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(CNN)Pandemic unemployment benefits expire this coming weekend in the 26 states still offering them. But that probably won’t make a huge difference in the job market.

Here’s what you need to know to Get Up to Speed and On with Your Day. (You can also get “5 Things You Need to Know Today” delivered to your inbox daily. Sign up here.)1. Hurricane IdaHurricane Ida slammed into Louisiana yesterday as a Category 4 storm, leaving at least one person dead and more than 1 million facing power outages and widespread destruction. Some people had to scramble to their roofs as storm surge and flash flooding overtook levees in areas south of New Orleans. The storm was so strong it actually temporarily stopped the flow of the Mississippi River near the city and caused it to reverse flow — something the US Geological Survey says is “extremely uncommon.” The hurricane arrived on the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, serving as a grim reminder of the scars of past storms. Ida has now weakened to a tropical storm but is still churning up deadly storm surge as it lingers inland. The National Weather Service in New Orleans says areas affected by surge could be uninhabitable for weeks or months. Tornados — a common companion of hurricanes — will also be a threat today. A group of people cross an intersection as Hurricane Ida approaches on Sunday, August 29, in New Orleans.A group of people cross an intersection as Hurricane Ida approaches on Sunday, August 29, in New Orleans. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastA group of people cross an intersection as Hurricane Ida approaches on Sunday, August 29, in New Orleans.Hide Caption 1 of 39Montegut Fire Chief Toby Henry walks back to his fire truck in the rain as firefighters cut through trees on the road in Bourg, Louisiana, as Hurricane Ida passes on August 29.Montegut Fire Chief Toby Henry walks back to his fire truck in the rain as firefighters cut through trees on the road in Bourg, Louisiana, as Hurricane Ida passes on August 29. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastMontegut Fire Chief Toby Henry walks back to his fire truck in the rain as firefighters cut through trees on the road in Bourg, Louisiana, as Hurricane Ida passes on August 29.Hide Caption 2 of 39Firefighters cut through downed trees on a road in Bourg, Louisiana, on August 29.Firefighters cut through downed trees on a road in Bourg, Louisiana, on August 29. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastFirefighters cut through downed trees on a road in Bourg, Louisiana, on August 29.Hide Caption 3 of 39Barges are seen docked on the Mississippi River as Hurricane Ida hits Destrehan, Louisiana, on August 29.Barges are seen docked on the Mississippi River as Hurricane Ida hits Destrehan, Louisiana, on August 29. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastBarges are seen docked on the Mississippi River as Hurricane Ida hits Destrehan, Louisiana, on August 29.Hide Caption 4 of 39Kandaysha Harris wipes her face before continuing traveling through the storm on August 29 in New Orleans. Kandaysha Harris wipes her face before continuing traveling through the storm on August 29 in New Orleans. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastKandaysha Harris wipes her face before continuing traveling through the storm on August 29 in New Orleans. Hide Caption 5 of 39European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet took this photo of Hurricane Ida on Sunday from the International Space Station.European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet took this photo of Hurricane Ida on Sunday from the International Space Station. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastEuropean Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet took this photo of Hurricane Ida on Sunday from the International Space Station.Hide Caption 6 of 39People work inside the Federal Emergency Management Agency's headquarters in Washington, DC, on Sunday.People work inside the Federal Emergency Management Agency's headquarters in Washington, DC, on Sunday. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastPeople work inside the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s headquarters in Washington, DC, on Sunday.Hide Caption 7 of 39A cyclist wears a face mask while biking through the rain and high winds on Canal Street in New Orleans on August 29.A cyclist wears a face mask while biking through the rain and high winds on Canal Street in New Orleans on August 29. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastA cyclist wears a face mask while biking through the rain and high winds on Canal Street in New Orleans on August 29.Hide Caption 8 of 39A man passes by a section of roof that was blown off a building in the French Quarter of New Orleans on Sunday.A man passes by a section of roof that was blown off a building in the French Quarter of New Orleans on Sunday. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastA man passes by a section of roof that was blown off a building in the French Quarter of New Orleans on Sunday.Hide Caption 9 of 39The Royal Dutch Shell refinery in Norco, Louisiana, is seen as Hurricane Ida makes landfall Sunday. More than 95% of the Gulf of Mexico's oil production facilities have been shut down, regulators said, indicating the storm's <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/29/business/hurricane-ida-oil-industry-disruption/index.html" target="_blank">significant impact on energy supply.</a>The Royal Dutch Shell refinery in Norco, Louisiana, is seen as Hurricane Ida makes landfall Sunday. More than 95% of the Gulf of Mexico's oil production facilities have been shut down, regulators said, indicating the storm's <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/29/business/hurricane-ida-oil-industry-disruption/index.html" target="_blank">significant impact on energy supply.</a> Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastThe Royal Dutch Shell refinery in Norco, Louisiana, is seen as Hurricane Ida makes landfall Sunday. More than 95% of the Gulf of Mexico’s oil production facilities have been shut down, regulators said, indicating the storm’s significant impact on energy supply.Hide Caption 10 of 39People walk through the French Quarter in New Orleans on Sunday.People walk through the French Quarter in New Orleans on Sunday. