discovered in images taken by the Voyager spacecraft in the early 1980s. It’s estimated to have a diameter wider than two Earths.Hide Caption 159 of 200A dead star gives off a greenish glow in this Hubble Space Telescope image of the Crab Nebula, located about 6,500 light years from Earth in the constellation Taurus. NASA released the image for Halloween 2016 and played up the theme in its press release. The agency said the "ghoulish-looking object still has a pulse." At the center of the Crab Nebula is the crushed core, or "heart" of an exploded star. The heart is spinning 30 times per second and producing a magnetic field that generates 1 trillion volts, NASA said.A dead star gives off a greenish glow in this Hubble Space Telescope image of the Crab Nebula, located about 6,500 light years from Earth in the constellation Taurus. NASA released the image for Halloween 2016 and played up the theme in its press release. The agency said the "ghoulish-looking object still has a pulse." At the center of the Crab Nebula is the crushed core, or "heart" of an exploded star. The heart is spinning 30 times per second and producing a magnetic field that generates 1 trillion volts, NASA said. Photos: Wonders of the universeA dead star gives off a greenish glow in this Hubble Space Telescope image of the Crab Nebula, located about 6,500 light years from Earth in the constellation Taurus. NASA released the image for Halloween 2016 and played up the theme in its press release. The agency said the “ghoulish-looking object still has a pulse.” At the center of the Crab Nebula is the crushed core, or “heart” of an exploded star. The heart is spinning 30 times per second and producing a magnetic field that generates 1 trillion volts, NASA said.Hide Caption 160 of 200Peering through the thick dust clouds of the galactic bulge, an international team of astronomers revealed the unusual mix of stars in the stellar cluster known as Terzan 5. The new results indicate that Terzan 5 is one of the bulge's primordial building blocks, most likely the relic of the very early days of the Milky Way. Peering through the thick dust clouds of the galactic bulge, an international team of astronomers revealed the unusual mix of stars in the stellar cluster known as Terzan 5. The new results indicate that Terzan 5 is one of the bulge's primordial building blocks, most likely the relic of the very early days of the Milky Way. Photos: Wonders of the universePeering through the thick dust clouds of the galactic bulge, an international team of astronomers revealed the unusual mix of stars in the stellar cluster known as Terzan 5. The new results indicate that Terzan 5 is one of the bulge’s primordial building blocks, most likely the relic of the very early days of the Milky Way. Hide Caption 161 of 200An artist's conception of Planet Nine, which would be the farthest planet within our solar system. The similar cluster orbits of extreme objects on the edge of our solar system suggest a massive planet is located there.An artist's conception of Planet Nine, which would be the farthest planet within our solar system. The similar cluster orbits of extreme objects on the edge of our solar system suggest a massive planet is located there. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s conception of Planet Nine, which would be the farthest planet within our solar system. The similar cluster orbits of extreme objects on the edge of our solar system suggest a massive planet is located there.Hide Caption 162 of 200An illustration of the orbits of the new and previously known extremely distant Solar System objects. The clustering of most of their orbits indicates that they are likely be influenced by something massive and very distant, the proposed Planet X.An illustration of the orbits of the new and previously known extremely distant Solar System objects. The clustering of most of their orbits indicates that they are likely be influenced by something massive and very distant, the proposed Planet X. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn illustration of the orbits of the new and previously known extremely distant Solar System objects. The clustering of most of their orbits indicates that they are likely be influenced by something massive and very distant, the proposed Planet X.Hide Caption 163 of 200Say hello to dark galaxy Dragonfly 44. Like our Milky Way, it has a halo of spherical clusters of stars around its core. Say hello to dark galaxy Dragonfly 44. Like our Milky Way, it has a halo of spherical clusters of stars around its core. Photos: Wonders of the universeSay hello to dark galaxy Dragonfly 44. Like our Milky Way, it has a halo of spherical clusters of stars around its core. Hide Caption 164 of 200A classical nova occurs when a white dwarf star gains matter from its secondary star (a red dwarf) over a period of time, causing a thermonuclear reaction on the surface that eventually erupts in a single visible outburst. This creates a 10,000-fold increase in brightness, depicted here in an artist's rendering.A classical nova occurs when a white dwarf star gains matter from its secondary star (a red dwarf) over a period of time, causing a thermonuclear reaction on the surface that eventually erupts in a single visible outburst. This creates a 10,000-fold increase in brightness, depicted here in an artist's rendering. Photos: Wonders of the universeA classical nova occurs when a white dwarf star gains matter from its secondary star (a red dwarf) over a period of time, causing a