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastPeople walk through the French Quarter in New Orleans on Sunday.Hide Caption 11 of 39Firefighters look out the window of a shelter in Bourg, Louisiana, on Sunday as the storm passes.Firefighters look out the window of a shelter in Bourg, Louisiana, on Sunday as the storm passes. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastFirefighters look out the window of a shelter in Bourg, Louisiana, on Sunday as the storm passes.Hide Caption 12 of 39Storm clouds pass over a cemetery in New Orleans on Sunday.Storm clouds pass over a cemetery in New Orleans on Sunday. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastStorm clouds pass over a cemetery in New Orleans on Sunday.Hide Caption 13 of 39LaKeisha Verdin holds her 3-month-old son, Kevin, as she walks onto the front porch where her family was watching weather updates on the local news Sunday in Houma, Louisiana.LaKeisha Verdin holds her 3-month-old son, Kevin, as she walks onto the front porch where her family was watching weather updates on the local news Sunday in Houma, Louisiana. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastLaKeisha Verdin holds her 3-month-old son, Kevin, as she walks onto the front porch where her family was watching weather updates on the local news Sunday in Houma, Louisiana.Hide Caption 14 of 39A news crew reports from the edge of Lake Pontchartrain in New Orleans on Sunday.A news crew reports from the edge of Lake Pontchartrain in New Orleans on Sunday. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastA news crew reports from the edge of Lake Pontchartrain in New Orleans on Sunday.Hide Caption 15 of 39Wind blows Monroe Best's hair and face mask Sunday in New Orleans.Wind blows Monroe Best's hair and face mask Sunday in New Orleans. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastWind blows Monroe Best’s hair and face mask Sunday in New Orleans.Hide Caption 16 of 39Bourbon Street in New Orleans is nearly empty on Sunday.Bourbon Street in New Orleans is nearly empty on Sunday. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastBourbon Street in New Orleans is nearly empty on Sunday.Hide Caption 17 of 39A vehicle is abandoned in a flooded ditch next to the highway Sunday in Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi.A vehicle is abandoned in a flooded ditch next to the highway Sunday in Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastA vehicle is abandoned in a flooded ditch next to the highway Sunday in Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi.Hide Caption 18 of 39A man carrying his belongings walks past a sign outside the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans on Sunday.A man carrying his belongings walks past a sign outside the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans on Sunday. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastA man carrying his belongings walks past a sign outside the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans on Sunday.Hide Caption 19 of 39A wall of rain moves over downtown New Orleans on Sunday.A wall of rain moves over downtown New Orleans on Sunday. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastA wall of rain moves over downtown New Orleans on Sunday.Hide Caption 20 of 39The Boudreaux family sits on their front porch Sunday as they await the arrival of Hurricane Ida.The Boudreaux family sits on their front porch Sunday as they await the arrival of Hurricane Ida. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastThe Boudreaux family sits on their front porch Sunday as they await the arrival of Hurricane Ida.Hide Caption 21 of 39A man walks along the Mississippi River near the French Quarter in New Orleans early Sunday.A man walks along the Mississippi River near the French Quarter in New Orleans early Sunday. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastA man walks along the Mississippi River near the French Quarter in New Orleans early Sunday.Hide Caption 22 of 39People stand in line at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport on Saturday, August 28. Many residents were evacuating the area ahead of Hurricane Ida.People stand in line at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport on Saturday, August 28. Many residents were evacuating the area ahead of Hurricane Ida. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastPeople stand in line at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport on Saturday, August 28. Many residents were evacuating the area ahead of Hurricane Ida.Hide Caption 23 of 39Crews reopen a flood gate to help trapped motorists who missed a closure deadline on Saturday.Crews reopen a flood gate to help trapped motorists who missed a closure deadline on Saturday. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastCrews reopen a flood gate to help trapped motorists who missed a closure deadline on Saturday.Hide Caption 24 of 39Keith Clark brings a rope to a friend to help tie down a houseboat before he evacuates Jean Lafitte, Louisiana, on Saturday.Keith Clark brings a rope to a friend to help tie down a houseboat before he evacuates Jean Lafitte, Louisiana, on Saturday. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastKeith Clark brings a rope to a friend to help tie down a houseboat before he evacuates Jean Lafitte, Louisiana, on Saturday.Hide Caption 25 of 39Nikeia Washington from Vacherie, Louisiana, holds her granddaughter, Halia Zenon, at a hotel in downtown Shreveport, Louisiana, where they evacuated to ahead of the storm.Nikeia Washington from Vacherie, Louisiana, holds her granddaughter, Halia Zenon, at a hotel in downtown Shreveport, Louisiana, where they evacuated to ahead of the storm. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastNikeia Washington from Vacherie, Louisiana, holds her granddaughter, Halia Zenon, at a hotel in downtown Shreveport, Louisiana, where they evacuated to ahead of the storm.Hide Caption 26 of 39People walk down Bourbon Street in New Orleans on Saturday. <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/27/us/new-orleans-hurricane-ida-preparations/index.html" target="_blank">Evacuation was voluntary</a> for parts of the city inside its flood protection system. Other areas were under a mandatory evacuation order.People walk down Bourbon Street in New Orleans on Saturday. <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/27/us/new-orleans-hurricane-ida-preparations/index.html" target="_blank">Evacuation was voluntary</a> for parts of the city inside its flood protection system. Other areas were under a mandatory evacuation order. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastPeople walk down Bourbon Street in New Orleans on Saturday. Evacuation was voluntary for parts of the city inside its flood protection system. Other areas were under a mandatory evacuation order.Hide Caption 27 of 39Larry Ackman, bottom, helps neighbor Mike Jackson, left, and his son Cody board up windows Saturday in Morgan City, Louisiana.Larry Ackman, bottom, helps neighbor Mike Jackson, left, and his son Cody board up windows Saturday in Morgan City, Louisiana. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastLarry Ackman, bottom, helps neighbor Mike Jackson, left, and his son Cody board up windows Saturday in Morgan City, Louisiana.Hide Caption 28 of 39Traffic moves slowly along I-10 West on Saturday in Vinton, Louisiana, as residents evacuate toward Texas.Traffic moves slowly along I-10 West on Saturday in Vinton, Louisiana, as residents evacuate toward Texas. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastTraffic moves slowly along I-10 West on Saturday in Vinton, Louisiana, as residents evacuate toward Texas.Hide Caption 29 of 39A man drives a tractor through a flooded street Saturday in Guanimar, Cuba. Before entering the Gulf, Ida made landfall twice over Cuba as a Category 1 hurricane.A man drives a tractor through a flooded street Saturday in Guanimar, Cuba. Before entering the Gulf, Ida made landfall twice over Cuba as a Category 1 hurricane. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastA man drives a tractor through a flooded street Saturday in Guanimar, Cuba. Before entering the Gulf, Ida made landfall twice over Cuba as a Category 1 hurricane.Hide Caption 30 of 39President Joe Biden speaks during a FEMA briefing on Hurricane Ida on Saturday. "This weekend is the anniversary of Hurricane Katrina," Biden said, "and it's a stark reminder that we have to do everything we can to prepare the people in the region to make sure we're ready to respond."President Joe Biden speaks during a FEMA briefing on Hurricane Ida on Saturday. "This weekend is the anniversary of Hurricane Katrina," Biden said, "and it's a stark reminder that we have to do everything we can to prepare the people in the region to make sure we're ready to respond." Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastPresident Joe Biden speaks during a FEMA briefing on Hurricane Ida on Saturday. “This weekend is the anniversary of Hurricane Katrina,” Biden said, “and it’s a stark reminder that we have to do everything we can to prepare the people in the region to make sure we’re ready to respond.”Hide Caption 31 of 39Dawn breaks over a Hurricane Katrina memorial at Shell Beach in St. Bernard, Louisiana, on Saturday. <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/29/us/gallery/hurricane-katrina/index.html" target="_blank">Katrina made landfall</a> on August 29, 2005.Dawn breaks over a Hurricane Katrina memorial at Shell Beach in St. Bernard, Louisiana, on Saturday. <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/29/us/gallery/hurricane-katrina/index.html" target="_blank">Katrina made landfall</a> on August 29, 2005. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastDawn breaks over a Hurricane Katrina memorial at Shell Beach in St. Bernard, Louisiana, on Saturday. Katrina made landfall on August 29, 2005.Hide Caption 32 of 39Clare and Joe Cermak work on putting storm shutters up on their home in Louisiana's St. Charles Parish on Saturday.Clare and Joe Cermak work on putting storm shutters up on their home in Louisiana's St. Charles Parish on Saturday. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastClare and Joe Cermak work on putting storm shutters up on their home in Louisiana’s St. Charles Parish on Saturday.Hide Caption 33 of 39Highway traffic moves slowly overnight Saturday near Kenner, Louisiana, as many residents evacuate ahead of Hurricane Ida.Highway traffic moves slowly overnight Saturday near Kenner, Louisiana, as many residents evacuate ahead of Hurricane Ida. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastHighway traffic moves slowly overnight Saturday near Kenner, Louisiana, as many residents evacuate ahead of Hurricane Ida.Hide Caption 34 of 39Gregory Moore, left, helps fill sand bags as residents in Gulfport, Mississippi, prepare for the storm on Saturday.Gregory Moore, left, helps fill sand bags as residents in Gulfport, Mississippi, prepare for the storm on Saturday. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastGregory Moore, left, helps fill sand bags as residents in Gulfport, Mississippi, prepare for the storm on Saturday.Hide Caption 35 of 39John Guenther unloads about 400 crab traps that he had to pull out of the water and move via flatbed trailer to dry near his home in the eastern St. Bernard Parish on Friday, August 27.John Guenther unloads about 400 crab traps that he had to pull out of the water and move via flatbed trailer to dry near his home in the eastern St. Bernard Parish on Friday, August 27. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastJohn Guenther unloads about 400 crab traps that he had to pull out of the water and move via flatbed trailer to dry near his home in the eastern St. Bernard Parish on Friday, August 27.Hide Caption 36 of 39Jennifer Tate fuels up a gas can Friday in Pass Christian, Mississippi.Jennifer Tate fuels up a gas can Friday in Pass Christian, Mississippi. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastJennifer Tate fuels up a gas can Friday in Pass Christian, Mississippi.Hide Caption 37 of 39Workers stack bags of ice into a gas station freezer on Friday in Jefferson, Louisiana.Workers stack bags of ice into a gas station freezer on Friday in Jefferson, Louisiana. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastWorkers stack bags of ice into a gas station freezer on Friday in Jefferson, Louisiana.Hide Caption 38 of 39A resident hammers the shutters of a 100-year-old house in New Orleans on Friday.A resident hammers the shutters of a 100-year-old house in New Orleans on Friday. Photos: Hurricane Ida lashes Gulf CoastA resident hammers the shutters of a 100-year-old house in New Orleans on Friday.Hide Caption 39 of 39BPT107 Hurricane Ida 083021BPT101 Hurricane Ida 08302124 hurricane ida 0829 bourgBPT102 Hurricane Ida RESTRICTED 083021BPT104 Hurricane Ida 08302120 hurricane ida 082919 hurricane ida 0829 fema hqBPT103 Hurricane Ida 08302111 hurricane ida 0829 new orleans18 hurricane ida 0829 norco refinery16b hurricane ida 0829 new orleans12 hurricane ida 0829 bourg louisiana17 hurricane ida 0829 new orleans08 hurricane ida 0829 houma07 hurricane ida 0829 new orleans04 hurricane ida 0829 new orleansBPT107 Hurricane Ida RESTRICTED 08292113 hurricane ida 0829 mississippi03 hurricane ida 0829BPT105 Hurricane Ida RESTRICTED 08302105 hurricane ida 0829 new orleansBPT104 Hurrican Ida 08302124 hurricane ida 0828 louisiana02 hurricane ida 082918 hurricane ida 082817 hurricane ida 0828BPT106 Hurricane Ida 08302120 hurricane ida 082825 hurricane ida 082819 hurricane ida 082815 hurriicane ida 082810 hurricane ida 082815 hurricane ida 082812 hurricane ida 082814 hurricane ida 082811 hurricane ida 082808b hurricane ida prep 0827 mississippi02 hurricane ida prep 0827 Louisiana 03 hurricane ida prep 0827 Louisiana Read More 2. AfghanistanThe US carried out a defensive airstrike yesterday in Kabul, targeting a car that contained a suspected ISIS-K suicide bomber who posed what US Central Command called an “imminent” threat to the airport. The violence continued this morning, when as many as five rockets were fired at Kabul airport. The US says the attack has not hampered ongoing evacuation efforts, but more threats — including potentially to the US homeland — may remain. The clock is ticking on tomorrow’s deadline to get US troops and Americans out of Afghanistan. It follows the terrorist attack on the Kabul airport last week that left at least 170 dead. The US and about 100 other countries have pledged to hold the Taliban to their promises to let people leave the country after tomorrow. The Biden administration has said the deadline is “not a cliff,” and it is committed to “safe passage” for all Americans and Afghan allies. Remembering US service members killed in Kabul bombingRemembering US service members killed in Kabul bombingRemembering US service members killed in Kabul bombingJUST WATCHEDRemembering US service members killed in Kabul bombingReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Remembering US service members killed in Kabul bombing 04:023. CoronavirusAnother 100,000 people could die of Covid-19 in the US by December if vaccination efforts and other safety measures aren’t fulfilled, Dr. Anthony Fauci says. However, if some of the 80 million or so eligible unvaccinated Americans choose to get the shot, things could be less dire. The current daily average of 155,000 newly reported infections has left many hospitals deeply shorthanded. Available beds, ventilators and staff have been hard to come by in some hospitals, and now that scarcity has spread to oxygen supplies. One doctor in Florida, which has the highest hospitalization rate in the country, says he’s seeing younger and younger patients die of the disease. They are all unvaccinated, he added.Inside Mississippi hospital stretched to brink amid Delta surgeInside Mississippi hospital stretched to brink amid Delta surgeInside Mississippi hospital stretched to brink amid Delta surgeJUST WATCHEDInside Mississippi hospital stretched to brink amid Delta surgeReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Inside Mississippi hospital stretched to brink amid Delta surge 05:094. North KoreaNorth Korea appears to have restarted operations at a power plant capable of producing plutonium for nuclear weapons. The International Atomic Energy Agency, which serves as the United Nations’ nuclear watchdog, says the development is “deeply troubling” and “a cause for serious concern.” Such activity violates UN Security Council resolutions, says the IAEA, which monitors nuclear facilities remotely since its inspectors were kicked out of the country in 2009. Relations between the US and North Korea have been frosty for years, and the Biden administration has reportedly reached out to the regime to restart discussion with Washington. Kim Jong Un has a message for the US (June)Kim Jong Un has a message for the US (June)Kim Jong Un has a message for the US (June)JUST WATCHEDKim Jong Un has a message for the US (June)ReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Kim Jong Un has a message for the US (June) 03:145. California recallTension is building ahead of an election in California that could end with the ousting of Gov. Gavin Newsom. Californians will vote in a recall election on September 14, and if a majority of voters want to replace Newsom, whichever challenger gets the most votes could do just that. Right now, polls show most Californians aren’t in favor of a recall, but the fact that Newsom’s possible exit could pave the way for a political unknown to take the reins is making Democrats nervous. Efforts to recall Newsom began last year among conservatives who took issue with the governor’s record on immigration, taxes, the death penalty and the state’s homelessness crisis. They ramped up as California faced more challenges from Covid-19.Democratic support for California Gov. Newsom dwindlingDemocratic support for California Gov. Newsom dwindlingDemocratic support for California Gov. Newsom dwindlingJUST WATCHEDDemocratic support for California Gov. Newsom dwindlingReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Democratic support for California Gov. Newsom dwindling 02:53BREAKFAST BROWSEKanye West releases a new album, ‘Donda,’ after a delayIt does have about 27 tracks, so it probably took some time to put together.Southern fast food chain Bojangles will close for two Mondays to give staff a ‘well-deserved break’They all deserve a Bo-berry Biscuit and a nap. Coffee may reduce risk of death from stroke and heart diseaseJust a