thermonuclear reaction on the surface that eventually erupts in a single visible outburst. This creates a 10,000-fold increase in brightness, depicted here in an artist’s rendering.Hide Caption 165 of 200Gravitational lensing and space warping are visible in this image of near and distant galaxies captured by Hubble. Gravitational lensing and space warping are visible in this image of near and distant galaxies captured by Hubble. Photos: Wonders of the universeGravitational lensing and space warping are visible in this image of near and distant galaxies captured by Hubble. Hide Caption 166 of 200At the center of our galaxy, the Milky Way, researchers discovered an X-shaped structure within a tightly packed group of stars. At the center of our galaxy, the Milky Way, researchers discovered an X-shaped structure within a tightly packed group of stars. Photos: Wonders of the universeAt the center of our galaxy, the Milky Way, researchers discovered an X-shaped structure within a tightly packed group of stars. Hide Caption 167 of 200Meet UGC 1382: What astronomers thought was a normal elliptical galaxy (left) was actually revealed to be a massive disc galaxy made up of different parts when viewed with ultraviolet and deep optical data (center and right). In a complete reversal of normal galaxy structure, the center is younger than its outer spiral disk. Meet UGC 1382: What astronomers thought was a normal elliptical galaxy (left) was actually revealed to be a massive disc galaxy made up of different parts when viewed with ultraviolet and deep optical data (center and right). In a complete reversal of normal galaxy structure, the center is younger than its outer spiral disk. Photos: Wonders of the universeMeet UGC 1382: What astronomers thought was a normal elliptical galaxy (left) was actually revealed to be a massive disc galaxy made up of different parts when viewed with ultraviolet and deep optical data (center and right). In a complete reversal of normal galaxy structure, the center is younger than its outer spiral disk. Hide Caption 168 of 200NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of the Crab Nebula and its "beating heart," which is a neutron star at the right of the two bright stars in the center of this image. The neutron star pulses 30 times a second. The rainbow colors are visible due to the movement of materials in the nebula occurring during the time-lapse of the image. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of the Crab Nebula and its "beating heart," which is a neutron star at the right of the two bright stars in the center of this image. The neutron star pulses 30 times a second. The rainbow colors are visible due to the movement of materials in the nebula occurring during the time-lapse of the image. Photos: Wonders of the universeNASA’s Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of the Crab Nebula and its “beating heart,” which is a neutron star at the right of the two bright stars in the center of this image. The neutron star pulses 30 times a second. The rainbow colors are visible due to the movement of materials in the nebula occurring during the time-lapse of the image. Hide Caption 169 of 200The Hubble Space Telescope captured an image of a hidden galaxy that is fainter than Andromeda or the Milky Way. This low surface brightness galaxy, called UGC 477, is over 110 million light-years away in the constellation of Pisces.The Hubble Space Telescope captured an image of a hidden galaxy that is fainter than Andromeda or the Milky Way. This low surface brightness galaxy, called UGC 477, is over 110 million light-years away in the constellation of Pisces. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Hubble Space Telescope captured an image of a hidden galaxy that is fainter than Andromeda or the Milky Way. This low surface brightness galaxy, called UGC 477, is over 110 million light-years away in the constellation of Pisces.Hide Caption 170 of 200On April 19, NASA released new images of bright craters on Ceres. This photo shows the Haulani Crater, which has evidence of landslides from its rim. Scientists believe some craters on the dwarf planet are bright because they are relatively new. On April 19, NASA released new images of bright craters on Ceres. This photo shows the Haulani Crater, which has evidence of landslides from its rim. Scientists believe some craters on the dwarf planet are bright because they are relatively new. Photos: Wonders of the universeOn April 19, NASA released new images of bright craters on Ceres. This photo shows the Haulani Crater, which has evidence of landslides from its rim. Scientists believe some craters on the dwarf planet are bright because they are relatively new. Hide Caption 171 of 200This illustration shows the millions of dust grains NASA's Cassini spacecraft has sampled near Saturn. A few dozen of them appear to have come from beyond our solar system.This illustration shows the millions of dust grains NASA's Cassini spacecraft has sampled near Saturn. A few dozen of them appear to have come from beyond our solar system. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis illustration shows the millions of dust grains NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has sampled near Saturn. A few dozen of them appear to have come from beyond our solar system.Hide Caption 172 of 200This image from the VLT Survey Telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile shows a stunning concentration of galaxies known as the Fornax Cluster, which can be found in the Southern Hemisphere. At the center of this cluster, in the middle of the three bright blobs on the left side of the image, lies a cD galaxy -- a galactic cannibal that has grown in size by consuming smaller galaxies.This image from the VLT Survey Telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile shows a stunning concentration of galaxies known as the Fornax Cluster, which can be found in the Southern Hemisphere. At the center of this cluster, in the middle of the three bright blobs on the left side of the image, lies a cD galaxy -- a galactic cannibal that has grown in size by consuming smaller galaxies. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis image from the VLT Survey Telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile shows a stunning concentration of galaxies known as the Fornax Cluster, which can be found in the Southern Hemisphere. At the center of this cluster, in the middle of the three bright blobs on the left side of the image, lies a cD galaxy — a galactic cannibal that has grown in size by consuming smaller galaxies.Hide Caption 173 of 200This image shows the central region of the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The young and dense star cluster R136, which contains hundreds of massive stars, is visible in the lower right of the image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.This image shows the central region of the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The young and dense star cluster R136, which contains hundreds of massive stars, is visible in the lower right of the image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis image shows the central region of the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The young and dense star cluster R136, which contains hundreds of massive stars, is visible in the lower right of the image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.Hide Caption 174 of 200In March 2016, astronomers published a paper on powerful red flashes coming from binary system V404 Cygni in 2015.  This illustration shows a black hole, similar to the one in V404 Cygni, devouring material from an orbiting star. In March 2016, astronomers published a paper on powerful red flashes coming from binary system V404 Cygni in 2015.  This illustration shows a black hole, similar to the one in V404 Cygni, devouring material from an orbiting star. Photos: Wonders of the universeIn March 2016, astronomers published a paper on powerful red flashes coming from binary system V404 Cygni in 2015. This illustration shows a black hole, similar to the one in V404 Cygni, devouring material from an orbiting star. Hide Caption 175 of 200A <a href="http://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1606/" target="_blank">new map of the Milky Way</a> was released February 24, 2016, giving astronomers a full census of the star-forming regions within our own galaxy. The APEX telescope in Chile captured this survey.A <a href="http://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1606/" target="_blank">new map of the Milky Way</a> was released February 24, 2016, giving astronomers a full census of the star-forming regions within our own galaxy. The APEX telescope in Chile captured this survey. Photos: Wonders of the universeA new map of the Milky Way was released February 24, 2016, giving astronomers a full census of the star-forming regions within our own galaxy. The APEX telescope in Chile captured this survey.Hide Caption 176 of 200This image shows the elliptical galaxy NGC 4889, deeply embedded within the Coma galaxy cluster. There is a gigantic supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy.This image shows the elliptical galaxy NGC 4889, deeply embedded within the Coma galaxy cluster. There is a gigantic supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis image shows the elliptical galaxy NGC 4889, deeply embedded within the Coma galaxy cluster. There is a gigantic supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy.Hide Caption 177 of 200An artist's impression of 2MASS J2126, which takens 900,000 years to orbit its star, 1 trillion kilometers away. An artist's impression of 2MASS J2126, which takens 900,000 years to orbit its star, 1 trillion kilometers away. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s impression of 2MASS J2126, which takens 900,000 years to orbit its star, 1 trillion kilometers away. Hide Caption 178 of 200Caltech researchers have found evidence of a giant planet tracing a bizarre, highly elongated orbit in the outer solar system. The object, nicknamed Planet Nine, has a mass about 10 times that of Earth and orbits about 20 times farther from the sun on average than does Neptune. Caltech researchers have found evidence of a giant planet tracing a bizarre, highly elongated orbit in the outer solar system. The object, nicknamed Planet Nine, has a mass about 10 times that of Earth and orbits about 20 times farther from the sun on average than does Neptune. Photos: Wonders of the universeCaltech researchers have found evidence of a giant planet tracing a bizarre, highly elongated orbit in the outer solar system. The object, nicknamed Planet Nine, has a mass about 10 times that of Earth and orbits about 20 times farther from the sun on average than does Neptune. Hide Caption 179 of 200<a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/14/us/possible-powerful-supernova/index.html" target="_blank">An international team of astronomers</a> may have discovered the biggest and brightest supernova ever. The explosion was 570 billion times brighter than the sun and 20 times brighter than all the stars in the Milky Way galaxy combined, according to a statement from The Ohio State University, which is leading the study. Scientists are straining to define the supernova's strength. This image shows an artist's impression of the supernova as it would appear from an exoplanet located about 10,000 light years away.<a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/14/us/possible-powerful-supernova/index.html" target="_blank">An international team of astronomers</a> may have discovered the biggest and brightest supernova ever. The explosion was 570 billion times brighter than the sun and 20 times brighter than all the stars in the Milky Way galaxy combined, according to a statement from The Ohio State University, which is leading the study. Scientists are straining to define the supernova's strength. This image shows an artist's impression of the supernova as it would appear from an exoplanet located about 10,000 light years away. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn international team of astronomers may have discovered the biggest and brightest supernova ever. The explosion was 570 billion times brighter than the sun and 20 times brighter than all the stars in the Milky Way galaxy combined, according to a statement from The Ohio State University, which is leading the study. Scientists are straining to define the supernova’s strength. This image shows an artist’s impression of the supernova as it would appear from an exoplanet located about 10,000 light years away.Hide Caption 180 of 200Astronomers noticed huge waves of <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/06/world/black-hole-burps/index.html">gas being "burped" </a>by the black hole at the center of NGC 5195, a small galaxy 26 million light years from Earth. The team believes the outburst is a consequence of the interaction of NGC 5195 with a nearby galaxy. Astronomers noticed huge waves of <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/06/world/black-hole-burps/index.html">gas being "burped" </a>by the black hole at the center of NGC 5195, a small galaxy 26 million light years from Earth. The team believes the outburst is a consequence of the interaction of NGC 5195 with a nearby galaxy. Photos: Wonders of the universeAstronomers noticed huge waves of gas being “burped” by the black hole at the center of NGC 5195, a small galaxy 26 million light years from Earth. The team believes the outburst is a consequence of the interaction of NGC 5195 with a nearby galaxy. Hide Caption 181 of 200An artist's illustration shows a binary black hole found in the quasar at the center of the Markarian 231 galaxy. Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope  <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/31/us/double-black-hole-nasa-hubble-feat/" target="_blank">discovered the galaxy being powered by two black holes</a> "furiously whirling about each other," the space agency said in a news release.An artist's illustration shows a binary black hole found in the quasar at the center of the Markarian 231 galaxy. Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope  <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/31/us/double-black-hole-nasa-hubble-feat/" target="_blank">discovered the galaxy being powered by two black holes</a> "furiously whirling about each other," the space agency said in a news release. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s illustration shows a binary black hole found in the quasar at the center of the Markarian 231 galaxy. Astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope discovered the galaxy being powered by two black holes “furiously whirling about each other,” the space agency said in a news release.Hide Caption 182 of 200An artist's impression of what a black hole might look like. In February, researchers in China said they had spotted a super-massive black hole 12 billion times the size of the sun.An artist's impression of what a black hole might look like. In February, researchers in China said they had spotted a super-massive black hole 12 billion times the size of the sun. Photos: Wonders of the universeAn artist’s impression of what a black hole might look like. In February, researchers in China said they had spotted a super-massive black hole 12 billion times the size of the sun.Hide Caption 183 of 200Are there are oceans on any of Jupiter's moons? The Juice probe shown in this artist's impression aims to find out. Picture courtesy of ESA/AOESAre there are oceans on any of Jupiter's moons? The Juice probe shown in this artist's impression aims to find out. Picture courtesy of ESA/AOES Photos: Wonders of the universeAre there are oceans on any of Jupiter’s moons? The Juice probe shown in this artist’s impression aims to find out. Picture courtesy of ESA/AOESHide Caption 184 of 200Astronomers have discovered powerful auroras on a brown dwarf that is 20 light-years away. This is an artist's concept of the phenomenon. Astronomers have discovered powerful auroras on a brown dwarf that is 20 light-years away. This is an artist's concept of the phenomenon. Photos: Wonders of the universeAstronomers have discovered powerful auroras on a brown dwarf that is 20 light-years away. This is an artist’s concept of the phenomenon. Hide Caption 185 of 200Venus, bottom, and Jupiter shine brightly above Matthews, North Carolina, on Monday, June 29. The apparent close encounter, called