little something to tell yourself as you head to the coffee pot for a refill.It's thumbs up today, but the news on coffee has not always been positive. Take a look at the arguments for and against coffee through the centuries.It's thumbs up today, but the news on coffee has not always been positive. Take a look at the arguments for and against coffee through the centuries. Photos: Coffee's health historyIt’s thumbs up today, but the news on coffee has not always been positive. Take a look at the arguments for and against coffee through the centuries.Hide Caption 1 of 15Legend has it that coffee was discovered by Kaldi, an Ethiopian goatherd, after he caught his suddenly frisky goats eating glossy green leaves and red berries and then tried it for himself. Legend has it that coffee was discovered by Kaldi, an Ethiopian goatherd, after he caught his suddenly frisky goats eating glossy green leaves and red berries and then tried it for himself. Photos: Coffee's health history1500s headline: Coffee makes you frisky – Legend has it that coffee was discovered by Kaldi, an Ethiopian goatherd, after he caught his suddenly frisky goats eating glossy green leaves and red berries and then tried it for himself. Hide Caption 2 of 15But it was the Arabs who started coffeehouses, and that's where coffee got its first black mark. Patrons of coffeehouses were said to be more likely to gamble and engage in "criminally unorthodox sexual situations," according to author <a href="https://www.washington.edu/uwpress/search/books/HATCOF.html" target="_blank">Ralph Hattox</a>. But it was the Arabs who started coffeehouses, and that's where coffee got its first black mark. Patrons of coffeehouses were said to be more likely to gamble and engage in "criminally unorthodox sexual situations," according to author <a href="https://www.washington.edu/uwpress/search/books/HATCOF.html" target="_blank">Ralph Hattox</a>. Photos: Coffee's health history1500s headline: Coffee leads to illegal sex – But it was the Arabs who started coffeehouses, and that’s where coffee got its first black mark. Patrons of coffeehouses were said to be more likely to gamble and engage in “criminally unorthodox sexual situations,” according to author Ralph Hattox. Hide Caption 3 of 15As the popularity of coffee grew and spread, the medical community began to extol its benefits. It was especially popular in England as a cure for alcoholism, one of the biggest medical problems of the time.As the popularity of coffee grew and spread, the medical community began to extol its benefits. It was especially popular in England as a cure for alcoholism, one of the biggest medical problems of the time. Photos: Coffee's health history1600s headline: Coffee cures alcoholism – As the popularity of coffee grew and spread, the medical community began to extol its benefits. It was especially popular in England as a cure for alcoholism, one of the biggest medical problems of the time.Hide Caption 4 of 15This 1652 ad by London coffee shop owner Pasqua Rosée popularized coffee's healthy status, claiming that coffee could aid digestion, prevent and cure gout and scurvy, help coughs, headaches and stomachaches, and even prevent miscarriages. This 1652 ad by London coffee shop owner Pasqua Rosée popularized coffee's healthy status, claiming that coffee could aid digestion, prevent and cure gout and scurvy, help coughs, headaches and stomachaches, and even prevent miscarriages. Photos: Coffee's health history1600s headline: Coffee cures all? – This 1652 ad by London coffee shop owner Pasqua Rosée popularized coffee’s healthy status, claiming that coffee could aid digestion, prevent and cure gout and scurvy, help coughs, headaches and stomachaches, and even prevent miscarriages. Hide Caption 5 of 15By 1730, tea had replaced coffee in London as the daily drink of choice. That preference continued in the colonies until 1773, when the famous Boston Tea Party made it unpatriotic to drink tea. Coffee houses popped up everywhere, and the marvelous stimulant qualities of the brew were said to contribute to the ability of the colonists to work longer hours. By 1730, tea had replaced coffee in London as the daily drink of choice. That preference continued in the colonies until 1773, when the famous Boston Tea Party made it unpatriotic to drink tea. Coffee houses popped up everywhere, and the marvelous stimulant qualities of the brew were said to contribute to the ability of the colonists to work longer hours. Photos: Coffee's health history1700s headline: Coffee helps you work longer – By 1730, tea had replaced coffee in London as the daily drink of choice. That preference continued in the colonies until 1773, when the famous Boston Tea Party made it unpatriotic to drink tea. Coffee houses popped up everywhere, and the marvelous stimulant qualities of the brew were said to contribute to the ability of the colonists to work longer hours. Hide Caption 6 of 15In the mid-1800s, America was at war with itself, and one side effect was that coffee supplies ran short. Enter toasted grain-based beverage substitutes such as Kellogg's "Caramel Coffee" and C.W. Post's "Postum" (still manufactured), which advertised with anti-coffee tirades to boost sales. In the mid-1800s, America was at war with itself, and one side effect was that coffee supplies ran short. Enter toasted grain-based beverage substitutes such as Kellogg's "Caramel Coffee" and C.W. Post's "Postum" (still manufactured), which advertised with anti-coffee tirades to boost sales. Photos: Coffee's health history1800s headline: Coffee shortage – In the mid-1800s, America was at war with itself, and one side effect was that coffee supplies ran short. Enter toasted grain-based beverage substitutes such as Kellogg’s “Caramel Coffee” and C.W. Post’s “Postum” (still manufactured), which advertised with anti-coffee tirades to boost sales. Hide Caption 7 of 15Postum's ads <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=Hy0YIUYybOsC&pg=PA131&lpg=PA131&dq=19th-century+inventor+C.+W.+Post+on+coffee+bad+for+you&source=bl&ots=g2hh-151v4&sig=puGib3_29lDVz6F027IKRlnTNNY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CCkQ6AEwAmoVChMIiY25raukxwIVSVw-Ch14BwLK#v=onepage&q&f=false" target="_blank">against coffee</a> were especially negative, claiming that coffee was as bad as morphine, cocaine, nicotine or strychnine and could cause blindness. Postum's ads <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=Hy0YIUYybOsC&pg=PA131&lpg=PA131&dq=19th-century+inventor+C.+W.+Post+on+coffee+bad+for+you&source=bl&ots=g2hh-151v4&sig=puGib3_29lDVz6F027IKRlnTNNY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CCkQ6AEwAmoVChMIiY25raukxwIVSVw-Ch14BwLK#v=onepage&q&f=false" target="_blank">against coffee</a> were especially negative, claiming that coffee was as bad as morphine, cocaine, nicotine or strychnine and could cause blindness. Photos: Coffee's health history1800s headline: Coffee will make you go blind – Postum’s ads against coffee were especially negative, claiming that coffee was as bad as morphine, cocaine, nicotine or strychnine and could cause blindness. Hide Caption 8 of 15Medical concerns and negative public beliefs about the benefits of coffee rose in the early 1900s. Good Housekeeping magazine <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=ve5AAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA113#v=onepage&q&f=false" target="_blank">wrote about how coffee stunts growth</a>. <br />Medical concerns and negative public beliefs about the benefits of coffee rose in the early 1900s. Good Housekeeping magazine <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=ve5AAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA113#v=onepage&q&f=false" target="_blank">wrote about how coffee stunts growth</a>. <br /> Photos: Coffee's health history1916 headline: Coffee stunts your growth – Medical concerns and negative public beliefs about the benefits of coffee rose in the early 1900s. Good Housekeeping magazine wrote about how coffee stunts growth. Hide Caption 9 of 15In a 1927 Science magazine article, 80,000 elementary and junior high kids were asked about their coffee drinking habits. Researchers found the "startling" fact that most of them drank more than a cup of coffee a day, which was compared with scholarship with mostly negative results. In a 1927 Science magazine article, 80,000 elementary and junior high kids were asked about their coffee drinking habits. Researchers found the "startling" fact that most of them drank more than a cup of coffee a day, which was compared with scholarship with mostly negative results. Photos: Coffee's health history1927 headline: Coffee will give you bad grades, kids – In a 1927 Science magazine article, 80,000 elementary and junior high kids were asked about their coffee drinking habits. Researchers found the “startling” fact that most of them drank more than a cup of coffee a day, which was compared with scholarship with mostly negative results. Hide Caption 10 of 15In 1978, the same year Baseball Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio began selling Mr. Coffee on TV, a <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/339084" target="_blank">New England Journal of Medicine</a> study found a short-term rise in blood pressure after three cups of coffee. <br /><br />And a<a href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM197307122890203#t=articleTop" target="_blank"> 1973 study</a> found that drinking one to five cups of coffee a day increased risk of heart attacks by 60%, while drinking six or more cups a day doubled that risk to 120%. In 1978, the same year Baseball Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio began selling Mr. Coffee on TV, a <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/339084" target="_blank">New England Journal of Medicine</a> study found a short-term rise in blood pressure after three cups of coffee. <br /><br />And a<a href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM197307122890203#t=articleTop" target="_blank"> 1973 study</a> found that drinking one to five cups of coffee a day increased risk of heart attacks by 60%, while drinking six or more cups a day doubled that risk to 120%. Photos: Coffee's health history1970s headline: Coffee is as serious as a heart attack – In 1978, the same year Baseball Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio began selling Mr. Coffee on TV, a New England Journal of Medicine study found a short-term rise in blood pressure after three cups of coffee. And a 1973 study found that drinking one to five cups of coffee a day increased risk of heart attacks by 60%, while drinking six or more cups a day doubled that risk to 120%. Hide Caption 11 of 15Now begins the era of the meta-analysis, in which researchers look at hundreds of studies and apply scientific principles to find those which do the best job of randomizing and controlling for compounding factors, such as smoking. The results for coffee: mostly good.<br /><br />But first, a couple of negatives: A <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11369742" target="_blank">2001 study</a> found a 20% increase in risk of urinary tract cancer for coffee drinkers but not tea drinkers. That finding was repeated in a <a href="http://www.nature.com/articles/srep09051" target="_blank">2015 meta-analysis</a>. So if this is a risk factor in your family history, you might want to switch to tea.<br /><br />And a 2010 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19362749" target="_blank">meta-analysis</a> found a correlation between coffee consumption and lung disease, but the study found it impossible to completely eliminate the confounding effects of smoking.Now begins the era of the meta-analysis, in which researchers look at hundreds of studies and apply scientific principles to find those which do the best job of randomizing and controlling for compounding factors, such as smoking. The results for coffee: mostly good.<br /><br />But first, a couple of negatives: A <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11369742" target="_blank">2001 study</a> found a 20% increase in risk of urinary tract cancer for coffee drinkers but not tea drinkers. That finding was repeated in a <a href="http://www.nature.com/articles/srep09051" target="_blank">2015 meta-analysis</a>. So if this is a risk factor in your family history, you might want to switch to tea.