a conjunction, has been giving a dazzling display in the summer sky. Although the two planets appear to be close together, in reality they are millions of miles apart.Venus, bottom, and Jupiter shine brightly above Matthews, North Carolina, on Monday, June 29. The apparent close encounter, called a conjunction, has been giving a dazzling display in the summer sky. Although the two planets appear to be close together, in reality they are millions of miles apart. Photos: Wonders of the universeVenus, bottom, and Jupiter shine brightly above Matthews, North Carolina, on Monday, June 29. The apparent close encounter, called a conjunction, has been giving a dazzling display in the summer sky. Although the two planets appear to be close together, in reality they are millions of miles apart.Hide Caption 186 of 200Jupiter's icy moon Europa may be the best place in the solar system to look for extraterrestrial life, according to NASA. The moon is about the size of Earth's moon, and there is evidence it has an ocean beneath its frozen crust that may hold twice as much water as Earth. NASA's 2016 budget includes a request for $30 million to plan a mission to investigate Europa. The image above was taken by the Galileo spacecraft on November 25, 1999. It's a 12-frame mosaic and is considered the the best image yet of the side of Europa that faces Jupiter.Jupiter's icy moon Europa may be the best place in the solar system to look for extraterrestrial life, according to NASA. The moon is about the size of Earth's moon, and there is evidence it has an ocean beneath its frozen crust that may hold twice as much water as Earth. NASA's 2016 budget includes a request for $30 million to plan a mission to investigate Europa. The image above was taken by the Galileo spacecraft on November 25, 1999. It's a 12-frame mosaic and is considered the the best image yet of the side of Europa that faces Jupiter. Photos: Wonders of the universeJupiter’s icy moon Europa may be the best place in the solar system to look for extraterrestrial life, according to NASA. The moon is about the size of Earth’s moon, and there is evidence it has an ocean beneath its frozen crust that may hold twice as much water as Earth. NASA’s 2016 budget includes a request for $30 million to plan a mission to investigate Europa. The image above was taken by the Galileo spacecraft on November 25, 1999. It’s a 12-frame mosaic and is considered the the best image yet of the side of Europa that faces Jupiter.Hide Caption 187 of 200This nebula, or cloud of gas and dust, is called RCW 34 or Gum 19. The brightest areas you can see are where the gas is being heated by young stars. Eventually the gas burst outward like champagne after a bottle is uncorked. Scientists call this champagne flow. This new image of the nebula was captured by the European Space Organization's Very Large Telescope in Chile. RCW 34 is in the constellation Vela in the southern sky. The name means "sails of a ship" in Latin.This nebula, or cloud of gas and dust, is called RCW 34 or Gum 19. The brightest areas you can see are where the gas is being heated by young stars. Eventually the gas burst outward like champagne after a bottle is uncorked. Scientists call this champagne flow. This new image of the nebula was captured by the European Space Organization's Very Large Telescope in Chile. RCW 34 is in the constellation Vela in the southern sky. The name means "sails of a ship" in Latin. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis nebula, or cloud of gas and dust, is called RCW 34 or Gum 19. The brightest areas you can see are where the gas is being heated by young stars. Eventually the gas burst outward like champagne after a bottle is uncorked. Scientists call this champagne flow. This new image of the nebula was captured by the European Space Organization’s Very Large Telescope in Chile. RCW 34 is in the constellation Vela in the southern sky. The name means “sails of a ship” in Latin.Hide Caption 188 of 200The Hubble Space Telescope captured images of Jupiter's three great moons -- Io, Callisto, and Europa -- passing by at once.The Hubble Space Telescope captured images of Jupiter's three great moons -- Io, Callisto, and Europa -- passing by at once. Photos: Wonders of the universeThe Hubble Space Telescope captured images of Jupiter’s three great moons — Io, Callisto, and Europa — passing by at once.Hide Caption 189 of 200A massive galaxy cluster known as SDSS J1038+4849 <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2015/02/10/tech/space-smiley-face/index.html">looks like a smiley face</a> in an image captured by the Hubble Telescope. The two glowing eyes are actually two distant galaxies. And what of the smile and the round face? That's a result of what astronomers call "strong gravitational lensing." That happens because the gravitational pull between the two galaxy clusters is so strong it distorts time and space around them.A massive galaxy cluster known as SDSS J1038+4849 <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2015/02/10/tech/space-smiley-face/index.html">looks like a smiley face</a> in an image captured by the Hubble Telescope. The two glowing eyes are actually two distant galaxies. And what of the smile and the round face? That's a result of what astronomers call "strong gravitational lensing." That happens because the gravitational pull between the two galaxy clusters is so strong it distorts time and space around them. Photos: Wonders of the universeA massive galaxy cluster known as SDSS J1038+4849 