<br /><br />And a 2010 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19362749" target="_blank">meta-analysis</a> found a correlation between coffee consumption and lung disease, but the study found it impossible to completely eliminate the confounding effects of smoking. Photos: Coffee's health history2000 era headline: Time for meta-analysis – Now begins the era of the meta-analysis, in which researchers look at hundreds of studies and apply scientific principles to find those which do the best job of randomizing and controlling for compounding factors, such as smoking. The results for coffee: mostly good.But first, a couple of negatives: A 2001 study found a 20% increase in risk of urinary tract cancer for coffee drinkers but not tea drinkers. That finding was repeated in a 2015 meta-analysis. So if this is a risk factor in your family history, you might want to switch to tea.And a 2010 meta-analysis found a correlation between coffee consumption and lung disease, but the study found it impossible to completely eliminate the confounding effects of smoking.Hide Caption 12 of 15A<a href="http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/174/9/993.long" target="_blank"> meta-analysis</a> of 11 studies on the link between stroke risk and coffee consumption between 1966 and 2011, with nearly a half a million participants, found no negative connection. And a 2012 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3526718/" target="_blank">meta-analysis</a> of studies between 2001 and 2011 found four or more cups a day had a preventative effect on your risk for stroke.  <br /><br />This <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016508507005689" target="_blank">meta-analysis </a>showed that drinking two cups of black coffee a day could reduce the risk of liver cancer by 43%. Those findings were <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1542356513006095" target="_blank">replicated</a> in 2013 in two <a href="http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-230X/13/34" target="_blank">other studies. </a><br /><br />As for prostate cancer, a <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21586702" target="_blank">2011 study</a> followed nearly 59,000 men from 1986 to 2006 and found drinking coffee to be highly associated with lower risk for the lethal form of the disease. A<a href="http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/174/9/993.long" target="_blank"> meta-analysis</a> of 11 studies on the link between stroke risk and coffee consumption between 1966 and 2011, with nearly a half a million participants, found no negative connection. And a 2012 <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3526718/" target="_blank">meta-analysis</a> of studies between 2001 and 2011 found four or more cups a day had a preventative effect on your risk for stroke.  <br /><br />This <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016508507005689" target="_blank">meta-analysis </a>showed that drinking two cups of black coffee a day could reduce the risk of liver cancer by 43%. Those findings were <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1542356513006095" target="_blank">replicated</a> in 2013 in two <a href="http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-230X/13/34" target="_blank">other studies. </a><br /><br />As for prostate cancer, a <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21586702" target="_blank">2011 study</a> followed nearly 59,000 men from 1986 to 2006 and found drinking coffee to be highly associated with lower risk for the lethal form of the disease. Photos: Coffee's health history2007-2013 headlines: Coffee reduces risk of stroke and some cancers – A meta-analysis of 11 studies on the link between stroke risk and coffee consumption between 1966 and 2011, with nearly a half a million participants, found no negative connection. And a 2012 meta-analysis of studies between 2001 and 2011 found four or more cups a day had a preventative effect on your risk for stroke. This meta-analysis showed that drinking two cups of black coffee a day could reduce the risk of liver cancer by 43%. Those findings were replicated in 2013 in two other studies. As for prostate cancer, a 2011 study followed nearly 59,000 men from 1986 to 2006 and found drinking coffee to be highly associated with lower risk for the lethal form of the disease. Hide Caption 13 of 15A similar analysis of studies on<a href="http://circheartfailure.ahajournals.org/content/5/4/401.long" target="_blank"> heart failure</a> found four cups a day provided the lowest risk for heart failure, and you had to drink a whopping 10 cups a day to get a bad association.<br /><br />And overall heart disease? A <a href="http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/129/6/643.long" target="_blank">meta-analysis</a> of 36 studies with more than 1.2 million participants found that moderate coffee drinking seemed to be associated with a low risk for heart disease; plus, there wasn't a higher risk among those who drank more than five cups a day.A similar analysis of studies on<a href="http://circheartfailure.ahajournals.org/content/5/4/401.long" target="_blank"> heart failure</a> found four cups a day provided the lowest risk for heart failure, and you had to drink a whopping 10 cups a day to get a bad association.<br /><br />And overall heart disease? A <a href="http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/129/6/643.long" target="_blank">meta-analysis</a> of 36 studies with more than 1.2 million participants found that moderate coffee drinking seemed to be associated with a low risk for heart disease; plus, there wasn't a higher risk among those who drank more than five cups a day. Photos: Coffee's health historyA similar analysis of studies on heart failure found four cups a day provided the lowest risk for heart failure, and you had to drink a whopping 10 cups a day to get a bad association.And overall heart disease? A meta-analysis of 36 studies with more than 1.2 million participants found that moderate coffee drinking seemed to be associated with a low risk for heart disease; plus, there wasn’t a higher risk among those who drank more than five cups a day.Hide Caption 14 of 15How about coffee's effects on your overall risk of death? One 2013 analysis of <a href="http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9205090&fileId=S0007114513003814" target="_blank">20 studies</a>, and another that included <a href="http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9627964&fileId=S1368980014001438" target="_blank">17 studies</a>, both of which included more than a million people, found that drinking coffee reduced your total mortality risk slightly.<br /><br />And as a sign of the times, in 2015, the<a href="http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-scientific-report/PDFs/Scientific-Report-of-the-2015-Dietary-Guidelines-Advisory-Committee.pdf" target="_blank"> US Department of Agriculture</a> agreed that "coffee can be incorporated into a healthy lifestyle," especially if you stay within three and five cups a day (a maximum of 400 milligrams of caffeine) and avoid fattening cream and sugar. You can read its analysis of data <a href="http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-scientific-report/10-chapter-5/d5-4.asp" target="_blank">here.</a>How about coffee's effects on your overall risk of death? One 2013 analysis of <a href="http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9205090&fileId=S0007114513003814" target="_blank">20 studies</a>, and another that included <a href="http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9627964&fileId=S1368980014001438" target="_blank">17 studies</a>, both of which included more than a million people, found that drinking coffee reduced your total mortality risk slightly.<br /><br />And as a sign of the times, in 2015, the<a href="http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-scientific-report/PDFs/Scientific-Report-of-the-2015-Dietary-Guidelines-Advisory-Committee.pdf" target="_blank"> US Department of Agriculture</a> agreed that "coffee can be incorporated into a healthy lifestyle," especially if you stay within three and five cups a day (a maximum of 400 milligrams of caffeine) and avoid fattening cream and sugar. You can read its analysis of data <a href="http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-scientific-report/10-chapter-5/d5-4.asp" target="_blank">here.</a> Photos: Coffee's health history2015 headline: Coffee is practically a health food – How about coffee’s effects on your overall risk of death? One 2013 analysis of 20 studies, and another that included 17 studies, both of which included more than a million people, found that drinking coffee reduced your total mortality risk slightly.And as a sign of the times, in 2015, the US Department of Agriculture agreed that “coffee can be incorporated into a healthy lifestyle,” especially if you stay within three and five cups a day (a maximum of 400 milligrams of caffeine) and avoid fattening cream and sugar. You can read its analysis of data here.Hide Caption 15 of 1506 coffee health RESTRICTED04 coffee health RESTRICTED03 coffee health RESTRICTED02 coffee health RESTRICTED17 coffee health08 coffee health 18 coffee health RESTRICTED12 coffee health13 coffee health RESTRICTED01 coffee health RESTRICTED07 coffee health RESTRICTED14 coffee health RESTRICTED15 coffee health16 coffee health10 coffee healthGreenland expedition discovers ‘world’s northernmost island’For when you really, REALLY wanna get away. Top toymakers say their products will be harder to find and more expensive this holiday seasonStart brushing up on your bargaining strategies and hand-to-hand combat; the annual holiday toy battle is approaching!IN MEMORIAMEd Asner, the Emmy Award-winning actor best known for playing the crusty but lovable newsman Lou Grant on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” has died. He was 91. Ed Asner, 'Mary Tyler Moore Show' actor, dead at 91Ed Asner, 'Mary Tyler Moore Show' actor, dead at 91Ed Asner, 'Mary Tyler Moore Show' actor, dead at 91JUST WATCHEDEd Asner, ‘Mary Tyler Moore Show’ actor, dead at 91ReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Ed Asner, ‘Mary Tyler Moore Show’ actor, dead at 91 02:25TODAY’S NUMBER$1.3 millionThat’s how much the school board in Gloucester County, Virginia, has agreed to pay the American Civil Liberties Union in legal fees. The organization represented Gavin Grimm during a six-year legal battle over transgender bathroom rights at school. Gavin Grimm: SCOTUS bathroom decision a detour (2017)Gavin Grimm: SCOTUS bathroom decision a detour (2017)gavin grimm scotus transgender bathroom case decision sot_00000528JUST WATCHEDGavin Grimm: SCOTUS bathroom decision a detour (2017)ReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Gavin Grimm: SCOTUS bathroom decision a detour (2017) 01:09TODAY’S QUOTE”I have not survived until something has changed.”Jacob Blake, looking back on the year that has passed since he was shot seven times by a Kenosha, Wisconsin, police officer. Blake’s ordeal and the deaths of several other Black men at the hands of police were at the center of a difficult summer of racial justice activism in 2020. Jacob Blake tells GMA 'I didn't want to be the next George Floyd' (January)Jacob Blake tells GMA 'I didn't want to be the next George Floyd' (January)Jacob Blake tells GMA 'I didn't want to be the next George Floyd' (January)JUST WATCHEDJacob Blake tells GMA ‘I didn’t want to be the next George Floyd’ (January)ReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Jacob Blake tells GMA ‘I didn’t want to be the next George Floyd’ (January) 01:52TODAY’S WEATHERIda continues to bring heavy rainfall and severe storms to the EastIda continues to bring heavy rainfall and severe storms to the EastIda continues to bring heavy rainfall and severe storms to the EastJUST WATCHEDIda continues to bring heavy rainfall and severe storms to the EastReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

Ida continues to bring heavy rainfall and severe storms to the East 01:56Check your local forecast here>>>AND FINALLYThese sea slugs can shed their bodies and grow new onesThese sea slugs can shed their bodies and grow new onesThese sea slugs can shed their bodies and grow new onesJUST WATCHEDThese sea slugs can shed their bodies and grow new onesReplayMore Videos …MUST WATCH

These sea slugs can shed their bodies and grow new ones 01:22These sea slugs can shed their bodies and grow new onesPretty jealous of these sea slugs right now. (Click here to view.)

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