looks like a smiley face in an image captured by the Hubble Telescope. The two glowing eyes are actually two distant galaxies. And what of the smile and the round face? That’s a result of what astronomers call “strong gravitational lensing.” That happens because the gravitational pull between the two galaxy clusters is so strong it distorts time and space around them.Hide Caption 190 of 200Using powerful optics, astronomers have found a planet-like body, J1407b, with rings 200 times the size of Saturn's. This is an artist's depiction of the rings of planet J1407b, which are eclipsing a star.Using powerful optics, astronomers have found a planet-like body, J1407b, with rings 200 times the size of Saturn's. This is an artist's depiction of the rings of planet J1407b, which are eclipsing a star. Photos: Wonders of the universeUsing powerful optics, astronomers have found a planet-like body, J1407b, with rings 200 times the size of Saturn’s. This is an artist’s depiction of the rings of planet J1407b, which are eclipsing a star.Hide Caption 191 of 200A patch of stars appears to be missing in this image from the La Silla Observatory in Chile. But the stars are actually still there behind a cloud of gas and dust called Lynds Dark Nebula 483. The cloud is about 700 light years from Earth in the constellation Serpens (The Serpent).A patch of stars appears to be missing in this image from the La Silla Observatory in Chile. But the stars are actually still there behind a cloud of gas and dust called Lynds Dark Nebula 483. The cloud is about 700 light years from Earth in the constellation Serpens (The Serpent). Photos: Wonders of the universeA patch of stars appears to be missing in this image from the La Silla Observatory in Chile. But the stars are actually still there behind a cloud of gas and dust called Lynds Dark Nebula 483. The cloud is about 700 light years from Earth in the constellation Serpens (The Serpent).Hide Caption 192 of 200This is the largest Hubble Space Telescope image ever assembled. It's a portion of the galaxy next door, Andromeda (M31).This is the largest Hubble Space Telescope image ever assembled. It's a portion of the galaxy next door, Andromeda (M31). Photos: Wonders of the universeThis is the largest Hubble Space Telescope image ever assembled. It’s a portion of the galaxy next door, Andromeda (M31).Hide Caption 193 of 200NASA has captured a stunning new image of the so-called "Pillars of Creation," one of the space agency's most iconic discoveries. The giant columns of cold gas, in a small region of the Eagle Nebula, were popularized by a similar image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995. NASA has captured a stunning new image of the so-called "Pillars of Creation," one of the space agency's most iconic discoveries. The giant columns of cold gas, in a small region of the Eagle Nebula, were popularized by a similar image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995. Photos: Wonders of the universeNASA has captured a stunning new image of the so-called “Pillars of Creation,” one of the space agency’s most iconic discoveries. The giant columns of cold gas, in a small region of the Eagle Nebula, were popularized by a similar image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995. Hide Caption 194 of 200Astronomers using the Hubble Space pieced together this picture that shows a small section of space in the southern-hemisphere constellation Fornax. Within this deep-space image are 10,000 galaxies, going back in time as far as a few hundred million years after the Big Bang.Astronomers using the Hubble Space pieced together this picture that shows a small section of space in the southern-hemisphere constellation Fornax. Within this deep-space image are 10,000 galaxies, going back in time as far as a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. Photos: Wonders of the universeAstronomers using the Hubble Space pieced together this picture that shows a small section of space in the southern-hemisphere constellation Fornax. Within this deep-space image are 10,000 galaxies, going back in time as far as a few hundred million years after the Big Bang.Hide Caption 195 of 200Planetary nebula Abell 33 appears ring-like in this image, taken using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. The blue bubble was created when an aging star shed its outer layers and a star in the foreground happened to align with it to create a "diamond engagement ring" effect.Planetary nebula Abell 33 appears ring-like in this image, taken using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope. The blue bubble was created when an aging star shed its outer layers and a star in the foreground happened to align with it to create a "diamond engagement ring" effect. Photos: Wonders of the universePlanetary nebula Abell 33 appears ring-like in this image, taken using the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope. The blue bubble was created when an aging star shed its outer layers and a star in the foreground happened to align with it to create a “diamond engagement ring” effect.Hide Caption 196 of 200This long-exposure image from the Hubble Telescope is the <a href="http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2014/01/full/" target="_blank">deepest-ever picture taken of a cluster of galaxies. The cluster, </a>called Abell 2744, contains several hundred galaxies as they looked 3.5 billion years ago; the more distant galaxies appear as they did more than 12 billion years ago, not long after the Big Bang. This long-exposure image from the Hubble Telescope is the <a href="http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2014/01/full/" target="_blank">deepest-ever picture taken of a cluster of galaxies. The cluster, </a>called Abell 2744, contains several hundred galaxies as they looked 3.5 billion years ago; the more distant galaxies appear as they did more than 12 billion years ago, not long after the Big Bang. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis long-exposure image from the Hubble Telescope is the deepest-ever picture taken of a cluster of galaxies. The cluster, called Abell 2744, contains several hundred galaxies as they looked 3.5 billion years ago; the more distant galaxies appear as they did more than 12 billion years ago, not long after the Big Bang. Hide Caption 197 of 200This Hubble image looks a floating marble or a maybe a giant, disembodied eye. But it's actually a nebula with a giant star at its center. Scientists think the star used to be 20 times more massive than our sun, but it's dying and is destined to go supernova.This Hubble image looks a floating marble or a maybe a giant, disembodied eye. But it's actually a nebula with a giant star at its center. Scientists think the star used to be 20 times more massive than our sun, but it's dying and is destined to go supernova. Photos: Wonders of the universeThis Hubble image looks a floating marble or a maybe a giant, disembodied eye. But it’s actually a nebula with a giant star at its center. Scientists think the star used to be 20 times more massive than our sun, but it’s dying and is destined to go supernova.Hide Caption 198 of 200Composite image of B14-65666 showing the distributions of dust (red), oxygen (green), and carbon (blue), observed by ALMA and stars (white) observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.Composite image of B14-65666 showing the distributions of dust (red), oxygen (green), and carbon (blue), observed by ALMA and stars (white) observed by the Hubble Space Telescope. Photos: Wonders of the universeComposite image of B14-65666 showing the distributions of dust (red), oxygen (green), and carbon (blue), observed by ALMA and stars (white) observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.Hide Caption 199 of 200Artist's impression of the merging galaxies B14-65666 located 13 billion light years-away.Artist's impression of the merging galaxies B14-65666 located 13 billion light years-away. Photos: Wonders of the universeArtist’s impression of the merging galaxies B14-65666 located 13 billion light years-away.Hide Caption 200 of 20001b zodiacal light wonders of the universe gallerygalaxy tidal tail illustrationgaia 2020 star surveywonders of the universe 1118Betelgeuse jan 2019wonders of the universe Wolf-Rayet binary01 wonders of the universe SPHERE01 wonders of the universe 0901wonders of the universe Betelgeuse01 wonders of the universe_SPT0418-47supernova 2019ehksupernova 0722venus aine corona wonders of the universe supernova exploding RESTRICTED 01 wonders of the universe galleryRESTRICTED 01 wonders of the universeblue variable star Kinman Dwarf galaxyRESTRICTED wonders of the universe gallerywonders of the universe Visualization GW190814wonders of the universe repeating fast radio burst01 fast radio bursts matter detection03 wonders of the universe galleryring galaxy illustration02 wonders of the universe 052201 ab aurigae star birthnearby black holewonders of the universe black hole white dwarf02 false exoplanet detection01 interstellar comet 2IborisovSchwarzschild precessionbrightest supernova scnwonders of the universe brown dwarf01 black holewonders of the universe star red dwarfwonders of the universe white dwarfswonders of the universe ophiuchus xrayalma stellar fightspitzer tarantula nebulavampire starmilky way g objects02 wonders of the universe 0113wonders of the universe ancient north star03 wonders of the universeFast Radio Burst wonders of the universe milky way center02 wonders of the universe03 wonders of the universe white dwarf 1204wonders of the universe abell 85 clusterwonders of the universe 112604 wonders of the world 1126merging of galaxiesgamma ray burstswonders of the universe_cosmic peacocksmilky way black hole star02 Jack-o-Lantern Nebulawonders of the universe hubble ghost facewonders of the universe Hygieawonders of the universe 1022young star illustrationwonders of the universe Borisov cometwonders of the universe young planet 1010wonders of the universe galaxy clustersaturn hubble portraitmilky way explosionwonders of the universe circumstellar disks01 wonders of the universe 100318Wonders of the universewonders of the universe 092701 wonders of the universe 092602 wonders of the universe 092606 wonders of the universe 0925interstellar comet 0913tabbys starwonders of the universe neutron starwonders of the universe_large magellanic cloudwonders of the universe 190912wonders of the universe 072501 wonders of the universe_milky way radio imagehubble discovers kilonavawonders of the universe_black hole neutron starwonders of the universe 0819massive star supernova 0815wonders of the universe_Galaxy NGC 586601 wonders of the universer hubble jupiter01 faint galaxies03 faint galaxiesancient stars universe 0801wonders of the universe 0724wonders of the universe milky way01 wonders of the universe 0711wonders of the universe stars in bloomwonders of the universe 0702wonders of the universe_Cosmic Fireworks in Ultravioletinterstellar asteroid PHOTO ILLUSTRATION01 supernovae renderingCSIRO Australian SKA Pathfinder 01 spitzer telescope whirlpoolwonders of the universe 0625wonders of the universe magnified galaxieswonders of the universeNICER wonders of the universewonders of the universe Cepheus C BNGC 4485 NASA0502 wonders of the universewonders of the universe 0425wonders of the universe 0419wonders of the universe 0417wonders of the universe 0329CTB 1 supernova wonders of the universe02 wonders of the universe 031503 wonders of the universe heic1905a01 wonders of the universe01 wonders of the universeneptune moonwhite dwarf asteroid warped milky way illustrationwonders of the universe 4wonders of the universe 3wonders of the universe 101 wonders of the universe_supermassive Large Magellanic Cloud03 wonders of the universe COWwonders of the universe High Green Bankcomet 46p wirtanenwater asteroid bennuwonders of the universe_young starsApep 8 microns wonders of the universe01 wonders of the universe04 wonders of the universe03 wonders of the universe05 wonders of the universe03 wonders of the universe 110102 wonders of the universe 110101 wonders of the universe 1101wonders of the universe supernova iPTF 14gqr01 Planet X01 wonders of the universe 080702 wonders of the universe01 wonders of the universe03 wonders of the world 0712Wonders of the universe GALLERY01 first interstellar immigrant wonders of the universe diamond matrix meteoriteasteroid 2004 EW95 wonders of the universe01 Hubble 28th anniversary02 Hubble 28th anniversaryRosette Nebulamartian crater streaks01 zombie star supernova diamond rain planets01 orion nebulaParker Solar Probe spacecraft sun illustration Earth Between Rings of Saturnhubble milky way mar 2016NASA Saturn moon deathstarearth from mars reconnaissance orbiterPGC 1000714 New GalaxyCassini Saturn hexagon collageHubble star ghostly glow01 fossilised star cluster01 extreme objects solar system planet nine02 extreme objects solar system planet ninewonders of the universe dark twinwonders of the universe nova 30721 wonders of the universe 01 wonders of the universe Frankenstein Galaxynasa hubble crab nebulagalaxy UGC 477ceres bright craterscassini saturn dust illustrationFornax Clustergiant starsblack hole 0316Milky Way new photo galaxy orig vstan dlewis_00000000hubble NGC 4889loneliest planet biggest galaxyPlanet 9 superluminous supernova ASASSN-15lh Black hole 3double black hole 0831black holeJuice probe Jupiter01 Brown dwarf aurorasJupiter Venuseuropa 0529RCW 3401 Jupiter moons eclipse 0206Hubble galaxy smiley facegiant planetary ring systemMissing starsAndromeda galaxy02 Pillars of CreationHubble color galaxiesnebula abell 33 EMBARGOED TILL 0409Faraway GalaxiesStar Set to Explode02 wonders of the universe 061701 wonders of the universe 0617Yankee Stadium is expected to join Mets’ Citi Field as a vaccine mega site”Take me out to the Covid-19 vaccine site, take me out to the safe and socially distanced crowd!” This Keurig-like machine for soft serve ice cream is what the world really needsOhhh, the trouble this machine could cause in a household.A dish-washing robot & a flying Cadillac: See the highlights from CESA dish-washing robot & a flying Cadillac: See the highlights from CESA dish-washing robot & a flying Cadillac: See the highlights from CESJUST WATCHEDA dish-washing robot & a flying Cadillac: See the highlights from CESReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

A dish-washing robot & a flying Cadillac: See the highlights from CES 01:56There’s a case of wine heading back to Earth from spaceSpace wine? That’s a new status symbol, unlocked. We’re learning more about the ancient dire wolf, inspiration for ‘Game of Thrones’ creatureWait, direwolves were REAL?TODAY’S NUMBER$2 trillionThat’s roughly the expected price tag of the major Covid-19 relief package Biden is expected to reveal today. And yes, it’s expected to include $2,000 stimulus checks. Biden urges mask wearing after receiving second vaccine doseBiden urges mask wearing after receiving second vaccine doseBiden urges mask wearing after receiving second vaccine doseJUST WATCHEDBiden urges mask wearing after receiving second vaccine doseReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Biden urges mask wearing after receiving second vaccine dose 02:17TODAY’S QUOTE”Our relationship with technology has fundamentally changed. The pandemic has elevated technology to become an essential part of how we live, work, play and communicate.”Lisa Su, CEO of chipmaker AMD, in a keynote speech at CES. Computing technology took center stage at this year’s pared-down electronics show. From HD TVs to CDs, this retro tech was the hit of CES in 1989From HD TVs to CDs, this retro tech was the hit of CES in 1989From HD TVs to CDs, this retro tech was the hit of CES in 1989JUST WATCHEDFrom HD TVs to CDs, this retro tech was the hit of CES in 1989ReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

From HD TVs to CDs, this retro tech was the hit of CES in 1989 02:37TODAY’S WEATHERCentral US storm brings more wind and snowCentral US storm brings more wind and snowCentral US storm brings more wind and snowJUST WATCHEDCentral US storm brings more wind and snowReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Central US storm brings more wind and snow 01:55Check your local forecast here>>>AND FINALLYA closer look at the Fife tiara Sometimes you just need to look at something shiny. Will a royal tiara with 200 carats of delicate and dangling diamonds do? (Click here to view.)

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